All posts for: Public Delivery
This video got banned from the Guggenheim Museum

This video got banned from the Guggenheim Museum

Sun Yuan and Peng Yu - Dogs Which Cannot Touch Each Other, 2003
Sun Yuan and Peng YuDogs Which Cannot Touch Each Other, 2003, 8 Bull Terriers, 8 Running Machines Without Drive

The video work titled Dogs That Cannot Touch Each Other has only recently been removed from Guggenheim Museum’s exhibition series known as Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World. The video series has been met with disapproval and disparagement not only by some art critics but animal lovers and welfare organizations as well. Critics claim that the exhibition would have featured a series of various distinct video presentations depicting instances of unmistakable and unacceptable animal cruelty in the name of art.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Faces of the Arab Spring riots: The public, patriots and villains

Faces of the Arab Spring riots: The public, patriots and villains

Shirin Neshat - Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing. Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud 1
Shirin Neshat – Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing
Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud

The Gladstone Gallery and the Faurschou Foundation in Beijing, China are just some of the art spaces that have had the pleasure of exhibiting Shirin Neshat’s The Book of Kings. The exhibition consisted of a total of 56 black and white photos framed in unmated and black frames that were hung across the two galleries. Neshat, “persona non grata” in Iran due to her art, created the photographs to reference a broad array of important and modern political metaphors.

Shirin’s exhibit was motivated by the series of political uprisings, now commonly known as the Arab Spring, which took place throughout different Arab countries between 2011 and 2012. The Book of Kings explored the causal conditions of power within social and cultural structures in the modern society. The title of the installation was inspired by the 60,000-verse historical poem known as Shahnameh or the Book of Kings in English. 11th-century poet Ferdowsi created the ancient poem that inspired the title of the exhibition, and it chronicled the history of Iran throughout its 7th century Islamic conquest of Persia.

Managing to interweave history, politics, and poetry in one exhibition, Shirin Neshat was able to set the series against the backdrop of the Arab Spring perfectly. Just as Ferdowsi cast the Islamic conquest of Persia as a catastrophe, Neshat’s photographs were also created to commemorate the masses of unknown citizens who sacrificed themselves to see justice and political freedom upheld across many Arab and Middle East countries.

Shirin Neshat’s photographs consisted of three groups of large-scale black and white pictures; hand annotated pictures with poetry, and pictures featuring prison writings that had been done in Farsi calligraphy. These three groups of photographs represented the villains, the patriots, and the public that participated in the Arab Spring riots.

The portraits were hung in a grid covering a whole wall. The portraits featured head shots of both serious looking men and women. The subjects represented the nuances of group emotion during the riots from aspiration and resignation to hope and uncertainty.

Unlike the villains’ section, the patriot segment featured torso level portraits of young subjects placing their hands over their chests. The expressions on these subjects were more intense to include expressions of defiance, pride, and even hatred. The calligraphic elements on the skin of these subjects were larger and bolder as if shouting the expressions rather than whispering them.

Lastly, the villains’ category of the series consisted of pictures of older men. The calligraphic details were elaborate and were placed across the bare chest of the male subjects like tattoos. Observed together, all the three categories represented metaphors, symbols, and emotions that accompany political movements like the Arab Spring.

Shirin Neshat - Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing. Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud
Shirin Neshat – Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing
Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Shirin Neshat - Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing. Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud
Shirin Neshat – Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing
Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Shirin Neshat - Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing. Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud
Shirin Neshat – Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing
Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Shirin Neshat - Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing. Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud
Shirin Neshat – Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing
Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Shirin Neshat - Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing. Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud
Shirin Neshat – Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing
Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Shirin Neshat - Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing. Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud
Shirin Neshat – Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing
Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Shirin Neshat - Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing. Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud
Shirin Neshat – Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing
Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Shirin Neshat - Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing. Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud
Shirin Neshat – Installation view of The Book of Kings at Faurschou Foundation Beijing
Photo by Jonathan Leijonhufvud

Shirin Neshat – Salah (Patriots), 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatSalah (Patriots), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat - Sara Khaki (Patriots), 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatSara Khaki (Patriots), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat – Roja (Patriots), 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatRoja (Patriots), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat - Muhammed (Patriots), 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatMuhammed (Patriots), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat - Nida (Patriots), 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatNida (Patriots), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat - Mana (Masses), 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatMana (Masses), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat - Salah (Masses), 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatSalah (Masses), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat - Sara Nafisi, 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatSara Nafisi, 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat – Amir (Villians), 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatAmir (Villains), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat – Sherief (Villains), 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatSherief (Villains), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat – Bahram (Villains), 2012, from Book of Kings
Shirin NeshatBahram (Villains), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat - Detail of Bahram (Villians), from Book of Kings
Shirin Neshat – Detail of Bahram (Villains), 2012, from The Book of Kings

Shirin Neshat in her studio working on Roja from "The Book of Kings"
Shirin Neshat in her studio working on Roja from The Book of Kings


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment
This is just an apple

This is just an apple

Yoko Ono with Apple, 1966 at the press preview for Yoko Ono- One Woman Show, 1960-1971, photo by Ryan Muir
Yoko Ono with Apple, 1966 at the press preview for the exhibition Yoko Ono- One Woman Show, 1960-1971 at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2015
Photo: Ryan Muir

A bright green apple spotlighted on top of a tall plexiglas pedestal would have been the first object that you would have seen upon entering the exhibition titled Yoko Ono: one-woman show, 1960-1971. The show, which was held at the Museum of Modern art in New York, was created to give visitors a glimpse of Yoko Ono’s international avant-garde and off-kilter art that was made in the ‘60s.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , | Leave a comment
How North Korea likes to present itself to the world

How North Korea likes to present itself to the world

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Every year, North Korea holds a lavish and extravagant celebration for its ruler known as the Arirang celebrations. The Arirang celebrations can be classified in the same category as the Olympic celebrations. The audience is always treated to a highly choreographed show, the likes of which have only ever been seen at the Olympics.

The Arirang celebrations are a combination of dance, music, art, and patriotism, performed by tens of thousands of gymnasts and dancers. Not many people have ever photographed the Arirang celebrations, but French photojournalist Phillipe Chancel has. The Arirang festivities depict a well-known Korean song by the same name. The Arirang song tells the tale of a young couple that is forcibly torn apart. In this case, the song refers to the division of North and South Korea.

Over the past 20 years, Phillipe Chancel has been taking photographs in North Korea that explore the complex, shifting and ever-growing territory where art, photojournalism, and documentary meet. Phillipe is constantly evolving and so are his projects. His Arirang series focuses on the images that world is confronted with when they do an internet search of North Korea versus what actually happens in the state of North Korea. His photographs of the Arirang festivals offer audiences an unparalleled and uncontrolled image of a tainted version of North Korea.

Most of Chancel’s photographs feature dancers at the festival who move in such a synchronized and uniform fashion that from a distance, it appears as if you are watching the transitions on a TV screen. The Arirang festival offered Chancel some of the best visual materials for the photographic series, which he also titled Arirang.

Not only did pictures of the festival give an enhanced understanding of life in Pyongyang, but the photos also helped to give a glimpse of propaganda. The propaganda filled backdrops, and the colorful matching outfits make a silent but clear statement that has helped people gain a better understanding of the eerie nation.

The celebration also reflects the significant artistic capabilities that human beings are capable of while highlighting the tyrannical rule that North Korean citizens are made to endure in the 21st century. On one side, the photographs make North Koreans appear like ordinary people participating in a run of the mill celebrations. However, on the flip side, these people live a very different existential experience where they are segregated from the rest of the world. Luckily for us, photographers like Chancel provide an insider’s look into the most unknown country in the world.

This is Chance’s second North Korean installation which he released after his first project DPRK. DPRK brought him the international recognition that resulted in publications and exhibitions of his works in several prestigious publications and galleries.

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006

Philippe Chancel - Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006
Philippe Chancel – Arirang, May Day Stadium, Pyongyang, North Korea, 2006


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
People love this giant outdoor sculpture that spits out water

People love this giant outdoor sculpture that spits out water

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Within Chicago’s Millennium Park stands an interactive piece of art that the public never seems to have enough of. Designed by Jaume Plensa, a Catalan artist, the fountain is an illustration of how creativity and technology can mingle to form an enchanting piece of work. The work, which was unveiled in July 2004, was executed by Krueck and Sexton Architects and in it they use black granite which gives the illusion of a pool. The pool on which visitors stand on, is an area of space that separates two towers made from glass. Each one of the towers is 50 feet tall and LEDs are used on their surfaces to display inward faces developed by digital videography.

Residents marvel at such a symbolic statue living amongst them. For its value as an entertainment piece, the Crown Fountain appears to live up to its cost of $17 million. This appreciation was not always there, as some people, long before it was built, argued that its towering height would negatively affect the traditional aesthetics of the town. Further controversy would emerge after its completion when surveillance cameras were fitted at the top. These were however quickly removed, at least so that people would feel free.

One of the most impressive features of the Crown Fountain is the power it gives back to humanity. For a chance to walk on water and listen to the sound of it falling, people have travelled far and wide to connect with this piece of art. The use of human faces as images on the towers from where the water pours indicates the coexistence that should exist between human beings and nature. There are benches where visitors can sit and the fact that they are positioned to face each other is an emphasis on the reality of peace when people communicate and genuinely care about each other.

Plensa’s use of video technology is a unique concept and more so for work that is supposed to impact the lives of people from all walks of life. At a personal level, the Crown Fountain is a thought provoker for Plensa and he admitted in a 2006 interview with Sculpture magazine the tension that this project produces draws them closer to each other. Why Crown? Plensa chose the name to pay tribute to the Crown and Goodman families who for a long time had tried to redefine the meaning of public space.

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Great Fire of London: 120m replica of London skyline burned

Great Fire of London: 120m replica of London skyline burned

Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London 5 photo Oliver Rudkin
London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London
Photo: Oliver Rudkin

London is on fire! This is the scene that artist David Best desired to create when he came up with the idea dubbed ‘London 1666’. This is not the first time that David has created something that he would later burn but it is definitely the first in making a creation of such huge proportion. To bring to life the London 1666 project, and having enlisted the help of volunteers, David oversaw the construction of wooden structures that represent various buildings in London in the 17th century. The huge sculpture was not supposed to give a visual of how London looked like at the time, but to provide an image of the skyline. 2017 marked the 350th anniversary since the Great Fire of London and David Best has done his part in remembering the tragedy.

This expression, although not in words, told the story of the historic event. When you imagine the loss that was incurred by thousands of people then, what David is burning does not even come close to comparison. According to historical records, the fire consumed 13,200 houses, 44 livery halls, 87 churches and 400 streets. The wooden recreation was 120-metre long and comprised of 190 miniature buildings. Observers could see structures of churches, factories, homes and schools that were mounted on barges before being set ablaze to burn away as drifted the course of the Thames river.

In 2017, the anniversary of the great fire was commemorated on September 4th. While the fire is deliberate this time, it is a reminder to everyone that lived through the tragedy, heard stories from relatives who did or was witness to the devastation in the aftermath that such cannot happen again. The 1666 fire began on Pudding Lane from Thomas Farriner’s bakery and it is rather ironic that a place where people went for comfort and solace would be the result of misery, to the effect of plunging 65,000 people to homelessness.

David has offered up the work to volunteers. Over months of hard work and commitment, scores of young people from various locations in London have been involved in hard work for the project. Within various placements and workshops, the structures to be used have taken shape and gained validity for use in the anniversary event. Such a historic event would not be complete with a great audience and to make that happen, it was directed by Tim van Someren and presented by Lauren Lavern, familiar faces for those who watched the London 2012 Olympic Opening Ceremony.

Wenceslaus Hollar's "Prospect of the Citty of London, As It Appeared, In The Time of Its Flames" shows the Great Fire of London as seen from across the river, in Southwark. HULTON ARCHIVE / GETTY IMAGES
Wenceslaus Hollar’s “Prospect of the Citty of London, As It Appeared, In The Time of Its Flames” shows the Great Fire of London as seen from across the river, in Southwark.
HULTON ARCHIVE / GETTY IMAGES

Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London 1 JUSTIN TALLIS : AFP:GETTY IMAGES
London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London
Photo: JUSTIN TALLIS / AFP:GETTY IMAGES

Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London 2 Matthew Andrews 2
London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London
Photo: Matthew Andrews

Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London 3 Photo Oliver Rudkin
London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London
Photo: Oliver Rudkin

Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London 4 Photo Matthew Andrews
London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London
Photo: Matthew Andrews

Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London 6 Photo Oliver Rudkin
London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London
Photo: Oliver Rudkin


London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bA0xwx_1eJ4
London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London
Uncut video

London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London, photo Oliver Rudkin
London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London
Photo: Oliver Rudkin

London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London, photo Matthew Andrews
London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London
Photo: Matthew Andrews

London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London, photo DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS : AFP:GETTY IMAGES
London 1666, Replica of 17th-century London, River Thames, London
Photo: DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS / AFP:GETTY IMAGES

London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best in collaboration with Artichoke. Photo Matthew Andrews 1
London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best
Photo: Matthew Andrews

London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best in collaboration with Artichoke. Photo Matthew Andrews 2
London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best
Photo: Matthew Andrews

London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best in collaboration with Artichoke. Photo Oliver Rudkin 1
London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best
Photo: Oliver Rudkin

London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best in collaboration with Artichoke. Photo Oliver Rudkin 2
London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best
Photo: Oliver Rudkin

London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best in collaboration with Artichoke. Photo Oliver Rudkin 3
London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best
Photo: Oliver Rudkin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A4oEL1OiahM
London 1666, Work In Progress, designed by David Best
Video interview with David Best


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment
Uncontrollable destruction when artists flood McDonald’s

Uncontrollable destruction when artists flood McDonald’s

's, 2009, Paris, Ferme du Buisson
SuperflexFlooded McDonald’s, 2009, Paris, Ferme du Buisson, France

In this short film a life size replica of a McDonald’s burger bar gets flooded with water gradually. There are images of furniture being washed away in the water, food floating around the room, and electric appliances short circuit to a halt before space can no longer be seen below the water. While the production lacks the typical disaster drama, it does not fall under artistic film production or documentary. ‘Flooded McDonald’s’ is an insight into the role those big multinationals need to play in the face of disaster. First shown at a gallery in 2010 in South London, the film is the brain work of a group of Danish artists called Superflex.

The group built their idea from scratch; first singling out McDonald’s as the largest fast food restaurant in the world before they recreated a McDonald’s as it might have looked in the 1980s. Why the 80s? The group thought that an image of how an outlet looked like at the time would be most iconic. The function of water was not only meant to illustrate destruction but also to cause the various components within it to come to life. Creation of the film began in 2008 at a time when numerous post-apocalyptic scenarios were going on. The film no doubt focus on serious issues but viewers cannot help laughing at the lack of control of food as it gets washed away with the water.

Superflex has been doing similar projects since the group was constituted in 1993 with members Rasmus Nielsen, Bjørnstjerne Christiansen, and Jacob Fenger. In all their projects, they aim to develop tools with which their audience can use to model their own circumstances. They have done projects on ‘Free Beer’, ‘Guaraná Power’ and installations and film. Most of their projects center on self-organization, democratic conditions, and economic forces. Since these are common issues in many parts of the world, Superflex and their projects have found international recognition. Some of the most spectacular exhibitions they have held in renowned venues are Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt am Main, REDCAT Gallery in Los Angeles, and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington D.C.

Art must reflect real life and while McDonald’s might not suffer the catastrophe that is showcased in this film, the art work opens up the minds of people to destruction especially that which we can control.

https://vimeo.com/12508390
Video (excerpt) of SuperflexFlooded McDonald’s, 2009

https://vimeo.com/150651361
Video (interview) with Superflex about Flooded McDonald’s, 2009

Superflex - Still of Flooded McDonald's, 2009
Superflex – Still of Flooded McDonald’s, 2009

Superflex - Still of Flooded McDonald's, 2009
Superflex – Still of Flooded McDonald’s, 2009

Superflex - Still of Flooded McDonald's, 2009
Superflex – Still of Flooded McDonald’s, 2009

Superflex - Still of Flooded McDonald's, 2009
Superflex – Still of Flooded McDonald’s, 2009

Superflex - Still of Flooded McDonald's, 2009, Peter Blum Gallery in New York
Superflex – Installation view of Flooded McDonald’s, 2009, Peter Blum Gallery, New York

Superflex - Still of Flooded McDonald's, 2009, Peter Blum Gallery in New York
Superflex – Installation view of Flooded McDonald’s, 2009, Peter Blum Gallery, New York

Superflex - Still of Flooded McDonald's, 2009, Peter Blum Gallery in New York
Superflex – Installation view of Flooded McDonald’s, 2009, Peter Blum Gallery, New York

Superflex - Still of Flooded McDonald's, 2009, Peter Blum Gallery in New York
Superflex – Installation view of Flooded McDonald’s, 2009, Peter Blum Gallery, New York


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment
Page 1 of 2412345...1020...Last »
Want inspiration in your inbox?
Ok
close-link
Public Delivery

Public Delivery