Archive: 2007
Surprising photos of veiled female police squad in Iran

Surprising photos of veiled female police squad in Iran

Abbas Kowsari - Police Women Academy, 2006

Abbas Kowsari - Police Women Academy, 2006
Abbas KowsariPolice Women Academy, 2006

In 2003 the first females ever graduated from Iran’s police academy in the capital city Tehran, after undergoing a training of three years. Spiritual leader Ayatollah Khamenei himself had to give permission to Tehran’s police chief Mohammad Baqer Qalibaf to create the first all-female police unit.

Photographer Abbas Kowsari does not shy away from controversial topics. He has worked for over ten Iranian leading newspapers, most of them now banned from publishing. He was granted permission to take photos of the graduation ceremony, which turned out to be quite unusual. “During Qalibaf’s time as police chief,” Kowsari said, “policewomen performed many martial arts and chase routines, including climbing walls and jumping out of the windows of moving cars. But after he stepped down, that training was eliminated. Last year’s ceremony was limited to a parade, speeches, target practice, and the loading of revolvers by blindfolded policewomen graduates. No photographers were allowed.

Abbas Kowsari currently works as the senior photo editor for Shargh newspaper in Tehran and his photos have been published in The New York Times, Time magazine, Der Spiegel and others.

Abbas Kowsari - Police Women Academy, 2007
Abbas KowsariPolice Women Academy, 2007

Abbas Kowsari - Police Women Academy
Abbas KowsariPolice Women Academy

Abbas Kowsari - Police Women Academy
Abbas KowsariPolice Women Academy

Abbas Kowsari - Dragnet Tehran, 2003
Abbas KowsariDragnet Tehran, 2003

Abbas Kowsari - Police Women Academy, 2006
Abbas KowsariPolice Women Academy, 2006

Abbas Kowsari - Police Women Academy Edition- 2/7, 2006
Abbas KowsariPolice Women Academy– 2/7, 2006


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Front row seat to Parisian ghetto

Front row seat to Parisian ghetto

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - La fenêtre, 2005

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - Le groupe, 2007, C-print, 90x120cm
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, Le groupe, 2007

The Algerian-born, Paris-based photographer Mohamed Bourouissa was born in 1978. His work has been presented and featured in an extensive number of solo and group exhibitions at venues including the Centre Pompidou, the Palais de Tokyo, the Palazzo Grassi – François Pinault Foundation in Venice, the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, , the MAXXI in Rome, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Finnish Museum of Photography of Helsinki, the Fotomuseum in Rotterdam, and many more impressive venues.

Mohamed Bourouissa’s pictures are inspired by classical painting, the pictures are expressive declarations pointing at the ethical fallout of photojournalism, focusing on the problematic power relations that take place within the photographic medium in addition to the voyeuristic nature of photojournalism.

Mohamed Bourouissa’s photo’s, like those of many photojournalists work, features impoverished, stylish young African and Arab men and women, some who are immigrants while others are the children of immigrants, living in suburban housing projects on the peripheries of Paris. The photographs, however, are posed, which is where the inspiration of the classical painting comes in, motionlessly elegant.

His photographic works depicts the tensions and the many issues that have implications for the daily lives of young people who live in France’s suburb, or the metropolis’s peripheries. His gripping images have used documentary-style content combined with formal compositions that are influenced by classical paintings. His work looks at socio-political issues that are prevalent in the lives of disenfranchised youth, seeming to call out on the audience to remove any rose colored glasses and address the problems head on. The work, while stunning, creates an uncomfortable reminder for those who ignore the periphery, for those who seem to forget that all is not well, serving to make the truth unavoidable. While some may turn on their heal to run to a nearby overpriced coffee shop where they can hide in the bliss of ignorance, where others may be inspire to address the social issues that this work forces the audience see.

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - Carré Rouge, 2005
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, Carré Rouge, 2005

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - L’impasse, 2007
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, L’impasse, 2007

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - La fenêtre, 2005
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, La fenêtre, 2005

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - La Morsure, 2007
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, La Morsure, 2007

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - La rencontre, 2005
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, La rencontre, 2005

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - Le téléphone, 2006
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, Le téléphone, 2006

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - Le Reflet, 2007
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, Le Reflet, 2007

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique, Sans titre (metro), 2007
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, Sans titre (metro), 2007

Mohamed Bourouissa – Périphérique,
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, 2007

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - La Butte, 2007, 90x120cm
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, La Butte, 2007

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - La République, 2006, Paris, France
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, La République, 2006

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - Le Miroir, 2006
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, Le Miroir, 2006

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - Le poing, 2006
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, Le poing, 2006

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - Le Toit, 2007
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, Le Toit, 2007

Mohamed Bourouissa - Périphérique - Le Couloir, 2007
Mohamed BourouissaPériphérique, Le Couloir, 2007


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52 tons of cardboard cut into 900,000 pieces to create one single photo

52 tons of cardboard cut into 900,000 pieces to create one single photo

Thomas Demand - Grotto, 2006 (detail)

Thomas Demand - Grotto, 2006, Pier 24, San Francisco, 2013, Photo, Blake Gopnik
Thomas DemandGrotto, 2006, Pier 24, San Francisco, 2013
Photo: Blake Gopnik

Thomas Demand has ignited the imaginations and adventurous sides of viewers with his photography piece, titled Grotto. Pulling viewers into an underground cavern covered in beautiful bright stalactites and stalagmites, art lovers find themselves in the center of the earth. However, if viewers look a little deeper, they will find that there is much more with Grotto than what meets the eye. Once viewers come into realization, they are left in awe at the work that had gone into the creation of this photograph.

Demand had to use 52 tons of cardboard cut into 900,000 pieces to construct this life-size model of the innermost depths of a cave in Mallorca, Spain. Demand created this elaborate and lifelike model out of paper and cardboard, and then photographed it.

Demand, an almost photographic purist, never alters or retouches his images. As an artist, Demand was so fastidious regarding the imagery of his work that he built cardboard pixels in order to give particular areas in the image the appearance of a slightly unfocused photograph. His postmodern relationship with reality comes out in his building the image before photographing it. It is said that he more often than not, has never seen the places or objects that he photographs. Demand has only seen the models of them. Grotto for example is based on a tourist postcard. Thus the photographs he takes are of models based off of photographs.

The model he creates looks unbelievably natural from a distance until you see the artifice. He uses painting techniques of the 1500s known as ‘grottesca’ (grotesque) and virtual computer technology to help with the creation of 3D model. Following the completion of his photographic work, the artist destroys his carefully constructed model, leaving the only evidence of what it once was, the photographs. The process of building and destroying is a cathartic method, allowing for the artist to once again create something beautiful and new.

Thomas Demand - Grotto, 2006 (detail)
Thomas DemandGrotto (detail), 2006

Thomas Demand - Grotto, 2006 (detail) 2
Thomas DemandGrotto (detail), 2006

Thomas Demand - Processo Grottesco at Fondazione Prada
Thomas DemandGrotto (detail), 2006

Thomas Demand - Grotto, 2006, Serpentine Gallery, London
Thomas DemandGrotto, 2006, Installation at Serpentine Gallery, London

Thomas Demand - Installation at NGV National Gallery of Victoria showing, at right, Grotte : Grotto 2006
Thomas DemandGrotto, 2006, Installation at NGV National Gallery of Victoria showing at right

Thomas Demand - Processo grottesco, 2006-2007, Fondazione Prada Milano 2015
Thomas DemandProcesso grottesco, 2006-2007, Fondazione Prada Milano, Italy, 2015

Thomas Demand - Processo grottesco, 2006-2007, Fondazione Prada Milano 2015 2
Thomas DemandProcesso grottesco, 2006-2007, Fondazione Prada Milano, Italy, 2015

Thomas Demand - Processo grottesco, 2006-2007, Fondazione Prada Milano 2015 installation view
Thomas DemandProcesso grottesco, 2006-2007, Fondazione Prada Milano, Italy, 2015


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Artist covers entire museum in California with colorful tarp

Artist covers entire museum in California with colorful tarp

Susan Silton - Inside Out, 2007, site-specific installation at Pasadena Museum of California Art, vinyl tarps, sandbags, pony clips. Photo Robert Wedemeyer
Susan Silton’s exterior wrapping of the Pasadena Museum of California Art in a striped fumigation-style tent
Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Susan Silton’s piece “Inside Out “is regarded in two parts, while it is an exploration of the duality of stripes as mutually a signifier and as a extremely utilized decorative pattern. Her installation “inside” functioned as a store chock-full with numerous striped objects for sale, exposing the innocent function of stripes to decorate (and make more appealing) average consumer objects. “Outside,” covering the entire museum, laid fumigation tents frequently seen in the Los Angeles landscape covered in bright colors, and needless to say, stripes. Such tents often serve as exterior indicators of a pest infestation beneath it and are the recognized remedy for containing such infestation, however these striped fumigation tents suggest at one of the stripe’s supposed historical functions as a symbol of otherness (long ago society’s outcasts including clowns, and prostitutes were marked to wear).

It seems that both fumigation tents and stripes are related to the function of othering those contaminated, whether socially contaminated for supposed moral reasons or for reasons of infestation – either way, these serve/served to single out people who are in one way or another deemed unclean or undesirable within mainstream society. The stripe has evolved over the years into a decorative item, as is made clear with the sale items covered in bright aesthetically pleasing stripes that are pretty enough to be a candy wrapper.

Silton’s installation, more than anything else, is a social experiment or a study, looking at the evolution of semiotics in contemporary times; the representation of beauty and othering (or singling out)- and how the means of representation are interchangeable. Silton’s experiment is pure brilliance, as she demonstrates how something that once was worn as a marker of what was thought of moral depravity (such as the scarlet letter) is now on baby’s clothes, throw pillows, and other middle class furnishings. Inside Out, if anything, will leave you thinking about the ways semiotics changes through time.

Susan Silton - Inside Out, 2007, site-specific installation at Pasadena Museum of California Art, vinyl tarps, sandbags, pony clips
Susan Silton’s exterior wrapping of the Pasadena Museum of California Art in a striped fumigation-style tent

Susan Silton - Inside Out, 2007, site-specific installation at Pasadena Museum of California Art, vinyl tarps, sandbags, pony clips
Susan Silton’s exterior wrapping of the Pasadena Museum of California Art in a striped fumigation-style tent

Susan Silton - Inside Out, 2007, site-specific installation at Pasadena Museum of California Art, vinyl tarps, sandbags, pony clips
Susan Silton’s exterior wrapping of the Pasadena Museum of California Art in a striped fumigation-style tent


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Chinese artist puts 14m long minibus in MoMA and other museums

Chinese artist puts 14m long minibus in MoMA and other museums

Yin Xiuzhen - Collective Subconscious

Yin XiuzhenCollective Subconscious, 2007, Minibus, stainless steel, used clothes, stools, music
1420 x 140 x 190 cm

Collective Subconscious is a large-scale installation sculpture presented by Projects 92. It is an interactive installation created by Beijing based artist Yin Xiuzhen, who has spent the last twenty five years creating and displaying works that reflect her surrounding environment and her relationship with it. Her works are at once personal and environmentally engaging, and are typically site-specific. Collective Subconscious, which is composed of a bisected minivan connected by a long tube covered in a quilt made of found garments, allows viewers to enter and have a seat on a small bench, and listen to the Chinese pop song “Beijing, Beijing” emitting from the read-end speakers. It is ethereal and a place for contemplation, meant to break the silence traditionally present within the gallery space.

About Yin Xiuzhen

A leading figure in contemporary Chinese art, Yin Xiuzhen has worked primarily in site-specific installation and sculpture since the early 1990s. Her work addresses issues on both an environmental scale and a personal one, and often employs quotidian materials, including found textiles. Projects 92 presents her large-scale sculpture Collective Subconscious, which is composed of a bisected minivan connected by a long tube covered in a quilt made of found garments. The public is welcomed inside this transformed conveyance, where they will find a cozy refuge complete with low stools and soft pop music—a space that invites visitors to break the silence of the hushed gallery, reinventing it as a place for conversation and discussion.

Collective Subconscious has been shown at Centre Pompidou, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, NYC MoMA and other spaces.

Yin Xiuzhen - Collective Subconscious
Yin XiuzhenCollective Subconscious, 2007, Minibus, stainless steel, used clothes, stools, music
1420 x 140 x 190 cm

Yin Xiuzhen - Collective Subconscious
Yin XiuzhenCollective Subconscious, 2007, Minibus, stainless steel, used clothes, stools, music
1420 x 140 x 190 cm

aYin Xiuzhen - Collective Subconscious
Yin XiuzhenCollective Subconscious, 2007, Minibus, stainless steel, used clothes, stools, music
1420 x 140 x 190 cm

Yin Xiuzhen - Collective-Subconscious, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf
Yin XiuzhenCollective Subconscious, 2007, Minibus, stainless steel, used clothes, stools, music
1420 x 140 x 190 cm


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Sensational photos of North Korea’s mass games

Sensational photos of North Korea’s mass games

andreas-gursky-pyongyang-I1
Andreas Gursky – Pyongyang I, 2007, c-print, 307 x 215,5cm
© Andreas Gursky / VG Bild-Kunst. Courtesy: Monika Sprüth / Philomene Magers

Renowned for his large-format colour photographs charting themes of globalised society at work and play, Andreas Gursky’s production employs the digital technology to capture and refine an astounding compilation of detail on an epic scale. The perspective in many of Gursky’s photographs is drawn from an elevated vantage point. This position enables the viewer to encounter scenes, encompassing both centre and periphery, which are ordinarily beyond reach.

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Dark comic style portraits by Chinese artist

Dark comic style portraits by Chinese artist

Wang Yuping – Taoist Priest No.06, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 190x150cm
Wang Yuping – Taoist Priest No.06, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 190x150cm

Wang Yuping (b.1962, Beijing) is known for his gritty, comic book style portraits of urban life in China. His paintings are playful, feature rough, tough or absurd Beijing characters and seem to spy on life in the inner city as a kind of Wang Shuo of the art’s world. By placing us in intimate spaces with arresting, descriptive personal images, Wang Yuping continues his exploration of urban culture and social change.

He entered the Central Academy of Arts and Design in Beijing, China in 1983. Since he graduated in 1989, he has been teaching in the Oil Painting Department of CAFA. In 1997, he participated in the 47th Venice Biennial. His works have exhibited in various notable exhibitions in China and abroad and have been collected by the National Art Museum of China.

Wang Yuping - Eleven Face Guan Yin (the upper part), 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 240x190cm
Wang Yuping – Eleven Face Guan Yin (the upper part), 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 240x190cm

Wang Yuping - Dutar, 2009, oil painting and acrylic, 190x160cm
Wang Yuping – Dutar, 2009, oil painting and acrylic, 190x160cm

Wang Yuping - Eleven Face Guan Yin (the lower part), 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 240x190cm
Wang Yuping – Eleven Face Guan Yin (the lower part), 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 240x190cm

Wang Yuping - Father and Son, 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 200x160cm
Wang Yuping – Father and Son, 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 200x160cm

Wang Yuping - Master Wu, 2010, oil and acrylic on canvas, 200x160cm
Wang Yuping – Master Wu, 2010, oil and acrylic on canvas, 200x160cm

Wang Yuping - Monopolized Marriage, 2009, oil painting and acrylic, 200x230cm
Wang Yuping – Monopolized Marriage, 2009, oil painting and acrylic, 200x230cm

Wang Yuping - Taoist Priest No.02, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm
Wang Yuping – Taoist Priest No.02, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm

Wang Yuping, Taoist Priest No.03, 2005, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm
Wang Yuping, Taoist Priest No.03, 2005, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm

Wang Yuping - Taoist Priest No.05, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm
Wang Yuping – Taoist Priest No.05, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm

Wang Yuping - Taoist Priest No.05, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 190x150cm
Wang Yuping – Taoist Priest No.05, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 190x150cm

Wang Yuping - Buddha's Warrior Attendant Ha (Upper), 2011, acrylic on canvas, 190x240cm
Wang Yuping – Buddha's Warrior Attendant Ha (Upper), 2011, acrylic on canvas, 190x240cm

Wang Yuping - Life long Company, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 230x190cm
Wang Yuping – Life long Company, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 230x190cm

Wang Yuping - What a Lovely Bird, 2006, oil on canvas, 120x150cm
Wang Yuping – What a Lovely Bird, 2006, oil on canvas, 120x150cm


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