Archive: 2010
Wall in New York covered with hundreds of red tags

Wall in New York covered with hundreds of red tags

Barry McGee - Mural on Houston and Bowery, New York, 2010
Barry McGee – Detail of mural on Houston and Bowery, New York, 2010
Photo Sabeth718

In August 2010 Barry McGee (aka Twist) and Josh Lazcano (aka Amaze) painted a mural on the iconic corner of Houston & Bowery in New York’s Lower East Side, covering the wall with hundreds of red tags, filling it up with the names and crews of different graffiti writers.

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Unpredictable paintings on walls inside of museums

Unpredictable paintings on walls inside of museums

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, 2013

ADA, a kinetic sculpture by Karina Smigla-Bobinski, stands out for being interactive and unpredictable; Imagine a giant ball that is filled with helium gas and its surface covered with charcoal spikes. The helium causes the ball to be suspended in the air and the charcoal sticks provide grips and a medium with which to create art.

Through numerous exhibitions ADA is getting immense attention from visitors and the best part is, you do not have to be an artist yourself to enjoy the experience. Visitors get to push the ball which moves freely in space because it is not attached to anything and as the ball comes into contact with the surrounding walls, the charcoal sticks draw ambiguous lines on them. The result of what is drawn is never predictable and it is perhaps this feeling of suspense that keeps visitors coming back.

ADA is a transparent globe that resembles a molecular hybrid. The helium inside it and the hedgehog like surface give it an autonomous bounce from wall to wall. The ball is covered with 300 charcoal sticks with a spacing of 10 inches from one another. The technique behind it was developed by Smigla-Bobinski purposely for this art piece. Moving the ball to create patterns on the wall is interesting but what is even more enjoyable to do is to watch as people try to control the ball with their weight.

While the charcoal sticks come into contact with the white walls, every stroke is unique because of the direction in which the ball is thrust, the force applied, the level to which it is bent and the angle of contact with the wall. You will be frustrated if you approach this activity with intelligence so visitors are advised to just flow with the energy of the ball as their energy floats with it.

The artist Smigla-Bobisnki might never fully understand the therapeutic nature of what she had created but here is a canvas that was started by an expert and is being completed by anyone who has the interest and time to play with a floating ball of helium.

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, The Lowry, Manchester, UK, 2015
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, The Lowry, Manchester, UK, 2015

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, 2013

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSjajlm3Bk0


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The power of laughter

The power of laughter

Yue Minjun - One of 14 A-maze-ing Laughter bronze sculptures in Morton Park, Vancouver, BC

Yue Minjun - Untitled, stainless steel sculpture, 95x197x143cm
Yue MinjunUntitled, stainless steel sculpture, 95x197x143cm

Yue Minjun was born in Daqing in Heilongjiang, China in 1962. For most of his life, Yue moved from place to place, because his family had to move from oilfield to oilfield to find work. Before starting to work as an electrician, he graduated from Hebei Normal University in 1989, where he studied oil painting. 1989 was the same year in which China was left shocked by the infamous student-led demonstrations and the suppression of such on Tiananmen Square. These movements played a large part in the inspiration and mood of Yue’s work. In order to fight the dark mood of the hour, the dark reality of the time, he created vibrant self-images embodying an almost mania; The laughing image.

Laughter never necessarily means happiness. Laughter can be nervous. It can be spiteful. It can be healing. A smile or a laugh can be genuine but can also be a mask. They can mask feelings of loss, feelings of helplessness, feelings of confusion. Although the smile on Yue’s sculptures and paintings has often been interpreted as a joke or bliss, the meaning behind the smile often is so much deeper.

Yue was influenced by the Chinese modern art revolution, during which old ideas were being broken down and new thoughts were being created. He grew up in a time when market economic policies were beginning to release and there was accelerated development. This was also a period of global economic prosperity. These social and economic changes that were happening on a global level, especially within China pushed artists like Yue Minjun to quickly grow and evolve grow. Within this group of artists, Yue is without a doubt one of the most successful. He is also known as an influential member of the Cynical Realism movement.

His famous self-portraits take place in various settings, with an infamous expression of wide-toothed laughter. The figures featured in these self-portraits with disproportionately large faces, gleefully open mouths and eyes closed, have become recognizable to admirers around the world. Throughout his work, Yue utilizes humor as a tool to convey a tempestuous stage in modern China.

In more recent years, Yue’s sculptures have become the most famous and most visible works around the world. His sculpture A-mazing Laughter is a permanent installation in Vancouver, Canada. Yue’s Warriors were installed at LongHouse Reserve in New York.

In portraying himself within his paintings he allows himself more freedom of expression. Through this expression he is able to look at himself and society. He has the ability to question reality, and the laugh that is portrayed in his portraits and sculptures is one that is relatable for his countrymen and women who have experienced the changes in society. The smile that is so large and convincing often has something else behind it. Sometimes in any given situation all we can really do is smile.

Yue Minjun - A-Maze-ing Laughter, Vancouver 1
Yue MinjunA-Maze-ing Laughter, Vancouver, Canada

Yue Minjun - A-Maze-ing Laughter, Vancouver 2
Yue MinjunA-Maze-ing Laughter, Vancouver, Canada

Yue Minjun - A-Maze-ing Laughter, Vancouver 3
Yue MinjunA-Maze-ing Laughter, Vancouver, Canada

Yue Minjun - A-Maze-ing Laughter, Vancouver
Yue MinjunA-Maze-ing Laughter, Vancouver, Canada

Yue Minjun - Amazing Laughter, 2009, Photo Matthew Grapengieser
Yue MinjunA-Maze-ing Laughter, Vancouver, Canada
Photo: Matthew Grapengieser

Yue Minjun - Amazing Laughter, 2009
Yue MinjunA-Maze-ing Laughter, Vancouver, Canada

Yue Minjun - Today Art Museum
Yue Minjun – Today Art Museum, Beijing, China

Yue Minjun - Beijing, China, Photo by Jason Lee/Reuters
Yue Minjun – Today Art Museum, Beijing, China
Photo by Jason Lee/Reuters

Yue Minjun - Contemporary Terracotta Warriors 2000 Fiberglass, paint, iron base, 60x53x186cm, 2000
Yue MinjunContemporary Terracotta Warriors, 2000, Fiberglass, paint, iron base, 60x53x186cm

Yue Minjun - Contemporary Terracotta Warriors Series No. 6, 2005, Bronze, 46x61x288cm
Yue MinjunContemporary Terracotta Warriors No. 6, 2005, Bronze, 46x61x288cm

Yue Minjun - Contemporary Terracotta Warriors No. 9, 2006, Set of 25, Bronze, 190.5x61x61cm
Yue MinjunContemporary Terracotta Warriors No. 9, 2006, Set of 25, Bronze, 190,5x61x61cm

Yue Minjun - Contemporary Terracotta Warriors, 2005, installation view, Pete and Repeat, 2009 at Zabludowicz Collection, London. Photo- Thierry Bal
Yue MinjunContemporary Terracotta Warriors, 2005, Zabludowicz Collection, London, 2009
Photo: Thierry Bal

Yue Minjun - Contemporary Terracotta Warriors, 2005 (detail)
Yue MinjunContemporary Terracotta Warriors (detail), 2005

Yue Minjun - Contemporary Terracotta Warriors, 2005, LongHouse Reserve garden, East Hampton, NY, USA
Yue MinjunContemporary Terracotta Warriors, 2005, LongHouse Reserve garden, East Hampton, NY, USA

Yue Minjun - Contemporary Terracotta Warriors, Chatsworth House
Yue MinjunContemporary Terracotta Warriors, Chatsworth House, United Kingdom

Yue Minjun - Contemporary Terracotta Warriors, Chatsworth House 2
Yue MinjunContemporary Terracotta Warriors, Chatsworth House, United Kingdom

Yue Minjun - Flexible Latitude 2010
Yue MinjunFlexible Latitude, 2010

Yue Minjun - Laugh 2, 2009 Stainless steel, iron 200 x 80 x 80 cm
Yue MinjunLaugh 2, 2009, Stainless steel, iron 200x80x80cm

Yue Minjun - Milwaukee Art Museum 1
Yue MinjunChinese Contemporary Warriors, at Milwaukee Art Museum, USA, 2011

Yue Minjun - Milwaukee Art Museum 2
Yue MinjunChinese Contemporary Warriors, at Milwaukee Art Museum, USA, 2011

Yue Minjun - One of 14 A-maze-ing Laughter bronze sculptures in Morton Park, Vancouver, BC
Yue Minjun – One of 14 A-maze-ing Laughter bronze sculptures in Morton Park, Vancouver, BC

Yue Minjun - The Tao of Laughter, Harbour City – Part II , Hong Kong, 2012 2
Yue MinjunThe Tao of Laughter, Harbour City, Hong Kong, 2012

Yue Minjun - The Tao of Laughter, Harbour City – Part II , Hong Kong, 2012 3
Yue MinjunThe Tao of Laughter, Harbour City, Hong Kong, 2012

Yue Minjun - The Tao of Laughter, Harbour City – Part II , Hong Kong, 2012 4
Yue MinjunThe Tao of Laughter, Harbour City, Hong Kong, 2012

Yue Minjun - The Tao of Laughter, Harbour City – Part II , Hong Kong, 2012 5
Yue MinjunThe Tao of Laughter, Harbour City, Hong Kong, 2012

Yue Minjun - The Tao of Laughter, Harbour City – Part II , Hong Kong, 2012 6
Yue MinjunThe Tao of Laughter, Harbour City, Hong Kong, 2012

Yue Minjun - The Tao of Laughter, Harbour City – Part II , Hong Kong, 2012 7
Yue MinjunThe Tao of Laughter, Harbour City, Hong Kong, 2012

Yue Minjun - The Tao of Laughter, Harbour City – Part II , Hong Kong, 2012
Yue MinjunThe Tao of Laughter, Harbour City, Hong Kong, 2012


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Dreamlike video work situated in 1930s Shanghai is both frighteningly beautiful and elegant (video)

Dreamlike video work situated in 1930s Shanghai is both frighteningly beautiful and elegant (video)

Yang Fudong - Fifth Night Part 1, 2010, 7 channel video installation, 35 mm film B & W, stereo sound, 35mm - Still 4
Yang FudongFifth Night Part 1, 2010, 7 channel video installation, 35 mm film B & W, stereo sound, 35mm

China’s most well-known cinematographer and photographer, Yang Fudong, was born in Beijing, China, in 1971. He is also regarded by many as one of the greatest film writers to come out of China, however his creativity spans far beyond that. Yang began training in painting at the China Academy of Fine Arts in Hangzhou, and started working with film in the early 1990s. He now uses images to depict thought and experience, and he seeks to portray that anything is possible, including dreams and fantasies.

Yang films are generally considered to be poetic because of his style and the raw beauty of his work – playing off the thoughts and experiences of the profane. His video installation Fifth Night Part 1 depicts the same scene captured from seven different vantage points, or more like seven different perspectives. And yet these very different (but the same) perspectives or pieces are then puzzled together in order to demonstrate a fractured yet complete scene that is played access seven screens.

The seven screens that Yang uses form seven scrolls sharing the personal and intimate stories (and temporal journeys) of seven young people in 1930s Shanghai are told in a compressive dreamlike fashion. It is though each step of these young peoples story that we are gradually let into their dreams and desires in order to visualize their stories. The dreamlike quality of Yang’s works is what seems to suck you in as an audience member, in an otherworldly experience, communicating with the characters, joining them in their journey in a frighteningly beautiful and elegant temporary world. As you jump from one perspective or story to another, you feel a sense of what had just happened a breath before becomes a sense of the past, a mere memory.

Yang Fudong - Fifth Night Part 1, 2010, 7 channel video installation, 35 mm film B & W, stereo sound, 35mm - Still 1
Yang FudongFifth Night Part 1, 2010, 7 channel video installation, 35 mm film B & W, stereo sound, 35mm

Yang Fudong - Fifth Night Part 1, 2010, 7 channel video installation, 35 mm film B & W, stereo sound, 35mm - Still 2
Yang FudongFifth Night Part 1, 2010, 7 channel video installation, 35 mm film B & W, stereo sound, 35mm

Yang Fudong - Fifth Night Part 1, 2010, 7 channel video installation, 35 mm film B & W, stereo sound, 35mm - Still 3
Yang FudongFifth Night Part 1, 2010, 7 channel video installation, 35 mm film B & W, stereo sound, 35mm

Yang Fudong - Fifth Night Part 1, 2010, installation view at Marian Goodman Gallery, 2012
Yang FudongFifth Night Part 1, 2010, 7 channel video installation, 35 mm film B & W, stereo sound, 35mm at Marian Goodman Gallery, 2012

Yang Fudong - Fifth Night Part 1, 2010, installation view at Vancouver Art Gallery, 2012
Yang FudongFifth Night Part 1, 2010, 7 channel video installation, 35 mm film B & W, stereo sound, 35mm, at Vancouver Art Gallery, 2012

Video

Video

https://vimeo.com/40177158


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You won’t find these tapestries in any church (NSFW)

You won’t find these tapestries in any church (NSFW)

Erin M Riley - Self Portrait 2, 72 x 48 inch, 2015

Erin M. RileySelf Portrait 2, 2015, Hand woven tapestry, hand dyed wool on a cotton warp, 182.9 x 121.9 cm

Is there a better reflection of a culture than the creatives living in it? From painters to photographers to poets, the voice of our moment is often told most aptly and timelessly through what they create. The same goes for Erin M. Riley. She has taken a look at both her own and the collective conscious of the individuals of today and laid what she sees for all to witness. 

She creates tapestries depicting occasionally controversial subject matter involving porn, guns and drugs. Her work has been featured in magazines and shown at numerous galleries both in her home country of the US as well as internationally.

Having just recently come across Erin’s work, I was full of questions- hard, silly and serious. I reached out to her in the end of 2015. This is the conversation that followed.

Phil America

Let’s start from the beginning. How did you first learn to start weaving?

I found weaving in college. I was interested in sewing and painting, and the fibers major was something that sat perfectly between those two. I could learn construction alongside fine art sensibilities. Weaving was a process I had no knowledge of and I connected instantly with it.

From there how did you progress into having a specific style?

I learned “tapestry” early on and was weaving abstract pieces while also making lots of paper collage work out of found and family photographs that used the silhouette a lot. These eventually led me to combining the two, making simple drawings that I translated into tapestry using a very limited color palette. This progressed and eventually I was using found and photographs I was taking for the work.

Marshall McLuhan famously said, “the medium is the message.” How does the medium you choose to work with inform the subtext of the image?

Weaving is just another way to arrange color on a 2 dimensional surface. I am an image maker. Think of me as a painter who uses yarn.

Erin M Riley - Alone Alone, 48 x 37 inch, 2014

Erin M. RileyAlone Alone, 2014, Hand woven tapestry, hand dyed wool on a cotton warp, 121.9 x 94 cm

Erin M Riley - Loot 5, 42 x 26 inch, 2012

Erin M. RileyLoot 5, 2012, Hand woven tapestry, hand dyed wool on a cotton warp, 106.7 x 66 cm

I know you told me before but how long does each piece take you, roughly, and do you ever get halfway done with a piece and scrap it?

I have only stopped two pieces, one because I had to move my loom and another because it was to small to get the detail I wanted. My work takes from a week to a month to weave, I work 12-14 hour days, every day and I also mix and dye my colors, plus all other prep.

I am really fascinated by how much work goes into each one. A lot of other artists do similar work to yours by designing it digitally. Can you explain
the process of creating one of your works?

There is either digitally woven work or work that is hired out. I work from images so I collect or take photos for an upcoming piece, blow it up to scale and start a line drawing that will be pinned behind the warp on the loom. I collect and prepare colors for the pieces and get everything ready to start weaving, after that its just a slow and steady process of weaving the image from the bottom up. Historically tapestry is woven side to side but I weave bottom to top.

Why do you choose using images of guns and porn rather than flowers or other imagery traditionally seen in tapestry?

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Gigantic breathing lotus flowers by Korean artist

Gigantic breathing lotus flowers by Korean artist

Choi Jeong Hwa - Perth International Art Festival - Moving Flower, 2012
Choi Jeong Hwa – Moving Flower, Perth International Art Festival, Australia, 2012

Korean artist and designer Choi Jeong Hwa is mostly known for his large lotus blossoms. With motorized fabric leaves opening and closing, simulating the movement of a live lotus flower, his sculptures are often installed in public space and create a link between the modern world and one of the most important cosmological symbols in Asia.

Check out the videos below to see his lotus blossoms in action or read more about Choi’s latest installation in Hong Kong.

About Choi Jeong Hwa

Choi Jeong Hwa is an artist and designer who works across many disciplines including art, graphic design, industrial design and architecture, using a broad range of media involving video, molded plastic, shopping trolleys, real and fake food, lights, wires and kitsch Korean artifacts. His playful practice comments on the privileged environment of art institutions and questions the prized status of artworks amidst a consumer-frenzied world.

Choi has participated in many biennials of contemporary art, including the Arsenale Kyiv (2012), the 17th Sydney Biennial (2010), the Gwangju Biennale (2006), the Venice Biennale – Korean pavilion (2005), the CP Biennale (2005), the Liverpool Biennial (2004), the Lyon Biennale (2003), the Yokohama Triennale (2001), the São Paulo Biennale (1998) and the Taipei Biennale (1998). Choi Jeong Hwa was born 1961 in Seoul, Korea. He lives and works in Seoul.

Choi Jeong Hwa - Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - Breathing Flower, 2016
Choi Jeong Hwa – Breathing Flower, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, USA, 2016, Photo by Cassidy Hopkins

Choi Jeong Hwa - Civic Center Plaza San Francisco - Breathing Flower, 2012
Choi Jeong Hwa – Breathing Flower, Civic Center Plaza, San Francisco, USA, 2012

Choi Jeong Hwa - Civic Center Plaza San Francisco - Breathing Flower, 2012
Choi Jeong Hwa – Breathing Flower, Civic Center Plaza, San Francisco, USA, 2012

Choi Jeong Hwa - Kunsthalle Gwangju - Breathing Flower 거시기 What Is It, 2011
Choi Jeong Hwa – Breathing Flower 거시기 What Is It, Kunsthalle Gwangju, South Korea, 2011

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Dark comic style portraits by Chinese artist

Dark comic style portraits by Chinese artist

Wang Yuping – Taoist Priest No.06, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 190x150cm
Wang Yuping – Taoist Priest No.06, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 190x150cm

Wang Yuping (b.1962, Beijing) is known for his gritty, comic book style portraits of urban life in China. His paintings are playful, feature rough, tough or absurd Beijing characters and seem to spy on life in the inner city as a kind of Wang Shuo of the art’s world. By placing us in intimate spaces with arresting, descriptive personal images, Wang Yuping continues his exploration of urban culture and social change.

He entered the Central Academy of Arts and Design in Beijing, China in 1983. Since he graduated in 1989, he has been teaching in the Oil Painting Department of CAFA. In 1997, he participated in the 47th Venice Biennial. His works have exhibited in various notable exhibitions in China and abroad and have been collected by the National Art Museum of China.

Wang Yuping - Eleven Face Guan Yin (the upper part), 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 240x190cm
Wang Yuping – Eleven Face Guan Yin (the upper part), 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 240x190cm

Wang Yuping - Dutar, 2009, oil painting and acrylic, 190x160cm
Wang Yuping – Dutar, 2009, oil painting and acrylic, 190x160cm

Wang Yuping - Eleven Face Guan Yin (the lower part), 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 240x190cm
Wang Yuping – Eleven Face Guan Yin (the lower part), 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 240x190cm

Wang Yuping - Father and Son, 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 200x160cm
Wang Yuping – Father and Son, 2010, oil painting and acrylic, 200x160cm

Wang Yuping - Master Wu, 2010, oil and acrylic on canvas, 200x160cm
Wang Yuping – Master Wu, 2010, oil and acrylic on canvas, 200x160cm

Wang Yuping - Monopolized Marriage, 2009, oil painting and acrylic, 200x230cm
Wang Yuping – Monopolized Marriage, 2009, oil painting and acrylic, 200x230cm

Wang Yuping - Taoist Priest No.02, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm
Wang Yuping – Taoist Priest No.02, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm

Wang Yuping, Taoist Priest No.03, 2005, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm
Wang Yuping, Taoist Priest No.03, 2005, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm

Wang Yuping - Taoist Priest No.05, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm
Wang Yuping – Taoist Priest No.05, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 150x120cm

Wang Yuping - Taoist Priest No.05, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 190x150cm
Wang Yuping – Taoist Priest No.05, 2007, oil painting and acrylic, 190x150cm

Wang Yuping - Buddha's Warrior Attendant Ha (Upper), 2011, acrylic on canvas, 190x240cm
Wang Yuping – Buddha's Warrior Attendant Ha (Upper), 2011, acrylic on canvas, 190x240cm

Wang Yuping - Life long Company, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 230x190cm
Wang Yuping – Life long Company, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 230x190cm

Wang Yuping - What a Lovely Bird, 2006, oil on canvas, 120x150cm
Wang Yuping – What a Lovely Bird, 2006, oil on canvas, 120x150cm


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