Archive: 2013
Unpredictable paintings on walls inside of museums

Unpredictable paintings on walls inside of museums

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, 2013

ADA, a kinetic sculpture by Karina Smigla-Bobinski, stands out for being interactive and unpredictable; Imagine a giant ball that is filled with helium gas and its surface covered with charcoal spikes. The helium causes the ball to be suspended in the air and the charcoal sticks provide grips and a medium with which to create art.

Through numerous exhibitions ADA is getting immense attention from visitors and the best part is, you do not have to be an artist yourself to enjoy the experience. Visitors get to push the ball which moves freely in space because it is not attached to anything and as the ball comes into contact with the surrounding walls, the charcoal sticks draw ambiguous lines on them. The result of what is drawn is never predictable and it is perhaps this feeling of suspense that keeps visitors coming back.

ADA is a transparent globe that resembles a molecular hybrid. The helium inside it and the hedgehog like surface give it an autonomous bounce from wall to wall. The ball is covered with 300 charcoal sticks with a spacing of 10 inches from one another. The technique behind it was developed by Smigla-Bobinski purposely for this art piece. Moving the ball to create patterns on the wall is interesting but what is even more enjoyable to do is to watch as people try to control the ball with their weight.

While the charcoal sticks come into contact with the white walls, every stroke is unique because of the direction in which the ball is thrust, the force applied, the level to which it is bent and the angle of contact with the wall. You will be frustrated if you approach this activity with intelligence so visitors are advised to just flow with the energy of the ball as their energy floats with it.

The artist Smigla-Bobisnki might never fully understand the therapeutic nature of what she had created but here is a canvas that was started by an expert and is being completed by anyone who has the interest and time to play with a floating ball of helium.

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, The Lowry, Manchester, UK, 2015
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, The Lowry, Manchester, UK, 2015

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, 2013

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSjajlm3Bk0


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Artist mocks Koons highest priced work using garbage bags

Artist mocks Koons highest priced work using garbage bags

Gimhongsok - Canine Construction, 2009, bronze
GimhongsokCanine Construction, 2009, 164x231x90cm

This Canine Construction by South Korean artist, Gimhongsok is one that anyone would fall in love with, coupled with the enigmatic quality it has. This work is the sculpture of a dog remains one of the artist’s most well-known works in recent times. The creation involved using garbage bags, balloons, cardboard boxes, all assembled with expensive materials like resin.

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Artist got enormous meteorite on eBay for this installation

Artist got enormous meteorite on eBay for this installation

Chris Burden - Porsche with Meteorite, 2013, Photo by Benoit Pailley/New Museum
Chris BurdenPorsche with Meteorite, 2013, restored 1974 Porsche 914, 390 pound meteorite, steel structure installation, New Museum, New York City, USA, 2013
Photo: Benoit Pailley, New Museum

Chris Burden was not exactly an everyday artist. While his previous work usually involved a form of danger (see Shoot), his last works have still been about performance, but mostly involved creating very much advanced models of working machines. One of such of his works was sitting in the New Museum, NYC in 2013. At the New Museum, there was a large chunk of meteorite which weighed 365 pounds hanging from one end of a massive steel frame while a Canary yellow 1974 Porsche 914 hung from the other end.

Burden went to great lengths to make his machines come to live and a great deal of energy and intelligence is required. According to the story of how the meteorite machine came to be, Burden spotted the huge meteorite on eBay and it was available on free shipping too. He had never seen a meteorite that big and he went ahead to buy it without actually having any inkling whatsoever about what he would do with it.

Chris Burden whose most well-known work is Shoot, an art performance in which he had his own arm shot by a friend in 1971, had over the years grown into a stocky, vigorous 67 years old man. His works were usually huge and they always took very long time to bring to life but there is a clean elegance about them which Mr. Burden said he imbibed from the University of California.

Chris Burden - Porsche with Meteorite (2013), Gagosian Gallery, Paris, France, 2015, Photo Sophie Kitching, Art Observed 1
Chris BurdenPorsche with Meteorite, 2013, restored 1974 Porsche 914, 390 pound meteorite, steel structure installation, Gagosian Gallery, Paris, France, 2015
Photo Sophie Kitching, Art Observed

Chris Burden - Porsche with Meteorite (2013), Gagosian Gallery, Paris, France, 2015, Photo Sophie Kitching, Art Observed 2
Chris BurdenPorsche with Meteorite, 2013, restored 1974 Porsche 914, 390 pound meteorite, steel structure installation, Gagosian Gallery, Paris, France, 2015
Photo: Sophie Kitching, Art Observed

Chris Burden - Porsche with Meteorite (2013), Gagosian Gallery, Paris, France, 2015, Photo Sophie Kitching, Art Observed
Chris BurdenPorsche with Meteorite, 2013, restored 1974 Porsche 914, 390 pound meteorite, steel structure installation, Gagosian Gallery, Paris, France, 2015
Photo: Sophie Kitching, Art Observed

Chris Burden - Porsche with Meteorite (2013), Gagosian Gallery, Paris, France, 2015, Photo Sophie Kitching, Art Observed detail
Chris BurdenPorsche with Meteorite, 2013, restored 1974 Porsche 914, 390 pound meteorite, steel structure installation, Gagosian Gallery, Paris, France, 2015
Photo: Sophie Kitching, Art Observed

Chris Burden – Porsche with Meteorite, 2013, installation view at the artist’s studio in Topanga, CA – photo Brian Forrest
Chris BurdenPorsche with Meteorite, 2013, restored 1974 Porsche 914, 390 pound meteorite, steel structure installation, installation view at the artist’s studio in Topanga, California, USA
Photo: Brian Forrest


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Spray paint & Old Masters create an interesting mix

Spray paint & Old Masters create an interesting mix

Miaz Brothers - Young Man 6, 130x99cm

Miaz Brothers - Master 8, 2013, 190x140cm, Acrylic on canvas
Miaz BrothersMaster 8, 2013, 190x140cm

The Miaz Brothers present a drastic new interpretation of portraiture, as the siblings, create large-format canvases using spray paint in a unique new way. Their series with the Masters focuses on the historic and notable figures from the time of the English Restoration, while evoking a new take on the Masters.

They explain that the use of spray paint is representative that we, as humans, “are composed of infinite particles in continuous evolution”. The spray paint creates a blurred effect that expresses the duo’s work: “dematerializing the lines, we gain a substantial indetermination of the picture. This skips any immediate reaction and provokes the viewer to use mnemonic associations instead for their own personal visual information encoding.”

The Miaz Brothers have a very particular method to their art; their style elements are dichotomized and further enact the concepts of temporality and transcendence. The Miaz brother’s paintings are made up of large haunting portraits, of ghostly figures that are only just visible. These works are based on the Old Masters, and with little more than that information, the viewers are given all that is needed to complete the narrative.

Their otherworldly work is without a doubt evocative and highlights our transitory actuality, and the interchange that is existence. The Miaz brothers also bring into conversation the many ideas surrounding perception and how each person’s perception varies from person to person so drastically. Every viewer sees precisely what they want or need to when viewing the portraits, whether they see a historical figure, or someone they know, each person projects their own associations and perceptions on to the blurred canvas. This is what is so refreshing about the Miaz brothers, they don’t tell you what to see, think, or feel- it is up to you to interpret the artwork, and no matter how you do, you are right.

Miaz Brothers - Young Woman 2, 163x130cm
Miaz BrothersYoung Woman 2, 163x130cm

Miaz Brothers - Young Man 6, 130x99cm
Miaz BrothersYoung Man 6, 130x99cm

Miaz Brothers - Young Man 2, 163x130cm
Miaz BrothersYoung Man 2, 163x130cm

Miaz Brothers - Old Master 16, 2014, 130x100cm, Acrylic on canvas
Miaz BrothersOld Master 16, 130x100cm

Miaz Brothers - Old master #31, 2014, 162x130cm
Miaz BrothersOld Master 31, 162x130cm

Miaz Brothers - Old master #30, 2014, 162x130cm
Miaz BrothersOld Master 30, 162x130cm

Miaz Brothers - Old master #19, 2014, 162 x 130 cm
Miaz BrothersOld Master 19, 2013, 162x130cm

Miaz Brothers - Old Man 4, 162x130cm
Miaz BrothersOld Man 4, 162x130cm

Miaz Brothers - Lady F, 2014, 162x130cm
Miaz BrothersLady F, 2014, 162x130cm


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This gruesome-looking installation is much more harmless than you think

This gruesome-looking installation is much more harmless than you think

Imran Qureshi – And They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013 - Salsali Private Museum, Dubai, UAE, 2014

Imran Qureshi – And They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013 - Salsali Private Museum, Dubai, UAE, 2014
Imran QureshiAnd They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013, At Salsali Private Museum, Dubai, UAE, 2014
Photo: Salsali Private Museum

Imran Qureshi’s “And they still seek the traces of blood” (2013) has become renowned for its ability to invoke emotional responses from viewers as this intrinsic work is printed on thousands of crumpled sheets of paper and gathered to form a precipitous heap. The title of his work, “nd they still seek the traces of blood quotes a poem by Faiz Ahmed Faiz with reference to individuals who have been killed and buried without their lives honoured nor the events surrounding their deaths investigated.

The Pakistani artist Qureshi’s work is in reference to current events in Pakistan and serves to highlight the types of violence and discrimination that is imposed upon innocent people around the world every day. Qureshi’s work is visually striking while it calls forth profound imagery of violence. The use of light and darkness in the surrounding hall makes his work emotionally charged and as described by some viewers almost brutal.

Qureshi’s exhibition uses the binary combination of light and darkness. Qureshi utilizes the color of the rooms of the nighttime landscapes of Venetian painting, often depicting landscapes and interior courtyards in which every stone and leaf is pedantically arranged; each delicate painting is tainted by the blood red stains that impinges on the picturesque scene, uncompromisingly annihilating the delicacy and balance. In doing this, Qureshi creates a space of binary elements, beauty and violence.

Throughout these somber rooms you have to carefully feel your way slowly and cautiously; as Qureshi’s method of presentation causes for the make references to the colonial architectures and domains in which servants were kept in small compartments. Through the surrounding darkness the paintings burn into the viewers provoking them to reflect upon the conditions as they attempt to discover a way out of the labyrinth of depicted violence or to create a split second in which viewers can escape the perpetual succession of creation and violence.

Qureshi’s work reflects upon his own lived experience, expressing the memories of his living through decades of precarity, martial law, uprisings and massacres, terrorism, political. His artwork is without a doubt metaphorical expressing both life and death, darkness and light. His work is so completely profound as the metaphorical and binary nature of his work is infinite, depicting a teetering balance of beauty and life versus the dark blood red spattered imagery associated with violence and death.

Imran Qureshi, And They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2014
Imran QureshiAnd They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013, At Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University, 2014
Photo: Aaron Word. Courtesy the artist and Corvi-Mora, London

Imran Qureshi – And They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013
Imran QureshiAnd They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013, At Ikon Gallery, Birmingham, UK

Imran Qureshi, And They Still Seek The Traces Of Blood
Imran QureshiAnd They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013, At M HKA, Museum of Contemporary Art Antwerp, Belgium
Photo: M HKA

Imran Qureshi - And they still seek the traces of blood, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Nuit Blanche Paris 2014
Imran QureshiAnd They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013, At M HKA, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Nuit Blanche Paris, 2014

Imran Qureshi - And they still seek the traces of blood, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Nuit Blanche Paris 2014
Imran QureshiAnd They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013, At M HKA, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Nuit Blanche Paris, 2014

Imran Qureshi - And they still seek the traces of blood, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Nuit Blanche Paris 2014
Imran QureshiAnd They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013, At M HKA, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Nuit Blanche Paris, 2014

Imran Qureshi - And they still seek the traces of blood, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Nuit Blanche Paris 2014
Imran QureshiAnd They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013, At M HKA, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Nuit Blanche Paris, 2014

Imran Qureshi - And they still seek the traces of blood, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Nuit Blanche Paris 2014
Imran QureshiAnd They Still Seek the Traces of Blood, 2013, At M HKA, Bibliotheque Sainte Genevieve, Nuit Blanche Paris, 2014


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Chinese artist puts 14m long minibus in MoMA and other museums

Chinese artist puts 14m long minibus in MoMA and other museums

Yin Xiuzhen - Collective Subconscious

Yin XiuzhenCollective Subconscious, 2007, Minibus, stainless steel, used clothes, stools, music
1420 x 140 x 190 cm

Collective Subconscious is a large-scale installation sculpture presented by Projects 92. It is an interactive installation created by Beijing based artist Yin Xiuzhen, who has spent the last twenty five years creating and displaying works that reflect her surrounding environment and her relationship with it. Her works are at once personal and environmentally engaging, and are typically site-specific. Collective Subconscious, which is composed of a bisected minivan connected by a long tube covered in a quilt made of found garments, allows viewers to enter and have a seat on a small bench, and listen to the Chinese pop song “Beijing, Beijing” emitting from the read-end speakers. It is ethereal and a place for contemplation, meant to break the silence traditionally present within the gallery space.

About Yin Xiuzhen

A leading figure in contemporary Chinese art, Yin Xiuzhen has worked primarily in site-specific installation and sculpture since the early 1990s. Her work addresses issues on both an environmental scale and a personal one, and often employs quotidian materials, including found textiles. Projects 92 presents her large-scale sculpture Collective Subconscious, which is composed of a bisected minivan connected by a long tube covered in a quilt made of found garments. The public is welcomed inside this transformed conveyance, where they will find a cozy refuge complete with low stools and soft pop music—a space that invites visitors to break the silence of the hushed gallery, reinventing it as a place for conversation and discussion.

Collective Subconscious has been shown at Centre Pompidou, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, NYC MoMA and other spaces.

Yin Xiuzhen - Collective Subconscious
Yin XiuzhenCollective Subconscious, 2007, Minibus, stainless steel, used clothes, stools, music
1420 x 140 x 190 cm

Yin Xiuzhen - Collective Subconscious
Yin XiuzhenCollective Subconscious, 2007, Minibus, stainless steel, used clothes, stools, music
1420 x 140 x 190 cm

aYin Xiuzhen - Collective Subconscious
Yin XiuzhenCollective Subconscious, 2007, Minibus, stainless steel, used clothes, stools, music
1420 x 140 x 190 cm

Yin Xiuzhen - Collective-Subconscious, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf
Yin XiuzhenCollective Subconscious, 2007, Minibus, stainless steel, used clothes, stools, music
1420 x 140 x 190 cm


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You won’t find these tapestries in any church (NSFW)

You won’t find these tapestries in any church (NSFW)

Erin M Riley - Self Portrait 2, 72 x 48 inch, 2015

Erin M. RileySelf Portrait 2, 2015, Hand woven tapestry, hand dyed wool on a cotton warp, 182.9 x 121.9 cm

Is there a better reflection of a culture than the creatives living in it? From painters to photographers to poets, the voice of our moment is often told most aptly and timelessly through what they create. The same goes for Erin M. Riley. She has taken a look at both her own and the collective conscious of the individuals of today and laid what she sees for all to witness. 

She creates tapestries depicting occasionally controversial subject matter involving porn, guns and drugs. Her work has been featured in magazines and shown at numerous galleries both in her home country of the US as well as internationally.

Having just recently come across Erin’s work, I was full of questions- hard, silly and serious. I reached out to her in the end of 2015. This is the conversation that followed.

Phil America

Let’s start from the beginning. How did you first learn to start weaving?

I found weaving in college. I was interested in sewing and painting, and the fibers major was something that sat perfectly between those two. I could learn construction alongside fine art sensibilities. Weaving was a process I had no knowledge of and I connected instantly with it.

From there how did you progress into having a specific style?

I learned “tapestry” early on and was weaving abstract pieces while also making lots of paper collage work out of found and family photographs that used the silhouette a lot. These eventually led me to combining the two, making simple drawings that I translated into tapestry using a very limited color palette. This progressed and eventually I was using found and photographs I was taking for the work.

Marshall McLuhan famously said, “the medium is the message.” How does the medium you choose to work with inform the subtext of the image?

Weaving is just another way to arrange color on a 2 dimensional surface. I am an image maker. Think of me as a painter who uses yarn.

Erin M Riley - Alone Alone, 48 x 37 inch, 2014

Erin M. RileyAlone Alone, 2014, Hand woven tapestry, hand dyed wool on a cotton warp, 121.9 x 94 cm

Erin M Riley - Loot 5, 42 x 26 inch, 2012

Erin M. RileyLoot 5, 2012, Hand woven tapestry, hand dyed wool on a cotton warp, 106.7 x 66 cm

I know you told me before but how long does each piece take you, roughly, and do you ever get halfway done with a piece and scrap it?

I have only stopped two pieces, one because I had to move my loom and another because it was to small to get the detail I wanted. My work takes from a week to a month to weave, I work 12-14 hour days, every day and I also mix and dye my colors, plus all other prep.

I am really fascinated by how much work goes into each one. A lot of other artists do similar work to yours by designing it digitally. Can you explain
the process of creating one of your works?

There is either digitally woven work or work that is hired out. I work from images so I collect or take photos for an upcoming piece, blow it up to scale and start a line drawing that will be pinned behind the warp on the loom. I collect and prepare colors for the pieces and get everything ready to start weaving, after that its just a slow and steady process of weaving the image from the bottom up. Historically tapestry is woven side to side but I weave bottom to top.

Why do you choose using images of guns and porn rather than flowers or other imagery traditionally seen in tapestry?

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