Archive: Architecture
Artist creates tiny house & paddles away in the ocean

Artist creates tiny house & paddles away in the ocean

Kacey Wong - Paddling Home, 2009 1
Kacey WongPaddling Home, 2009, wood, ceramic tiles, aluminum windows, stainless steel gate, pipes, plastic barrels, 278 x 220 x 290cm, Hong Kong

Kacey Wong has a knack for creating art which investigates the space between people and their surrounding environment. Paddling Home, which was performed on the Hong Kong Victoria Harbor, was a star feature in the Hong Kong contemporary art scene. The project features deep architectural elements, which clearly show in the design. The project also features various functional and commercial aspects. The result of the Paddling Home house was the creation of artwork unbounded by business values or functionality, which allowed it to represent the philosophies of Kacey Wong.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment
Pyongyang interiors in unexpected and bizarre colors

Pyongyang interiors in unexpected and bizarre colors

Oliver Wainwright - National Drama Theatre, Pyongyang
Oliver WainwrightNational Drama Theatre, Pyongyang, 2015

Oliver Wainwright North Korean Interiors documents the unique architecture and the interiors of various regions of North Korea and its capital Pyongyang. Not many photographers get the opportunity to explore this isolated country owing to its closed state; however, Wainwright took the opportunity and ran with it. The interiors that he documented were very kitsch and retro as they were originally created to adorn important theaters and buildings that were designed during the Soviet era.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Calm photos of Pyongyang, the ultimate socialist city

Calm photos of Pyongyang, the ultimate socialist city

North Korea - Setting the Stage - Pyongyang - Pyongyang women 01

North Korea - Setting the Stage - Pyongyang - Pyongyang women 01
Eddo HartmannSetting the Stage: Pyongyang – Pyongyang women 01, 2014

North Korea is known for its fascination and terror in the same measure. Most of the world knows North Korea for its former leader Kim Jong II and the current Kim Jong Un. However, the fascinating thing about Pyongyang is its architecture.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment
Humans reduced to a blob of color

Humans reduced to a blob of color

Andreas Gursky - Kuwait Stock Exchange, 2007

Andreas Gursky - Kuwait Stock Exchange II, 2007
Andreas GurskyKuwait Stock Exchange II, 2007
Photo: Andreas Gursky/VG Bild-Kunst, Courtesy Sprüth Magers, Berlin London

Andreas Gursky is a German photographer and professor. He is most well known for large format architecture and landscape color photos, and following the 1990’s; Gursky has been using technology and computers for editing and enhancing his photos.

Gursky is known for using an elevated vantage point as his main perspective. This allows the audience to view the scenes from a place that is both peripheral and central. Using each subject to create an unconventional geometry, he organizes the world fitting in with his personal visual logic. He began his portrayals of stock exchanges in 1990 and has continued this project throughout his career.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Prohibited photos from world’s most isolated country

Prohibited photos from world’s most isolated country

Michal Huniewicz - North Korea - Pyongyang
Michal HuniewiczOstensibly Ordinary: Pyongyang
Inhabitants of Pyongyang commuting.

A lot of attention was recently drawn to a series of photographs taken by London-based photographer Michal Huniewicz. These photographs are somewhat prohibited as they show the real side of North Korea. Tourists who want to visit North Korea are only allowed to do so through pre-arranged tours booked via travel agencies. When they arrive, there will be tour guides who will be with them at all times throughout their stay in the country. It is quite normal for tour guides to be assigned to tourists so as to ease their movements and make the tour a worthy experience but truthfully, the main job of tour guides in North Korea is to prevent tourists from interacting with locals, to prevent them from taking pictures and keep them away from areas where there is a high rate of poverty and unhappiness. Tourists are not allowed to take photos of soldiers and there are certain places where cameras are not allowed to be used.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Colorful life-sized recreation of entire apartment

Colorful life-sized recreation of entire apartment

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, at MOCA Cleveland, 2015, Photo Jerry Birchfield 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

South Korean artist Do Ho Suh created an installation based on his New York home. It serves to highlight the permeable margins that are said to disconnect private and public in addition to the normalized concepts global identity, space and place, diasporic movement, memory, and displacement. Do Ho Su’s biography is the inspiration of the architectural settings and abstracted figures.

New York City Apartment is a piece that is cognizant of the artists individual lived experiences, significantly lamp lighting his move from South Korea to the United States, in addition to the places he has called home such as his childhood home (a traditional hanok-style Korean house), the house in Rhode Island where he once lived as a student, and his current apartment in New York City.

His work invokes transparency, gradating space and intermediate areas in Korean architecture, and has been taken various physical forms such as the recapitulations of large-scale house sculptures, identifying the ostinatos of his past and present family homes, intersected in a way that makes the interiors visible. Do’s use of monochrome polyester transparent structures are luminous, architectural, and fleeting, allowing audiences to roam through the disorienting interior passageways.

The main installation seems to represent almost any and every single bedroom apartment in New York with its one living room, bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom. Each piece of the home-like installation hanging in apparent stability, however, with the lack of foundation alerts audiences to the precarious fragility of the polyester home. Even the items featured that your mind wants you to think are hard, a toilet made of solid porcelain, a heater, a light switch embedded into a wall is truly soft and material that is hardly there- leading many viewers to question if the solid objects that these translucent representations epitomize are any less precarious than the monochrome polyester. Is home, the thing we feel is most stable, truly something forever, or something that delicately hangs in the balance and can change?

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, at MOCA Cleveland, 2015, Photo Jerry Birchfield 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 3
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 4
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 6

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 7
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 8
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 9
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 10
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin, Photo by Brian Fitzsimmons
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin, Photo Brian Fitzsimmons 4
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014, The Contemporary Austin, Photo Brian Fitzsimmons 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin, Photo Brian Fitzsimmons 3
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase (detail), Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Staircase detail, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Staircase (detail), Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015 3
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Beautiful & intricate miniature of ancient Japanese temple

Beautiful & intricate miniature of ancient Japanese temple

Takahiro Iwasaki - Reflection Model (Perfect Bliss)
Takahiro IwasakiReflection Model (Perfect Bliss), 2010-2012, 150 x 280 x 194cm, Japanese cypress, wire

Japanese artist Takahiro Iwasaki’s sculpture the Reflection Model (Perfect Bliss) is a sophisticated miniature recreation of Phoenix Hall, which is part of Japan’s Byodo-in Temple complex. Embodying many elements of tradition and modernity, as the piece imitates the reflection of the traditional mirror pond as a physical object, suspended from the ceiling, performing to the audience as a three-dimensional mirrored image hovering magically in the air.

The juxtapositions within this piece are appropriate in considering Iwasaki’s artwork’s relationship to Orientalism and Japanese modernity. This work reflects upon the ways in which architecture has been influential in the development of conceptions of Japanese national identity, along with the opposed concept of Westernization in Japanese culture. Iwasaki’s use of ‘construction’ is both corresponding and fundamental, inferring the function of architecture in forming social values and perceptions of collective identity.

The miniatures are fashioned with inverted imagery bringing the sculpture to life through the illusion of water and reflection. Iwasaki’s work involves the combination of realism and dreamlike ingenuity to create the feeling of awe as the weightlessness of the floating building can bring to mind sentiments of exposure and delicacy with a contrasting feeling of sustenance and strength.

As you stand peering at the piece eye level, or sit below the flying building looking up as it seemingly grows before your eyes, you are immersed in the cultural identify of Japan that includes reverence for the past and tradition while simultaneously embracing modernity and futurism. The beauty and the intertextual meaning is paramount. It demonstrates the ways in which national identity is not static but a progression of complex and continuing negotiations between fluctuating domestic and international circumstances.

Takahiro Iwasaki - Reflection Model (Perfect Bliss)

Takahiro Iwasaki - Reflection Model (Perfect Bliss)


Posted in Others | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment
Page 1 of 3123
Want inspiration in your inbox?
Ok
close-link
Public Delivery

Public Delivery