Archive: Belgium
Attractive & repulsive – Detailed models of cathedral-like trucks

Attractive & repulsive – Detailed models of cathedral-like trucks

Wim Delvoye - Caterpillar nr. 5, Beaufort Triennial, Middelkerke, Westende, Belgium

Wim Delvoye - Caterpillar nr. 5, Beaufort Triennial, Middelkerke, Westende, Belgium
Wim DelvoyeCaterpillar nr. 5, at Beaufort Triennial, Middelkerke, Westende, Belgium

Wim Delvoye is a neo-conceptual artist that is well known for his innovative and sometimes out-of-the-box projects. He connects the attractive and the repulsive in an effortless way, creating works that are inherent contradictions. When you see his pieces for the first time, you almost feel repulsed, then seduced, and finally held in awe of his craftsmanship and aesthetic.

His work is indiscriminate, as was the case with Cloaca and he dares to challenge the art industry and the inconsequence of contemporary art production, questioning the commoditization of contemporary work where the value of the art is more important than what it represents. At the Louvre Museum, one of his gothic works juxtaposed carpeted pigs that had been taxidermied with grand crystal chandeliers in Napoleon III’s apartment. In another piece, he placed a colossal 11-meter phallic globe that looks like a corkscrew suppository right beneath the museum’s glass pyramid.

There is no doubt that Delvoye thrives in challenging audiences to be more open minded by making them feel perturbed and on edge. His non-conformist style and showmanship sets him apart from other artists as he dares to alter people’s ideas of beauty where he continually associates the repulsive with the attractive. Even though his gothic works have stirred a lot of controversies, it is evident that he makes every effort possible to ensure that every element is as he needs it to be.

His gothic works show off his extensive artisanal skills such as embossing, steel work, weaving, tattooing and glass making. His ornate steel and stainless steel gothic cathedral trucks showcase a level of skill and craftsmanship that can only be described as ‘so Delvoye.’ The scale models of the cathedral trucks that were created using the architecture and the visual quality of the gothic era marry so well to create a contrast between gothic craftsmanship and the machine-based exterior of the vehicles.

The amount of detail featured in the models is astounding, and more importantly, it challenges the viewer’s perception of things. The more daring thinker, ought to appreciate his talent for connecting two seemingly impossibly incompatible styles to produce masterful works of art.

Wim Delvoye - D11, 2008, laser-cut Corten steel, 117x127x270cm, Installation view, Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels, Belgium, 2008
Wim DelvoyeD11, 2008, laser-cut Corten steel, 117x127x270cm, Installation view, Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels, Belgium, 2008

Wim Delvoye - Cement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium 1
Wim DelvoyeCement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium

Wim Delvoye - Cement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium 2
Wim DelvoyeCement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium

Wim Delvoye - Cement Truck, 2007, laser-cut Corten stell, 802x225x352, MONA Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania, Australia
Wim DelvoyeCement Truck, 2007, laser-cut Corten stell, 802x225x352, MONA Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania, Australia

Wim Delvoye - Concrete Mixer, Laser-cut Stainless Steel 2
Wim DelvoyeConcrete Mixer, 2007, laser-cut stainless steel

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