Archive: exhibition
Korean vases: Imperfection gives way to stunning results

Korean vases: Imperfection gives way to stunning results

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase Thousand, 2012. Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable, Korea Artist Prize, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Korea
Translated Vase Thousand, 2012. Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable, Korea Artist Prize, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Korea

Yeesookyung is a South Korean artist living in Seoul. She is known for her complex and enchanting ceramic designs and sculptures. The Translated series series, like many of her works, is made up of shards and fragments of broken ceramic pieces that are carefully pieced together like a jigsaw puzzle. Yeesookyung created her Translated Vase back in 2002 after she observed discarded trash from the ceramic master Lim Hang Taek glimmering in the sunlight. The reflection of light from the shards and the organic forms of the cracks inspired her craft.

To create the Translated Vase, Yeesookyung uses epoxy resin to glue together the different fragments of the broken pots. To make the fissures and the cracks more prominent, Yeesookyung uses 24-carat gold leaf for glazing. The gold acts as the perfect addition to complement the beautifully misshapen fractures of the re-constructed vase.

The biomorphic form of the vessel helps to capture the eye immediately as the repurposed pottery created manages to surpass the original beauty of the vase. The Translated Vase combines the delicate fragility of ceramic pottery with the fortified strength of the glue and the gold, the end result of which is something truly magnificent. Yeesookyung covers the cracks in gold because the Korean word for crack and gold is similar. The use of products that share the same name also helps to add an element of humor to the work.

Yeesookyung’s technique in pottery, as stunning as it may be is not new. For years, artists in Korea have been reconstructing and rebuilding discarded ceramic pieces that would typically be considered trash in other parts of the world. The waste is sometimes restored to create new Korean ceramics while others like Yeesookyung’s are used as art. This art form, known as Kinstukuroi also uses metals such as platinum and silver for the repairing process.

The Translated Vase represents the struggle that all individuals face in life. The cracks on the vase represent the wounds that are formed from the struggle while the gold represents the beauty and maturity that people experience when they overcome suffering. Aside from denoting the suffering, Yeesookyung’s attention to detail helped to break the ceramic tradition that insists on perfection.

Rather than discard a perfect piece, like a master potter would, Yeesookyung chose to create new forms from the useless pieces to emphasize that imperfection can also give way to stunning beauty. It is safe to say that the Translated Vase succeeded in channeling the imperfections and irregularities that exist in nature.

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable
Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable”

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase (Detail), 2009, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable
Translated Vase (Detail), 2009, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2011, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf 13 × 12 3:5 × 12 3:5 in 33 × 32 × 32 cm
Translated Vase, 2011, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 33 × 32 × 32 cm”

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 34 cm diameter
Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 34 cm diameter

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2014, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24-carat gold leaf 44 x 44 x 44 cm (17.32 x 17.32 x 17.32 in)
Translated Vase, 2014, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24-carat gold leaf 44 x 44 x 44 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 61 x 47 x 52 cm
Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 61 x 47 x 52 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 44 x 50 x 44 cm
Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 44 x 50 x 44 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 37 x 31 x 34 cm
Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 37 x 31 x 34 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2007, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 43 x 45 x 49cm
Translated Vase, 2007, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 43 x 45 x 49cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2008, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf 35 × 20 1:2 × 19 3:10 in 89 × 52 × 49 cm
Translated Vase, 2008, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 89 × 52 × 49 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic Shards, Epoxy, 24k Gold Leaf, 160 x 92 x 95 cm
Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic Shards, Epoxy, 24k Gold Leaf, 160 x 92 x 95 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 karat gold leaf 135 x 85 x 85 cm
Translated Vase, 2010, ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 karat gold leaf, 135 x 85 x 85 cm”

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 karat gold leaf 158 x 90 x 90 cm
Translated Vase, 2010, ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 karat gold leaf, 158 x 90 x 90 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2016, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf_174(h) x 128 x 120cm
Translated Vase, 2016, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 174 x 128 x 120cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2011, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24K gold leaf,, 66 x 64 x 97cm
Translated Vase, 2011, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 66 x 64 x 97cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic shards, aluminum bars, epoxy resin, 24K gold leaf, 122x84x81cm
Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic shards, aluminum bars, epoxy resin, 24K gold leaf, 122 x 84 x 81 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2014, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 220x110x100cm
Translated Vase, 2014, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 220 x 110 x 100 cm”

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2007, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 120x210x95cm. Collection of National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea.
Translated Vase, 2007, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 120 x 210 x 95cm, Collection of National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase (Installation View), 2009, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 85 x 170 x 80cm 2
Installation View of Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 85 x 170 x 80cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase (Installation View), 2009, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 85 x 170 x 80cm
Installation View of Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 85 x 170 x 80cm


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46 years in the making: Artist creates visual feel of infinity

46 years in the making: Artist creates visual feel of infinity

Doug Wheeler - PSAD Synthetic Desert III, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Photo David Heald
Doug WheelerPSAD Synthetic Desert III, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Photo: David Heald

Over 40 years ago, a leading Light and Space artist called Doug Wheeler imagined an art project that resembled the tranquility you would experience if you travelled to an expansive desert such as the one in Arizona. For a long time, the idea only existed on paper due to the amount of resources it required to get going.

Luckily, a while back, the Guggenheim Museum in New York decided to take up the project and realize the Doug’s dream.

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Properties torched in the name of art

Properties torched in the name of art


Ian Strange – Film still from Suburban

Suburban is a complex film and photography installation that was created by New York-based Australian artist Ian Strange. Suburban was created by Strange as a result of a collaboration with a film crew and volunteers from different parts of America including Alabama, Detroit, New Hampshire, Ohio and New York. Over the course of three months Strange and the film crew photographed and filmed 8 different sites that featured singular suburban homes from different states.

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Stunning 7m balloon model of the moon

Stunning 7m balloon model of the moon

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, photo from inside the Moon

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter

Bristol native and artist Luke Jerram has an unerring knack for creating arresting public art projects. One of his recent works is Museum of the Moon, a model of the moon, that was singlehandedly created by Jerram. It is so realistic in its detailing and features such that each centimeter of the spherical structure represents 5km of the moon’s surface. The spherical surface is covered with accurate pictures of the moon and the inside is lit internally to make it as similar looking to the actual moon as possible.

The moon, which is 7 meter diameters, was designed and intended to be a touring art piece. The light included within the gigantic sphere helps to make the imagery more visible. To ensure that the renderings were as realistic as possible, Jerram had to make use of official images that Nasa had taken before using bright color lights to backlight the inside of the sculpture.

Jerram came up with the idea of the piece because of the moon’s universal appeal and influence; the moon looks the same and it has the same effect regardless of where in the world it can be seen. The moon has always served the role of a cultural mirror that reflects people’s traditions, cultures, and beliefs. As such, the moon can be classified as a god that has inspired the development of numerous art forms including music, poetry, language and art. The Museum of the Moon was therefore created as an homage to the natural wonder.

Because people have different beliefs about the moon and its power, Jerram’s sculpture was designed to be showcased in different parts of the world. This way, the moon will provoke different sensations, thoughts, and feelings depending on where in the world it is being observed. The purpose was to create something that is both attractive and a piece that can also invite questions about life in general. In the end, the hope is that audiences will be moved to reconnect with the ubiquitous moon as they explore the impact of the moon on various cultures and societies.

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 4
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017
Photo: Neil James Brain

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 2
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 3
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - Lieux Publics, Cité des arts de la rue, Marseille, Photo Gregoire Edouard
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Lieux Publics, Cité des arts de la rue, Marseille, 2016
Photo: Gregoire Edouard

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - St. Thomas’ Church, Kendal, UK, 2016 2
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, St. Thomas’ Church, Kendal, UK, 2016

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, installation of the moon
Installation of Museum of the Moon

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, photo from inside the Moon
Photo of Luke Jerram inside of Museum of the Moon


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This daring painting became one of Pablo Picasso’s most famous works

This daring painting became one of Pablo Picasso’s most famous works

Pablo Picasso - Guernica, 1937, oil painting on canvas, 3.49x7.77m, Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

Pablo Picasso - Guernica, 1937, oil painting on canvas, 3.49x7.77m, Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain
Pablo PicassoGuernica, 1937, oil painting on canvas, 3.49×7.77m, Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain

Guernica is one of Pablo Picasso’s most famous works. This mural-sized oil painting on canvas was done in 1937. He used a palette of gray, white, and black colors to bring out a political statement denouncing the unnecessary sufferings brought about by Nazi bombings.

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The birth of brutalism – Rick Owen’s weird furniture

The birth of brutalism – Rick Owen’s weird furniture

Rick Owens - Black Marble 2 Prong Bench, 2012, black marble, Edition of 8, 80x300 or 380x90cm

Installation view of Rick Owens- Furniture, December 17, 2016–April 2, 2017 at MOCA Pacific Design Center, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, photo by Brian Forrest
Installation view of Rick Owens: Furniture at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 2016-2017
Photo: Brian Forrest

When asked to speak about his art, Rick Owens appreciates designers who make hand beads or ball gowns but he loves his style more. By making use of rare materials and working with highly skilled artisans, he is able to create unique items. With an emphasis on art as opposed to lifestyle, Owens creates massive monuments with little assembly work compared to the carving involved.

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World’s worst criminal regretting his sins

World’s worst criminal regretting his sins

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP

How much penance do the atrocities that Adolf Hitler committed in his lifetime require to be forgiven? This is perhaps the question which Maurizio Cattelan wanted to arouse in his audience when he drew a picture of the Nazi leader in a kneeling position. There is nothing wrong with someone kneeling down in prayer and in fact, it is an aspect of humanity that keeps us humble. With this in mind, it is hard to imagine that the person seeking forgiveness exercised untold torture on fellow human beings. If approached from behind, one cannot help but marvel at the self-discipline and commitment that this young boy eludes. It is not until one gets close enough that they realize that the neatly pressed school boy attire, fresh raven hair and well-polished shoes, actually belong to a leader whose name still raises goose bumps in the present day.

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