Archive: installation
Colorful life-sized recreation of entire apartment

Colorful life-sized recreation of entire apartment

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, at MOCA Cleveland, 2015, Photo Jerry Birchfield 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

South Korean artist Do Ho Suh created an installation based on his New York home. It serves to highlight the permeable margins that are said to disconnect private and public in addition to the normalized concepts global identity, space and place, diasporic movement, memory, and displacement. Do Ho Su’s biography is the inspiration of the architectural settings and abstracted figures.

New York City Apartment is a piece that is cognizant of the artists individual lived experiences, significantly lamp lighting his move from South Korea to the United States, in addition to the places he has called home such as his childhood home (a traditional hanok-style Korean house), the house in Rhode Island where he once lived as a student, and his current apartment in New York City.

His work invokes transparency, gradating space and intermediate areas in Korean architecture, and has been taken various physical forms such as the recapitulations of large-scale house sculptures, identifying the ostinatos of his past and present family homes, intersected in a way that makes the interiors visible. Do’s use of monochrome polyester transparent structures are luminous, architectural, and fleeting, allowing audiences to roam through the disorienting interior passageways.

The main installation seems to represent almost any and every single bedroom apartment in New York with its one living room, bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom. Each piece of the home-like installation hanging in apparent stability, however, with the lack of foundation alerts audiences to the precarious fragility of the polyester home. Even the items featured that your mind wants you to think are hard, a toilet made of solid porcelain, a heater, a light switch embedded into a wall is truly soft and material that is hardly there- leading many viewers to question if the solid objects that these translucent representations epitomize are any less precarious than the monochrome polyester. Is home, the thing we feel is most stable, truly something forever, or something that delicately hangs in the balance and can change?

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, at MOCA Cleveland, 2015, Photo Jerry Birchfield 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 3
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 4
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 6

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 7
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 8
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 9
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 10
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin, Photo by Brian Fitzsimmons
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin, Photo Brian Fitzsimmons 4
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014, The Contemporary Austin, Photo Brian Fitzsimmons 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin, Photo Brian Fitzsimmons 3
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase (detail), Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Staircase detail, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Staircase (detail), Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015 3
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015


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Free candy in a museum

Free candy in a museum

Felix Gonzalez-Torres - "Untitled" (Portrait of Ross in L.A.), 1991, The Art Institute of Chicago
Felix Gonzalez-TorresUntitled (Portrait of Ross in L.A.), 1991, Candies individually wrapped in multicolor cellophane, endless supply. Dimensions vary with installation; ideal weight 175 lbs. At The Art Institute of Chicago
(Photo mark6mauno Flickr)

Felix Gonzalez-Torres’ piece “Untitled” (Portrait of Ross in L.A.) is one of his nineteen candy pieces and featured in many museums around the world. The work targets the topic of a serious nature, one that is still unfortunately often taboo in mainstream society. It takes the topic from the shadows, where individuals still cringe and avert their eyes, and lays it on the table for discussion and contemplation.

The approximate 175 pounds of candy that make up the work resemble the 175-pound body of Ross Laycock, the artists’ boyfriend who died of AIDS in 1991. As each person takes a piece of candy, they in turn act as the AIDS virus depleting Ross’ body, piece be piece taking it away until there is nothing left. Felix Gonzalez-Torres, who dedicated his artwork to the one he love and lost, died in 1996 of AIDS.

His work doesn’t only represent the disease and its depletion on the body, but it represents the love between the person who is suffering from the disease and the person who is there to support them and suffer with them. The sweet candy, in and of itself, is a representation of love. If you think about giving candy to a loved one on valentine’s day, sweets in a box with flowers on mother’s day, candy has long been tied to affection and love. While the candy is eaten, while the body begins to disappear, the love remains.

While there has been much development and change since the 80’s and 90’s, there has been no cure and there has remained a stigma attached to the disease. Treatment allows individuals with HIV to live long and fairly normal lives, however there is still much more work needed in the area, and there is need for unstigmatized conversation.

This work of art says so much and is absolutely just as important today as it was in the 90’s. If you ever have the chance, this is a piece you must see.

Felix Gonzalez-Torres - "Untitled" (Portrait of Ross in L.A.), 1991, The Art Institute of Chicago
Felix Gonzalez-TorresUntitled (Portrait of Ross in L.A.), 1991, Candies individually wrapped in multicolor cellophane, endless supply. Dimensions vary with installation; ideal weight 175 lbs. At The Art Institute of Chicago

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Beautiful & intricate miniature of ancient Japanese temple

Beautiful & intricate miniature of ancient Japanese temple

Takahiro Iwasaki - Reflection Model (Perfect Bliss)
Takahiro IwasakiReflection Model (Perfect Bliss), 2010-2012, 150 x 280 x 194cm, Japanese cypress, wire

Japanese artist Takahiro Iwasaki’s sculpture the Reflection Model (Perfect Bliss) is a sophisticated miniature recreation of Phoenix Hall, which is part of Japan’s Byodo-in Temple complex. Embodying many elements of tradition and modernity, as the piece imitates the reflection of the traditional mirror pond as a physical object, suspended from the ceiling, performing to the audience as a three-dimensional mirrored image hovering magically in the air.

The juxtapositions within this piece are appropriate in considering Iwasaki’s artwork’s relationship to Orientalism and Japanese modernity. This work reflects upon the ways in which architecture has been influential in the development of conceptions of Japanese national identity, along with the opposed concept of Westernization in Japanese culture. Iwasaki’s use of ‘construction’ is both corresponding and fundamental, inferring the function of architecture in forming social values and perceptions of collective identity.

The miniatures are fashioned with inverted imagery bringing the sculpture to life through the illusion of water and reflection. Iwasaki’s work involves the combination of realism and dreamlike ingenuity to create the feeling of awe as the weightlessness of the floating building can bring to mind sentiments of exposure and delicacy with a contrasting feeling of sustenance and strength.

As you stand peering at the piece eye level, or sit below the flying building looking up as it seemingly grows before your eyes, you are immersed in the cultural identify of Japan that includes reverence for the past and tradition while simultaneously embracing modernity and futurism. The beauty and the intertextual meaning is paramount. It demonstrates the ways in which national identity is not static but a progression of complex and continuing negotiations between fluctuating domestic and international circumstances.

Takahiro Iwasaki - Reflection Model (Perfect Bliss)

Takahiro Iwasaki - Reflection Model (Perfect Bliss)


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1000 real trees fills world’s most famous opera house

1000 real trees fills world’s most famous opera house

Pierre Huyghe, A Forest of Lines, 2008. Concert Hall at Sydney Opera House, 16th Biennale of Sydney
Pierre HuygheA Forest of Lines, 2008. Concert Hall at Sydney Opera House, 16th Biennale of Sydney

A Forest of Lines by Pierre Huyghe is a space that brings together the sacred and the profane. The space blurs boundaries, eliminating the separation between the audience and the art where they can become the performance as they explore the constructed forest in the theatre made of a thousand real trees, inside the concert hall at the Sydney Opera House. Thus turning one of the most urban places in the world into a wilderness, converting a space in a way, which seems exceptionally impossible and altogether remarkable.

Paths meander through the trees, mist brings a sense of mystic as you wonder the magical and listen to the story that brings the enchantment to life. This is a space of representation, in which an environment has been transplanted, and becomes a liminal place that is somewhere between nature and urban, a place that lays somewhere in between fiction and fact. Forests are often the sites of fairy tales and legends; they are places of amazement and sometimes fear.

There is something profoundly sensational about the opera, it is the epitome of culture, and furthermore, the Sydney Opera House is internationally known for its architecture and aesthetics. Thus by constructing a forest in a place that represents culture, humanism, and progress, the Cartesian dualism of nature versus culture is completely overridden.

This revolutionary piece demonstrates the mediation of binaries while taking the audience into a different world of the wilderness inside. The melody is written by Laura Marling especially for Pierre Huyghes’ performance, the lyrics literally indicate how to get outside the Opera House and go somewhere else. Visitors to this installation wandered through the glorious forest, and some even set up picnics in the installation, using the space as they would a park. This space was open for 24 hours, and within that short time, audience members were given the opportunity to explore a world that can be described as only a dream.

Pierre Huyghe, A Forest of Lines, 2008. Concert Hall at Sydney Opera House, 16th Biennale of Sydney
Pierre HuygheA Forest of Lines, 2008. Concert Hall at Sydney Opera House, 16th Biennale of Sydney

Pierre Huyghe, A Forest of Lines, 2008. Concert Hall at Sydney Opera House, 16th Biennale of Sydney - 3
Pierre HuygheA Forest of Lines, 2008. Concert Hall at Sydney Opera House, 16th Biennale of Sydney

Pierre Huyghe, A Forest of Lines, 2008. Concert Hall at Sydney Opera House, 16th Biennale of Sydney - 4
Pierre HuygheA Forest of Lines, 2008. Concert Hall at Sydney Opera House, 16th Biennale of Sydney

Pierre Huyghe, A Forest of Lines, 2008. Concert Hall at Sydney Opera House, 16th Biennale of Sydney
Pierre HuygheA Forest of Lines, 2008. Concert Hall at Sydney Opera House, 16th Biennale of Sydney


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7 stained glass windows you won’t see in any cathedral

7 stained glass windows you won’t see in any cathedral

Christian Marclay - Seven Windows - Palais de Tokyo
Christian MarclaySeven Windows, Palais de Tokyo

As part of the reopening of Palais De Tokyo, Christian Marclay has designed a series of glass windows overlooking the Avenue du Président-Wilson. The Swiss and American artist, whose work explores the connections between sound and visual art, uses onomatopoeias taken from comic books as graphic expressions of noise. Seven Windows encapsulates sound through glass. The result is a beautiful, colorful series that works to tell a story through the sequential panes of glass that mimic the organization of a comic strip.

About Christian Marclay

Christian Marclay is a London and New York based visual artist and composer whose innovative work explores the juxtaposition between sound recording, photography, video and film. He was born in California in 1955 and raised in Geneva, Switzerland. His mother was American so he held a double nationality. Marclay studied at the Ecole Supérieure d’Art Visuel from 1977–1980 in Geneva, Switzerland. From 1977–1980 he studied sculpture at the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston. He also studied as a visiting scholar at Cooper Union in New York in 1978. As a performer and sound artist Christian Marclay has been experimenting, composing and performing with phonograph records and turntables since 1979 to create his unique “theater of found sound,” influenced by Marcel Duchamp. Christian Marclay offers a unique, fresh and innovative voice that has inspired an entire generation of musicians, artists and theorists.

Christian Marclay - Seven Windows - Palais de Tokyo
Christian MarclaySeven Windows, Palais de Tokyo

Christian Marclay - Seven Windows - Palais de Tokyo
Christian MarclaySeven Windows, Palais de Tokyo

Christian Marclay - Seven Windows - Palais de Tokyo
Christian MarclaySeven Windows, Palais de Tokyo

Christian Marclay - Seven Windows - Palais de Tokyo
Christian MarclaySeven Windows, Palais de Tokyo

Christian Marclay - Seven Windows - Palais de Tokyo
Christian MarclaySeven Windows, Palais de Tokyo

Christian Marclay - Seven Windows - Palais de Tokyo
Christian MarclaySeven Windows, Palais de Tokyo

Christian Marclay - Seven Windows - Palais de Tokyo
Christian MarclaySeven Windows, Palais de Tokyo

Photos: #1-7 by André Morin, #8 by Florent Miche / 11h45


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Why are hundreds of shirts flying in the air?

Why are hundreds of shirts flying in the air?

Kaarina-Kaikkonen-Hanging-Clothes-Helsinki
Kaarina Kaikkonen – Helsinki, Finland

Kaarina Kaikkonen is an artist best known for creating sculptural works using recycled materials, notably second-hand clothing seen in her memorable jacket installations. The environment is incorporated into these installations in some way, resulting in a beautiful, colorful cloth landscape. Each garment individually tells a story as an extension of its past wearer, and as a group they come together to create a history and visual retelling of their space.

About Kaarina Kaikkonen

Kaarina Kaikkonen (b. 1952) began as a painter, but has become known as a sculptor who shapes the urban landscape and makes installations emphasizing the sense of community. Kaikkonen studied at the Finnish Academy of Fine Arts School in 1978-1983. Kaikkonen’s first installation was on display in Helsinki in 1988. In Finland, one of her most famous works is the Way -installation, which she built on the steps of Helsinki Cathedral in 2000.

Kaarina Kaikkonen - Networking, 2009 - Piazza Calderini, Bologna, Italy
Kaarina KaikkonenNetworking, 2009 – Piazza Calderini, Bologna, Italy

Kaarina Kaikkone - Prato contemporanea - Crossing Borders - 1
Kaarina Kaikkonen – Prato contemporanea – Crossing Borders, 2014, Firenze, Italy

Kaarina Kaikkone - Prato contemporanea - Crossing Borders - 2
Kaarina Kaikkonen – Prato contemporanea – Crossing Borders, 2014, Firenze, Italy

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Complete castle covered with photorealistic print

Complete castle covered with photorealistic print

Bettina Pousttchi - The City, 2014
Bettina Pousttchi – The City, 2014, photo installation, facade of Wolfsburg Castle, photo by Norbert Miguletz

Bettina Pousttchi is a German-Iranian artist, living and working in Berlin. She works equally in the field of media, photography, video and sculpture, often involving architecture in urban and historical contexts. Her exhibition at the Städtische Galerie Wolfsburg is a site-specific photo installation called “The City”: an artwork covering the façade of the city’s castle. This work is a reference to the history of the 20th century planned city Wolfsburg.

Working on architecture about architecture allows for an artistic practice between architecture, sculpture, and photography. It is a different way to materialize a photographic file and to bring back the digital to the physical world.

Castle of Wolfsburg
The northern wing of the castle before the renovation (photo by Städtische Galerie Wolfsburg)

Bettina Pousttchi - The City, 2014
Bettina Pousttchi – The City, 2014, photo installation, facade of Wolfsburg Castle, photo by Norbert Miguletz

Bettina Pousttchi - The City, 2014
Bettina Pousttchi – The City, 2014, photo installation, facade of Wolfsburg Castle, photo by Norbert Miguletz

Bettina Pousttchi - The City, 2014
Bettina Pousttchi – The City, 2014, photo installation, facade of Wolfsburg Castle, photo by Norbert Miguletz

Bettina Pousttchi - The City, 2014
Bettina Pousttchi – The City, 2014, photo installation, facade of Wolfsburg Castle, photo by Norbert Miguletz


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