Archive: mural
Is this the world’s most famous illegal mural?

Is this the world’s most famous illegal mural?

Keith Haring - Crack is Wack, 1986
Keith HaringCrack is Wack, 1986, handball court at 128th Street and 2nd Avenue, New York

Keith Haring came up with his celebrated Crack Is Wack mural in 1986, at a deserted handball court located along the Harlem River Drive. The images of his double-sided mural were taken by a photographer known as Juan Rivera. Of course, since the mural was created in 1986, the spot at Harlem River Drive has since been repainted and buffed after the original mural was vandalized.

Like many other street artists of the time, Haring chose a spot that had the largest potential for visibility. The wall was the perfect spot because it had the appearance of a large billboard; like some of the ones that you would typically see on a busy highway.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Colorful artworks: Designed to be walked over

Colorful artworks: Designed to be walked over

Joan Miró - 1970, earthenware, 10x50m, Terminal B, El Prat Airport, Barcelona, Spain detail
Joan MiróWall of the Barcelona Airport (detail), 1970, earthenware, 10x50m, Terminal B, El Prat Airport, Barcelona, Spain

If you have ever been to Barcelona, you must have walked over one of Joan Miro’s mosaics. The artist began to publicly display his work in 1976 when he chose the centre of Barcelona’s Rambla to permanently incorporate his work into a pavement. This was in fulfilment of a pledge he had made in 1968 to create four pieces of art which he would donate to the city of Barcelona where he was born. The use of different colors in the mosaic brings out the vibrancy that is his style of art. All the artwork that is associated with Joan Miró speaks the language of simplicity; generous use of color and simple shapes. More than four decades after his first outdoor work of art, the works of Joan Miró located in various parts of the world are enjoying facelifts of massive proportions.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Sol LeWitt’s influential drawings on walls around the world

Sol LeWitt’s influential drawings on walls around the world

Sol LeWitt, Wall Drawing #1136
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #1136

Over the course of his prolific, influential career, Sol LeWitt (1928–2007) produced more than 1.200 wall drawings. Early in his career, Sol LeWitt began to have others help execute his wall drawings. Wall Drawing 16 was first drawn by a draftsmen, which helped LeWitt to realize his work according to his instructions and diagrams, addressing practical concerns such as the time-consuming nature of the drawings. More significantly, however, this choice articulated LeWitt’s belief that the conception of the idea, rather than its execution, constitutes the art work. He was also rejecting the traditional importance assigned to the artist’s own hand. The artist executed the earliest wall drawings within a square, usually four by four feet wide, but by 1969 he was using the entire wall, starting with Wall Drawing 16.

The drawings range from layers of straight lines meticulously drawn in black graphite pencil lead, to rows of delicately rendered wavy lines in colored pencil; from bold black-and-white geometric forms, to bright planes in acrylic paint arranged like the panels of a folding screen; from sensuous drawings created by dozens of layers of transparent washes, to a tangle of vibratory orange lines on a green wall, and much more. Forms may appear to be flat, to recede in space, or to project into the viewer’s space, while others meld to the structure of the wall itself.

LeWitt, who stressed the idea behind his work over its execution, is widely regarded as one of the leading exponents of Minimalism and Conceptual art, and is known primarily for his deceptively simple geometric structures and architecturally scaled wall drawings. His experiments with the latter commenced in 1968 and were considered radical, in part because this new form of drawing was purposely temporal and due to the collaborative element.

Sol LeWitt - Wall Drawing #122 (1972)
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #122, 1972, Black pencil grid, blue crayon arcs and lines
Image © Estate of Sol LeWitt / ARS, New York. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Sol LeWitt - Wall Drawing 238
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #238, June 1974, Black pencil and black crayon, LeWitt Collection, Chester, Connecticut

Sol LeWitt, Wall Drawing #260
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #260

Sol LeWitt - Wall Drawing 280
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #280

Sol LeWitt, Wall Drawing 340, July 1980
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #340, July 1980

Sol LeWitt - Wall Drawing 343A,B,C,D,E,F
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #343A,B,C,D,E,F, December 1980, White crayon on black wall

Sol LeWitt - Wall Drawing 343G
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #343 G

Sol LeWitt, Wall Drawing #346
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #346, india ink

Sol LeWitt Wall Drawing #354, 1981 ink, Basel Foto- Fabio Fabbrini, courtesy of Fondation Beyeler.jpg
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #354, 1981, ink, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Fabio Fabbrini, courtesy of Fondation Beyeler.jpg

Sol Lewitt - Wall Drawing #356 BB, Cube Without a Cube
Sol LeWitt – Wall Drawing #356 BB, Cube Without a Cube

Read more


Posted in Others | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments
Mural plays with quotes by Nipsey Hussle

Mural plays with quotes by Nipsey Hussle

luciano-calderon-sesc-palladium-mural-2

In March, 2013 Swiss-Bolivian artist Luciano Calderon painted a site-specific, indoor mural in Belo Horizonte, Brasil. The painting was executed for the Verão Arte Contemporânea Festival inside Sesc Palladium.

Calderon used two quotes by African American artists, the first being Tina Turner’s What’s love got to with it which is an ironic comment about the relationship of art and money. In contemporary times how much does love actually have in common with art?

Nipsey Hussle’s Don’t holla at me unless money is the topic alludes to the people working solely for money, some of those being business men using the very center where the mural is painted.

Calderon’s upcoming shows are a major show Centro Cultural de España en La Paz, one of Bolivia’s most exciting art spaces, and a group show at the State Museum for Ethnology in Munich.

Artwork details:
Untitled, 2013
Marker, spray paint, liquid paper on wood
250x1200cm

The project was curated by Angelina Camelo

luciano-calderon-dont-holla-at-me-unless-money-is-the-topic-sketch
Don’t holla at me unless money is the topic (sketch), 2013

luciano-calderon-sesc-palladium-mural-3

luciano-calderon-sesc-palladium-mural-4

luciano-calderon-sesc-palladium-mural-6

luciano-calderon-sesc-palladium-mural-5
What’s love got to do with it, 2013

luciano-calderon-sesc-palladium-dont-holla-at-me-unless-money-is-the-topic
Don’t holla at me unless money is the topic, 2013

luciano-calderon-sesc-palladium-metro
On the front page of Metro Belo Horizonte, part of Metro, the world’s largest newspaper


Posted in Luciano Calderon | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment
These large murals don’t make any sense

These large murals don’t make any sense

Karl Haendel - Scribble @441 Broadway (mural)

Karl Haendel - Scribble @441 Broadway (digital rendering)
Karl Haendel – Scribble (digital rendering), NYC

In 2009, Los Angeles based artist Karl Haendel made two large scribble murals, one was his first public installation in New York, the other, a similar painting, was executed in Los Angeles. His gigantic scribbles are an anti heroic gesture with roots in street art, public mark making and a universal means of communication.

To put one of these scribbles on the side of a building of course engages a dialogue with graffiti and street art, and this became a central concern as well as an inspiration. My scribble work, because its an anonymous mark and one that anybody could make, I hope will draw attention to the simple need to make a mark, and I hope it makes people think about gesture, pure expression, and the straightforward act of creation. These are tendencies that I think are not only fundamental to art making, but to life in general, and are imperatives that most people I hope can relate to.

Karl Haendel (b. 1976) owns and individualizes the world of popular culture by re-drawing it in his own vision, cleverly manipulating scale, composition, and juxtaposition to uncannily transform ordinary images into witty perspectives on contemporary life. He received his MFA from UCLA in 2003 and has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Harris Lieberman, New York; Anna Helwing Gallery, Los Angeles. His work has also been included in such notable exhibitions as the 2004 and 2008 California Biennials and Uncertain States of America, a touring exhibition that originated at the Astrup Fearnley Museum for Modern Art, Oslo, and traveled to Serpentine Gallery, London, and the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, among other venues.

Karl Haendel - <em>Scribble</em>, 2009, paint on brick, NYC - 2
Karl Haendel – Scribble, 2009, paint on brick, NYC

Karl Haendel - Scribble @441 Broadway (mural)
Karl Haendel – Scribble, 2009, paint on brick, NYC

Karl Haendel - Public -Scribble #2 - LAX Art facade, 2009 in Los Angeles - 1
Karl Haendel, Public Scribble #2, 2009, paint on brick, 5,5 x 19,5m, Los Angeles

Karl Haendel - Public -Scribble #2 - LAX Art facade, 2009 in Los Angeles - 2
Karl Haendel, Public Scribble #2, 2009, paint on brick, 5,5 x 19,5m, Los Angeles

Karl Haendel - Public -Scribble #2 - LAX Art facade, 2009 in Los Angeles - 3
Karl Haendel, Public Scribble #2, 2009, paint on brick, 5,5 x 19,5m, Los Angeles


Posted in Others | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
This is Asia’s tallest mural (70m+)

This is Asia’s tallest mural (70m+)

Hendrik Beikirch - wherethereisnostrugglethereisnostrength, 2012, Busan

During the last week of August 2012, German painter Hendrik Beikirch, created not only a stunning work but an iconic piece that stretches over 70 meters (230 ft.) high and is yet to be considered as Asia’s tallest mural. Located in South Korea‘s second largest city, Busan, this piece showcases a monochromatic mural of a fisherman, set in contrast with the Haeundae I’Park building at the background, constructed by renowned architect Daniel Libeskind.

The Haeundae I’Park is a residential building and is also a symbol for the rapid development and accumulated wealth in Korea, a poor country not too long ago. The mural that depicts an image of a fisherman represents a significant portion of Korea‘s population that has not been affected by the economic growth and until now, lives under very different circumstances compared to their affluent neighbors.

Responsible for this project is Public Delivery, an organization who has made waves across Asia and Europe through the promotion of contemporary art.

The artwork will be on display for an indefinite period of time.

THE PAINTING

The mural presents a local fisherman in his 60’s, staring into an intangible space with his face marked with wrinkles, still wearing long plastic gloves – a sign that there are still men and women like him at this age working for a living. This dying profession entails six to seven days of work in a week, under difficult circumstances, while just receiving a minimum amount of financial support, just enough to buy certain needs.

However, despite the story behind the portrait, the painting conveys a positive message seen in the emotion shown by the fisherman. In addition, underneath it, Beikirch added a statement in Korean letters which roughly translate to “Where there is no struggle, there is no strength.”

Beikirch is known for his artworks set in monochromatic and detailed painting and this is no difference. Unlike other artists, he painted this mural without using a projector or a sketch on the wall. This, in its true form, is a masterful performance and a task that requires enormous routine and outstanding precision.

THE LOCATION

The painting is applied on the building of Busan‘s fisher union. It is located between Korea’s two most famous beaches, Haeundae (해운대해수욕장) and Gwangalli (광안리해수욕장), clearly visible from the latter. Over the past years, both beaches turned into excessive commercial areas and became heavy motors for the city‘s tourism, attracting mostly Korean, Japanese, Chinese and Russian travelers.

The building is also home to a fish market that provides the prosperous inhabitants of Busan, like those living in the Hyundai I’Park building, with Korean style raw fish (hoe, 회), a pricey delicacy that is similar to Japanese sashimi.

THE ARTIST

Hendrik Beikirch (b. 1974) is a German painter well known for his series of large monochromatic wall paintings that often show portraits of older people, visibly marked by life. In order to create these works, Beikirch secretly takes sketches of strangers whom he encounters on his travels, noticing them for their aura and expression between hope and struggle. This inspired the title of his on-going series “Faces of Hope and Struggle” and runs seamlessly on the canvases of Beikirch, which mostly displays the same frontal view of unfamiliar people.

He deliberately distances himself off from the polished and artificial aesthetic of advertising, which has now occupied major parts in public space.

Beikirch always works with a reduced color palette, and therefore the high recognition factor ensures that viewers now can easily find walls by him all over Europe, Canada, the USA, Mexico, Chile, Australia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Thailand, Russia and other countries, all painted in the last 15 years.

PARTNERS

This project would not have been possible without the support of The Busan Cultural Foundation, The Arts Council Korea, Busan Metropolitan City, Indie Culture Network AGIT and Suyeong Local Government.

MBC, the oldest and one of the major commercial Korean broadcasting companies, is the main media partner.

Hendrik Beikirch - wherethereisnostrugglethereisnostrength, 2012, Busan

Hendrik Beikirch - wherethereisnostrugglethereisnostrength, 2012, Busan

Hendrik Beikirch - wherethereisnostrugglethereisnostrength, 2012, Busan

Hendrik Beikirch - wherethereisnostrugglethereisnostrength, 2012, Busan


Posted in Hendrik Beikirch, Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , | 16 Comments
Asia’s tallest mural in the making 2

Asia’s tallest mural in the making 2

Public Delivery feat. ECB Hendrik Beikirch - Mural in Busan (2012) - 2

Public Delivery feat. ECB Hendrik Beikirch - Mural in Busan (2012) - 1

Public Delivery feat. ECB Hendrik Beikirch - Mural in Busan (2012) - 2

Quick update of the mural. The upcoming typhoon delivers perfect working circumstances but also adds some time pressure for Hendrik Beikirch.

UPDATE: See the result here

(photos by Kim Tae Jeong / 김태정)


Posted in Hendrik Beikirch, Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments
Page 1 of 212
Public Delivery

Public Delivery