Archive: New York
Unusual graffiti: 200+ diary pages in NYC subway tunnels

Unusual graffiti: 200+ diary pages in NYC subway tunnels

Revs - Autobiography in NY subway tunnel - Page 60

Revs - Graffiti Autobiography in NY subway tunnel - Page 1
RevsPage 1 of many, Subway tunnel, New York, USA

Those who grew up or lived in New York during the late 1980s and early 1990s must have seen the famous four letters that would be seen on walls all over the place; Revs. Everywhere you looked, on trash cans, telephone booths and poles the distinct graffiti had dominated the city. Revs was at the time the most outstanding graffiti writer in the streets of New York and whether you liked it or not, his tags would be seen from the edge of the eyes, making it visible subconsciously.

At first, his graffiti bore messages of humor that told stories to anybody who cared to stand long enough to read and piece the sections together. However, starting from the year 1993, Revs would start to write his autobiography on walls of the subway tunnels. He would go down to the tunnels at night armed with a ladder, spray can, paint and paint roller. He began with first painting a swath measuring 5 by 12ft which would act as the page on which he would write. His idea of creating a public diary of his life is a great channel of self expression, especially when you want the whole world to know who you are.

Revs wanted the world to know that he was born at 3pm on April 17, 1967 at the Victory Memorial hospital. A C-section baby, this validates all others like him and encourages mothers who have gone through the same. It might not be possible for someone riding on the train to capture all this information but just one piece is enough to humanize Revs. His focus was to remain in the minds of people long after he died. Leaving traces in places that are not easily accessibly meant that his art could potentially be preserved for years, even to the point of outliving him. Revs left a mark both overground and below and to date a total of 235 pages of his autobiography have been counted.

An important element of his personality was how he managed to stay clear of the radar and this is after police in New York went on hot pursuit of graffiti artists to bring them to justice. For years, they were unsuccessful until 5 years after the task force was formed that they caught him red-handed. Of amusement to the cops was that the regular guy behind the wall art was no different from either of them.

Revs - Graffiti Autobiography in NY subway tunnel - Page 2
RevsPage 2 of many, Subway tunnel, New York, USA

Revs - Graffiti Autobiography in NY subway tunnel - Page 19
RevsPage 19 of many, Subway tunnel, New York, USA

Revs - Graffiti Autobiography in NY subway tunnel - Page 22, Becki Fuller
RevsPage 22 of many, Subway tunnel, New York, USA
(BTK) OF STILLWELL — WE WERE BOTH CHECKIN SHIT OUT MY PIECE ROLLED IN + THERE ON IR … ABOVE ME THAT … WE GO THRU THE … WRITES … THEN HE POINTS … A FEW SECONDS OF … HE NIPPED ME BUT I LET IT GO … BECOME FRIENDS—HE HAD A … WHO WROTE … I GOT TO KNOW … BKLYN WRITERS … NSA. ETC ONE DAY ME + IR … LUNCH AT THIS … ON SMITH ST — I BOCKROCKED … MEAT — HE DIDN’T ROCK … ASTOR DT CAUGHT ME + CUTTED ME IN THE BACK … + HE LET ME GO … LUCKY – REVS!
Photo: Becki Fuller

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Controversial sculpture cut into 3 pieces after heated debate

Controversial sculpture cut into 3 pieces after heated debate

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra is a leading sculptor who is known for creating minimalist artwork. While he began his career after studying fine arts at Yale University, he created the sculpture Tilted Arc in 1981 New York after celebrating his fortieth birthday. By this time he was already highly recognized and this is one of the reasons so much attention has been given to what became of the Titled Arc, an artwork that was intended to grace the Foley Federal Plaza for a long time would be relocated in 1989 after it became the subject of a heated debate.

The Tilted Arc was commissioned by the United States General Services Administration (GSA) and from Serra’s own assessment, he had purposed for it to be placed at the Foley Federal Plaza in front of the Jacob K. Javits Federal Building in Lower Manhattan.

Built to stand at 3.7m high and spanning 38m long, the unique feature of the tilted arc was its lean to one side. It would have been a permanent addition to this busy part of the city had the administration taken time to prepare the people before its arrival. To the office workers, the artwork appeared to them as ugly and oppressive, an obstacle which had the potential to catch graffiti. Outright protests began to have it pulled down or transferred when two petitions gathered a total of 1,300 signatures. Since the GSA had commissioned the work and thought it was good at the particular area, they stood by their decision arguing that 1,300 signatures against a local population of 10,000 was not enough to influence their decision.

This strong position would be later overturned when a new mayor was installed in 1984; over a hearing that lasted 3 days and with the new mayor as the leader of the adjudicating panel. Richard Serra also spoke at the hearing, maintaining his position that the arc was built purposefully for that location and moving it from there would destroy it. 122 speakers were in favor of the arc while slightly over 50 were against it. Even when Serra sued the court, it was passed that the arc would be destroyed on order and the remains taken by Serra if he wished.

The artwork was removed in 1989, the Tilted Arc was dislodged from the ground and cut into 3 pieces. Today, the spot on which the arc stood has been replaced by landscape architectural components to liven up the place.

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York, Photo Frank Martin/BIPs/Getty Images
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York
Photo: Frank Martin/BIPs/Getty Images

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York
Photo: Elizabeth Sasser

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York
Photo: Elizabeth Sasser

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Bridging cultures with influential sculptures & furniture

Bridging cultures with influential sculptures & furniture

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 1

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 1
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

A walk through Japan reveals the close correlation between nature and aesthetics. Amid the natural setup are works of art that remind everyone about the history, beliefs and affiliations of the Japanese people. The modern art concept of creating spectacular pieces to create an art park is becoming rather common owing to the pioneer work of artists like Isamu Noguchi. Having been an artist for 60 years, he has helped shape the aesthetic and cultural appearance of Japan and the US through the creation of sculpture parks. Even in death, Noguchi is still recognized for his artwork on furniture, gardens, ceramics and architecture. Although considered subtle and bold during his time, his work is now the standard for modern and expressionist art.

Owing to his mixed heritage, Isamu Noguchi was an internationalist and it is during his travels that he picked up the inspiration to express himself in sculptures. His inspiration for large scale sculpture works with a story actually came from Mexico. He would then incorporate Japanese tranquil garden and earthy ceramic setup as well as the Chinese light ink brushing technique into his work. As one would imagine, what he created from bringing together these different aspects was epic creativity. Once he had settled in his trade, he would maintain studios in New York and Japan, perhaps to declare allegiance to his roots. The works of Isamu Noguchi are evidently aimed at enhancing harmony in human coexistence. The blend of Western and Eastern cultures, modern and traditional life, organic and geometric alignment of nature are some of the efforts Isamu Noguchi made to create tranquility in his work.

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 2
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 3
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

Isamu Noguchi - Octetra, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, USA
Isamu NoguchiOctetra, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, USA

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Glossy, ghost-like sculptures by Yoshitomo Nara

Glossy, ghost-like sculptures by Yoshitomo Nara

Yoshitomo Nara, White Ghost

Yoshitomo Nara, 2010, White Ghost

About Yoshitomo Nara’s sculptures
Yoshitomo Nara’s large fiberglass sculptures are usually glossy white and resemble komainu, mythical lion-like animal statues commonly placed at the entrance to shrines in Japan as guardians. The artist who often uses dogs and children as subjects in his work sometimes combines both, like in his work White Ghost.

About Yoshitomo Nara

Since the Japanese pop movement in the 1990s, Yoshitomo Nara has received international acclaim with his distinct figurative style. His drawings, paintings and sculptures can be seen in the permanent collections at MOMA, New York, CAC Malaga, Spain, Queensland Art Gallery, Australia and his largest sculpture, a 27’ high concrete dog is permanently installed at the Aomori Art Museum, Japan. His mixture of vulnerability, rebellion and hopefulness within his artworks connects intimately with people worldwide. Nara also shares a deep connection with his fans and is always finding creative ways to interact with the public.

Yoshitomo Nara, Aemori Ken
Yoshitomo Nara, Aomori-ken (Aomori dog)

Yoshitomo Nara, Aemori Ken
Yoshitomo Nara, 2002, 72 x 51 x 108 in. (182.88 x 129.54 x 274.32 cm)

Read more


Posted in Others | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
These large murals don’t make any sense

These large murals don’t make any sense

Karl Haendel - Scribble @441 Broadway (mural)

Karl Haendel - Scribble @441 Broadway (digital rendering)
Karl Haendel – Scribble (digital rendering), NYC

In 2009, Los Angeles based artist Karl Haendel made two large scribble murals, one was his first public installation in New York, the other, a similar painting, was executed in Los Angeles. His gigantic scribbles are an anti heroic gesture with roots in street art, public mark making and a universal means of communication.

To put one of these scribbles on the side of a building of course engages a dialogue with graffiti and street art, and this became a central concern as well as an inspiration. My scribble work, because its an anonymous mark and one that anybody could make, I hope will draw attention to the simple need to make a mark, and I hope it makes people think about gesture, pure expression, and the straightforward act of creation. These are tendencies that I think are not only fundamental to art making, but to life in general, and are imperatives that most people I hope can relate to.

Karl Haendel (b. 1976) owns and individualizes the world of popular culture by re-drawing it in his own vision, cleverly manipulating scale, composition, and juxtaposition to uncannily transform ordinary images into witty perspectives on contemporary life. He received his MFA from UCLA in 2003 and has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Harris Lieberman, New York; Anna Helwing Gallery, Los Angeles. His work has also been included in such notable exhibitions as the 2004 and 2008 California Biennials and Uncertain States of America, a touring exhibition that originated at the Astrup Fearnley Museum for Modern Art, Oslo, and traveled to Serpentine Gallery, London, and the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, among other venues.

Karl Haendel - <em>Scribble</em>, 2009, paint on brick, NYC - 2
Karl Haendel – Scribble, 2009, paint on brick, NYC

Karl Haendel - Scribble @441 Broadway (mural)
Karl Haendel – Scribble, 2009, paint on brick, NYC

Karl Haendel - Public -Scribble #2 - LAX Art facade, 2009 in Los Angeles - 1
Karl Haendel, Public Scribble #2, 2009, paint on brick, 5,5 x 19,5m, Los Angeles

Karl Haendel - Public -Scribble #2 - LAX Art facade, 2009 in Los Angeles - 2
Karl Haendel, Public Scribble #2, 2009, paint on brick, 5,5 x 19,5m, Los Angeles

Karl Haendel - Public -Scribble #2 - LAX Art facade, 2009 in Los Angeles - 3
Karl Haendel, Public Scribble #2, 2009, paint on brick, 5,5 x 19,5m, Los Angeles


Posted in Others | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Rotating air plane in Central Park, NYC

Rotating air plane in Central Park, NYC

Video

Photos

Paola Pivi - How I Roll (rotating piper seneca)

Paola Pivi - How I Roll (rotating piper seneca)
How I Roll, 2012; Rotating Piper Seneca, steel supports, motor

For two months a small air plane was rotating 24 hours a day in summer 2012 in Central Park, NYC. Previous works by Paola Pivi have also featured large machines, including an overturned tractor-trailer and a helicopter placed upside down.

Born in Milan, Italy, in 1971 and now based in Anchorage, Alaska, Paola Pivi’s diverse artistic practice embraces sculpture, photography, video, and performance. How I Roll is Pivi’s first public commission in the United States.

(Photos by Attilio Maranzano, via)


Posted in Others | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment
“Imagine Peace” on 15 giant billboards at Times Square, New York

“Imagine Peace” on 15 giant billboards at Times Square, New York

Yoko Ono - Imagine Peace at Times Square, New York - 1

Yoko Ono - Imagine Peace at Times Square, New York - 1

Until December 30, 15 giant electronic billboards at Times Square, New York, are transformed into Imagine Peace, a public art project by Yoko Ono. Her message of anti-violence will be translated into 24 world languages set over the tranquil imagery of a blue-sky background. The piece has been transformed into a site-specific multi-channel work, and spreads the message of peace across the monumental screens simultaneously, displayed hourly across American Eagle Times Square, MTV 44 ½ and Viacom North and South signs throughout one of the world’s most famous places, which is also known as the Crossroads of the World.

Imagine Peace uses internet projects and presence, posters, badges, and a multitude of other media to communicate its message of peace to the global community. Located in a highly trafficked location, the installation tries to spread awareness and encourage the community to take responsibility and promote worldwide peace.

Past Imagine Peace projects include Imagine Peace for Pause at The Cosmopolitan Las Vegas and the Imagine Peace Tower in Reykjavik, Iceland (2007) for which the artist has collected over 1 million wishes over the past few years.

Yoko Ono (b. 1933, Tokyo) lives and works in New York. Ono is an influential artist who pushes the boundaries of the art, film, music and theatre media. She received the prestigious Golden Lion Award for Lifetime Achievement at the 2009 Venice Biennale.

Times Square Arts is a public art program which presents leading contemporary art and performances in multiple forms and media to more than 400,000 daily visitors to New York City’s Times Square, making it one of the highest profile public arts programs in the United States. Since its inception, the program has featured works by a diverse group of more than four dozen prominent and emerging artists.

Read more


Posted in Others | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment
Page 1 of 212
Public Delivery

Public Delivery