Archive: Olafur Eliasson
Surprising freestanding waterfall at famous French landmark

Surprising freestanding waterfall at famous French landmark

Olafur Eliasson - Waterfall, 2016, Chateau de Versailles, Versailles, France, Photo Anders Sune Berg

Olafur Eliasson - Waterfall, 2016, Chateau de Versailles, Versailles, France, Photo Anders Sune Berg
Olafur EliassonWaterfall, 2016, crane, water, stainless steel, pump system, hose, ballast, Chateau de Versailles, Versailles, France
Photo: Anders Sune Berg

In his 2016 work on the Versailles waterfall, Olafur Eliasson made displacements and destabilization which have changed the perceptions people had about the famous landmark. Before he began his work, he approached the Chateau and gardens of Versailles to experiment whether the project was implementable. His work didn’t involve installation of objects, but rather coming up with an apparatus which kept visitors engaged. The erection of the ‘waterfall’ in the Grand Canal where a surge of water rushes down a crane standing tall in the air turned into a major tourist attraction. This installation was inspired by Louis XIV’s landscape architect André Le Nôtre who had a vision of creating a waterfall in the palace gardens, but he passed on before he did it.

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Ambitious installation recreated sun inside of museum

Ambitious installation recreated sun inside of museum

Olafur Eliasson - The Weather Project, 2003, Tate Modern, London
Olafur EliassonThe Weather Project, 2003, Monofrequency lights, projection foil, haze machines, mirror foil, aluminium, and scaffolding, 26.7×22.3×155.4m, Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, London
Photo: Olafur Eliasson / Tate, London

Olafur Eliasson has created a gigantic installation which in 2003 took over all space in Tate Modern, London. The artwork, a sun rising out of a mist was bound to keep any visitor in awe. In this project named The Weather Project, the Scandinavian artist recreated the sun and the sky to occupy the Turbine Hall. The whole space was covered with a fine mist that seeps into the whole space like it was coming from the outside space. Looking ahead to see if the mist escapes into the outer space, visitors saw in place of the ceiling, a replica of the space below – like a mirror. There were 200 low-sodium mono-frequency lamps at the extreme end of the hall as well. Mono-frequency lamps are mostly used in street lights and the frequency at which they emit light is so low that any other colour besides black and yellow are invisible. These lamps therefore change the view and landscape of the environment into one with two tones.

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