Archive: Paris
Hyperrealistic sculpture tells the story of love

Hyperrealistic sculpture tells the story of love

Ron Mueck - Couple Under An Umbrella, 2013 1c
Couple Under An Umbrella, 2013, mixed media, 300 x 400 x 500 cm (approx.)

At first glance, especially from a picture, it is easy to assume that the Couple under an Umbrella sculpture is a real life image frozen in time. In a world marred by conflict and competition, everybody appreciates the display of affection by people. The couple in question is quite elderly and the artist must have chosen to use this age because of its ability to influence multiple generations. The sculpture tells the story of love at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain in Paris, France where it rests on a pavilion designed by Jean Nouvel.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Striking installation comments on climate change

Striking installation comments on climate change

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

As you walk through Paris and especially in the Montsouris Park, one cannot help but notice the blue busts that appear to be rising from under the surface of the water. This art work is known as ‘Where the Tides Ebb and Flow’ created by Pedro Marzorati, an Argentinian artist. This is a commentary on how the water levels in the earth’s sea bodies continue to rise as a result of climate change. The level of submersion of the various sculptures is an indication of the level of impact that global warming is having in different parts of the world. The sequence in which the sculptures are arranged indicates that as time goes by, the human forms will be completely below the water. The use of blue for the sculptures is deliberate and so is the number of sculptures used. The work shows that poetic activism can be just as effective if not more powerful than verbal advocacy.

The world today faces many challenges one of which is climate change as a result of human activity. Is there something that can be done to protect the environment from self-destruction? The future of the continent depends on the actions of its inhabitants but a visual that can be seen all the time communicates this message better. For Pedro, a controversial installation is the only way in which this message of climate disturbances can be addressed.

Pedro Marzorati in many instances uses ordinary objects to interpret various world events. In a way, his works appeal to the subconscious and subsequently leave the audience in deep thought about problems facing humanity. By creating concern for the universe, the artist sends out warnings about what would happen if destructive activities are not stopped. To use a statue to demonstrate human destruction is the closest form of personal intervention and many artists are taking up this technique. It might not be possible to project accurately the stages of destruction that adverse global warming is going to have but the statues will continue to give a warning even to future generations.

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris
Photo: Reuters/Christian Hartmann

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris
Photo: AP/Francois Mori

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

Video

https://vimeo.com/144653000


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment
Pumpkins & Tulips – Yayoi Kusama’s most outstanding public sculptures

Pumpkins & Tulips – Yayoi Kusama’s most outstanding public sculptures

Yayoi Kusama - Pumpkin, 1994, Benesse Art Site, Naoshima, Japan
Yayoi KusamaPumpkin, 1994, Benesse Art Site, Naoshima, Japan

Celebrating her 90th birthday in 2019, Yayoi Kusama is a leading Japanese artist and legend as far as art is concerned. While she deliberately makes unique pieces that can withstand the wear and tear of the outdoors, she is renowned for reproducing her art in monumental scale when need be. Her career spans over 6 decades and during this time her works have managed to enter the collection of museums such as the New York MoMA, LACMA, Tate Modern and others.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Colorful artworks: Designed to be walked over

Colorful artworks: Designed to be walked over

Joan Miró - 1970, earthenware, 10x50m, Terminal B, El Prat Airport, Barcelona, Spain detail
Joan MiróWall of the Barcelona Airport (detail), 1970, earthenware, 10x50m, Terminal B, El Prat Airport, Barcelona, Spain

If you have ever been to Barcelona, you must have walked over one of Joan Miro’s mosaics. The artist began to publicly display his work in 1976 when he chose the centre of Barcelona’s Rambla to permanently incorporate his work into a pavement. This was in fulfilment of a pledge he had made in 1968 to create four pieces of art which he would donate to the city of Barcelona where he was born. The use of different colors in the mosaic brings out the vibrancy that is his style of art. All the artwork that is associated with Joan Miró speaks the language of simplicity; generous use of color and simple shapes. More than four decades after his first outdoor work of art, the works of Joan Miró located in various parts of the world are enjoying facelifts of massive proportions.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
World’s worst criminal regretting his sins

World’s worst criminal regretting his sins

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP

How much penance do the atrocities that Adolf Hitler committed in his lifetime require to be forgiven? This is perhaps the question which Maurizio Cattelan wanted to arouse in his audience when he drew a picture of the Nazi leader in a kneeling position. There is nothing wrong with someone kneeling down in prayer and in fact, it is an aspect of humanity that keeps us humble. With this in mind, it is hard to imagine that the person seeking forgiveness exercised untold torture on fellow human beings. If approached from behind, one cannot help but marvel at the self-discipline and commitment that this young boy eludes. It is not until one gets close enough that they realize that the neatly pressed school boy attire, fresh raven hair and well-polished shoes, actually belong to a leader whose name still raises goose bumps in the present day.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Throwback: New visual language in the field of photography

Throwback: New visual language in the field of photography

Thomas Struth - Pantheon, Rome, 1990

Thomas Struth - Pantheon, Rome, 1990
Thomas StruthPantheon, Rome, 1990

Thomas Struth is one of the most critically acclaimed contemporary photographers of our time. He is renowned for his black and white photographs of cities such as Düsseldorf and New York, as well as his family portraits. The artist who lives in Dusseldorf acquired his inspiration for his series of Museum Photographs while he was residing in Naples and Rome, where he discovered that there was a connection between paintings of art and religion and how these paintings connect audiences to their spirituality. The Museum Photographs, which was showcased at the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, marshaled in a new visual language in the field of photography.

In his series, Struth photographed the art and the visitors viewing it, as well as the viewer observing other audiences. As such, with the many layers of observation, Struth’s intention was to assess the museum’s control of their audience and the criteria that each museum has for exhibiting pieces in the way that it does. The purpose behind the Museum Photographs was to remind people that the iconic subjects of his photographs were once just unfamiliar paintings done by ordinary individuals.

For instance, his Galleria dell’Accademia I, Venice piece shows regular tourists in shorts and casual clothing as they wander around an exhibition hall that is dominated by Paolo Veronese’s 1573 painting The Feast in the House of Levi. Struth’s color print is as large as Veronese’s painting, yet the scene in his photograph is reminiscent of memories of an outing on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon. He specifically selected Veronese’s interpretation of the Feast in the House of Levi as a subject because it had a feel of a regular dinner or lunch and it depicted a rather large party atmosphere where people have gathered to drink and make merry. As a result, his photograph of the feast allows today’s audiences to look upon the masterpiece with a new energy and perspective, just like the first time it was put on public display.

For the project, Struth utilized a European 13×18 camera, and he positioned himself strategically so that every photograph he took, whether inside a museum or in the crowded streets of Paris and Vienna, rendered onlookers in random areas, which gives his pictures more power.

In the end, he managed to create a dialogue between photography and paintings, where his choice of paintings echoes his earlier black and white work in Düsseldorf. He effectively manages to bridge the gap between space and time, where the figures in the painting and the figures observing the paintings are connected despite how much time has passed since the paintings were first made public or the space that exists between them.

Thomas Struth - Pergamon Museum I, Berlin, 2001
Thomas StruthPergamon Museum I, Berlin, 2001

Thomas Struth - Pergamon Museum II, Berlin, 2001
Thomas StruthPergamon Museum II, Berlin, 2001

Thomas Struth - Pergamon Museum III, Berlin, 2001
Thomas StruthPergamon Museum III, Berlin, 2001

Thomas Struth - Pergamon Museum VI, Berlin, 1996
Thomas StruthPergamon Museum VI, Berlin, 2001

Thomas Struth - Stanze di Raffaello 2, Rome, 1990
Thomas StruthStanze di Raffaello 2, Rome, 1990

Thomas Struth - Art Institute of Chicago I, Chicago, 1990
Thomas StruthArt Institute of Chicago I, Chicago, 1990

Thomas Struth - Art Institute of Chicago II, Chicago, 1990
Thomas StruthArt Institute of Chicago II, Chicago, 1990

Thomas Struth - Galleria dell'Accademia I, Venice, 1992
Thomas StruthGalleria dell'Accademia I, Venice, 1992

Thomas Struth - Kunsthistorisches Museum III Wien, 1989
Thomas StruthKunsthistorisches Museum III Wien, 1989

Thomas Struth - Louvre 1, Paris, 1989
Thomas StruthLouvre 1, Paris, 1989

Thomas Struth - Louvre 4, Paris, 1989
Thomas StruthLouvre 4, Paris, 1989

Thomas Struth - Pergamon Museum IV, Berlin, 2001
Thomas StruthPergamon Museum IV, Berlin, 2001

Thomas Struth - National Gallery 1, London, 1989
Thomas StruthNational Gallery I, London, 1989

Thomas Struth - National Gallery II, London, 2001
Thomas StruthNational Gallery II, London, 2001

Thomas Struth - Alte Pinakothek, Self Portrait, Munich, 2000
Thomas StruthAlte Pinakothek, Self Portrait, Munich, 2000


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Artist got enormous meteorite on eBay for this installation

Artist got enormous meteorite on eBay for this installation

Chris Burden - Porsche with Meteorite, 2013, Photo by Benoit Pailley/New Museum
Chris BurdenPorsche with Meteorite, 2013, restored 1974 Porsche 914, 390 pound meteorite, steel structure installation, New Museum, New York City, USA, 2013
Photo: Benoit Pailley, New Museum

Chris Burden was not exactly an everyday artist. While his previous work usually involved a form of danger (see Shoot), his last works have still been about performance, but mostly involved creating very much advanced models of working machines. One of such of his works was sitting in the New Museum, NYC in 2013. At the New Museum, there was a large chunk of meteorite which weighed 365 pounds hanging from one end of a massive steel frame while a Canary yellow 1974 Porsche 914 hung from the other end.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Page 1 of 212
Want inspiration in your inbox?
Ok
close-link
Public Delivery

Public Delivery