Archive: public art
Stunning 7m balloon model of the moon

Stunning 7m balloon model of the moon

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, photo from inside the Moon

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter

Bristol native and artist Luke Jerram has an unerring knack for creating arresting public art projects. One of his recent works is Museum of the Moon, a model of the moon, that was singlehandedly created by Jerram. It is so realistic in its detailing and features such that each centimeter of the spherical structure represents 5km of the moon’s surface. The spherical surface is covered with accurate pictures of the moon and the inside is lit internally to make it as similar looking to the actual moon as possible.

The moon, which is 7 meter diameters, was designed and intended to be a touring art piece. The light included within the gigantic sphere helps to make the imagery more visible. To ensure that the renderings were as realistic as possible, Jerram had to make use of official images that Nasa had taken before using bright color lights to backlight the inside of the sculpture.

Jerram came up with the idea of the piece because of the moon’s universal appeal and influence; the moon looks the same and it has the same effect regardless of where in the world it can be seen. The moon has always served the role of a cultural mirror that reflects people’s traditions, cultures, and beliefs. As such, the moon can be classified as a god that has inspired the development of numerous art forms including music, poetry, language and art. The Museum of the Moon was therefore created as an homage to the natural wonder.

Because people have different beliefs about the moon and its power, Jerram’s sculpture was designed to be showcased in different parts of the world. This way, the moon will provoke different sensations, thoughts, and feelings depending on where in the world it is being observed. The purpose was to create something that is both attractive and a piece that can also invite questions about life in general. In the end, the hope is that audiences will be moved to reconnect with the ubiquitous moon as they explore the impact of the moon on various cultures and societies.

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 4
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 2
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 3
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - Lieux Publics, Cité des arts de la rue, Marseille, Photo Gregoire Edouard
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Lieux Publics, Cité des arts de la rue, Marseille, 2016
Photo: Gregoire Edouard

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - St. Thomas’ Church, Kendal, UK, 2016 2
Luke JerramMuseum of the Moon, balloon, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, St. Thomas’ Church, Kendal, UK, 2016

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, installation of the moon
Installation of Museum of the Moon

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, photo from inside the Moon
Photo of Luke Jerram inside of Museum of the Moon


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Scale of Anish Kapoor’s sculpture is frighteningly extraordinary

Scale of Anish Kapoor’s sculpture is frighteningly extraordinary

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand
Photo: Paul Kramer

North of Auckland, in a stretch of land called Gibbs Farms, sits Anish Kapoor’s Dismemberment, Site 1 (2009). The scale of this sculpture is frighteningly extraordinary and is the largest one that Kapoor has ever created; it is the height of an 8 story building.

Unsurprisingly, the sculpture makes little effort to blend in with the expansive landscape; however, it does a great job of complementing it. The sculpture imposes itself on you, and it draws you in, dominating the area in which it sits, so much so that the sculpture appears to have always been there. This speaks to the work that went into the sculpture’s construction and design.

Kapoor had to create a free standing sculpture that would last for long, which is why the monumental sculpture was created using Serge Ferrari textile that is set up to survive harsh winds and severe weather conditions. The sculpture elicits various visual sensations and interpretations from the scores of people that arrive daily at Gibbs’s farm. At first sight, the Dismemberment sculpture looks like a swollen ear whose primary purpose is to capture the sounds and the spirit of the landscape. However, with every winding turn that you take, the sculpture transforms into a large external trumpet that appears to be signaling and calling travelers from distance lands.

In a way, it bears a resemblance to the trumpet that Joshua used to spy on the town of Jericho in the Bible. Like with every art installation, the audience reserves the right to interpret a masterpiece depending on the feelings that the piece evokes. Some people have interpreted the sculpture and found it to represent a large sized vulva, while others think that it represents the head and nucleus of a large bright flower.

Kapoor created the sculpture as a way of connecting the body to the sky. The tubular red structure symbolizes colostomy bags, and the red color represents the insides of the human body. The red is internal, but it externalizes itself in various ways. The sculpture also suggests that it may be a motherly creature that is brought forth by the earth and the tube represents flesh, skin, or a dismembered artery that is bleeding on the ground possibly feeding and rejuvenating the soil it rests on. From within, the sculpture is intimate and private, however, from inside it, the landscape emerges paving the way to new life in a fragile earth.


Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand


Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand


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Colossal bright neon pink sculpture: Impossible to ignore

Colossal bright neon pink sculpture: Impossible to ignore

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan showed his large-scale flowing sculpture in 2014. The sculpture was part of the Prospect.3: Notes for Now biennial show that occurred between October 2014 and January 2015 in New Orleans.

Strachan’s project was a declarative statement and performance that was entitled You Belong Here. The installation featured a 100-foot neon art piece that would be transported from one location to another on a 140- foot barge on the Mississippi River. The barge that carried the neon piece was made visible from different regions and places throughout New Orleans. It was created to pass on a message to the residents of the city, encouraging the city dwellers to examine themselves and what the city of New Orleans means to them and their futures.

Tavares Strachan’s 20-foot-tall letters displayed in bright neon pink were impossible to ignore. Strachan used a bright, curly script and an onboard generator to communicate the words. The New Orleans project took more than 2 years to design and complete.

While the majority of the artists participating in Prospect 3 displayed their projects inside public spaces, Strachan’s work floated on a river, which means that it was experienced and observed by a significant number of people living and working in the city. The installation also existed as an app that could be accessed through smartphones and other mobile devices. The app not only allowed the public to experience the piece, but it also welcomed commentary and opinions from the locals.

While the installation was not specifically designed to render the warmth and the survivalist nature of New Orleans, many individuals that saw it chose to interpret the words ‘you belong here’ at face value. They took it as a call to welcome any new visitors to the city and as a warm appreciation for the people that had already lived there for years. In many ways, however, the phrase was intended to echo not just the welcoming sentiments of the city but to make people uncomfortable; to ask people to define who they really are in the context of New Orleans.

Unlike other projects and installations that are typically displayed in galleries and open spaces, this piece was showcased on a broad and undulating space- the Mississippi River.´ Since the barge would move from location to location, the ‘here’ portion of the phrase was constantly changing, which made the phrase ‘you belong here’ more ambiguous. The installation was dismantled at some point in January much to the dismay of the locals that wanted it to be on permanent display.

Video

https://vimeo.com/112997308
Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Preparation of Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Preparation of Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3


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Why are these golden balloons all over Taipei?

Why are these golden balloons all over Taipei?

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Eslite Spectrum Songyan - Snobs
Silence Was GoldenSnobs, Eslite Spectrum Songyan

In 2015, Public Delivery collaborated with the Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art, Taiwan’s first museum to be dedicated exclusively to contemporary art and one of the most prominent art institutions of Asia. Silence Was Golden is our on-going global public art project which is centered around words or short phrases made out of golden letter shaped balloons, chosen by performers to express their feelings towards their environment and the histories surrounding it. Words were collected through an open call, and then performed together with a variety of people, including students from Tainan National University of the Arts, National Taiwan Normal University, Tamkang University and Taipei Jingmei Girls High School in different locations all over Taipei.

Up until now, the project was performed 253 times in 1/4 of the world’s countries (179 cities, 48 countries, six continents).

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Huashan Creative Park - Anxious
Silence Was GoldenAnxious, Huashan Creative Park

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall - Boss
Silence Was GoldenBoss, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Bitan Suspension Bridge - Date
Silence Was GoldenDate, Bitan Suspension Bridge

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Xindian ghost house - Fear
Silence Was GoldenFear, Xindian ghost house

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - 228 Peace Memorial Park - Hustle
Silence Was GoldenHustle, 228 Peace Memorial Park

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Museum of Contemporary Art - Noisy
Silence Was GoldenNoisy, Museum of Contemporary Art

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Elephant Mountain - Nose
Silence Was GoldenNose, Elephant Mountain

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Guang Hua Night Market - Savour
Silence Was GoldenSavour, Guang Hua Night Market

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Xindian, Bitan tea house - Tea
Silence Was GoldenTea, Bitan tea house

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall - Temple
Silence Was GoldenTemple, Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall

Map of balloon performances in Taipei, Taiwan
Map of balloon performances


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Controversial sculpture cut into 3 pieces after heated debate

Controversial sculpture cut into 3 pieces after heated debate

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra is a leading sculptor who is known for creating minimalist artwork. While he began his career after studying fine arts at Yale University, he created the sculpture Tilted Arc in 1981 New York after celebrating his fortieth birthday. By this time he was already highly recognized and this is one of the reasons so much attention has been given to what became of the Titled Arc, an artwork that was intended to grace the Foley Federal Plaza for a long time would be relocated in 1989 after it became the subject of a heated debate.

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Colorful artworks: Designed to be walked over

Colorful artworks: Designed to be walked over

Joan Miró - 1970, earthenware, 10x50m, Terminal B, El Prat Airport, Barcelona, Spain detail
Joan MiróWall of the Barcelona Airport (detail), 1970, earthenware, 10x50m, Terminal B, El Prat Airport, Barcelona, Spain

If you have ever been to Barcelona, you must have walked over one of Joan Miro’s mosaics. The artist began to publicly display his work in 1976 when he chose the centre of Barcelona’s Rambla to permanently incorporate his work into a pavement. This was in fulfilment of a pledge he had made in 1968 to create four pieces of art which he would donate to the city of Barcelona where he was born. The use of different colors in the mosaic brings out the vibrancy that is his style of art. All the artwork that is associated with Joan Miró speaks the language of simplicity; generous use of color and simple shapes. More than four decades after his first outdoor work of art, the works of Joan Miró located in various parts of the world are enjoying facelifts of massive proportions.

For those who grew up in Wichita or attended the Wichita State University campus, the past is reclaiming its space. The mosaic which was made in France was shipped to the United States in 1978. When the restoration was handed over to a conservation service, their focus was to not only restore the original glamor but also retain the integrity of the artwork. Since the piece was an outdoor structure, it disintegrated due to high winds, lightning, thunder, and fluctuating temperatures.

Another notable Miró mosaic is located at the Barcelona Airport, Terminal 2. It is easy to spot because it is inevitably the first thing travellers step on when they get off from a flight. This is a great orientation to visitors coming to the city for the first time and rightfully so because the large mural made up of ceramic pieces is at the entry point to the city. The airport mural which measures 9 metres in length and 5 metres in width was completed in 1970. A ceramicist friend of Joan known as Josep Llorens Artigas, who he had collaborated with on various projects in the 1960s helped him to put the mural together. Joan would spend a lot of his time to create the robust mosaic but some unexpected details occurred at the kiln which fascinated the two friends. It is such details that take a lot of time to preserve that have made facelifts of the various art pieces rather time consuming. The airport mural for instance took a record 9 years to restore but the outcome is worth every second spend.

The third of the four donations dedicated to the city of Barcelona is the Pla de l’Os Mosaic which is a symbol that ushers in visitors coming into Barcelona through the sea. The mosaic, in line with the style of the artist comprises of circular forms to represent the cosmos and depicts entry into the city through the sea. Similar to his other works which have lots of colors and shapes, this mosaic situated at the seaport is made up of round shapes in bright colors. The mosaic was commissioned and installed in 1976.

The Woman and Bird statue is the last work of art done by Miró in the series which he had purposed to act as a welcome to travellers arriving into Barcelona. This particular artwork is to be found in the main train station in Barcelona and was unveiled in 1983.

Apart from the Woman and Bird statue, all the other works of the artist were designed to be walked over in public places. This did not at all bother the artist, in fact, the reality that it would undergo faster wear and tear and thus be restored regularly, could have been inspiring to him.

Joan Miró - 1970, earthenware, 10x50m, Terminal B, El Prat Airport, Barcelona, Spain
Joan MiróWall of the Barcelona Airport, 1970, earthenware, 10x50m, Terminal B, El Prat Airport, Barcelona, Spain

Joan Miró - 1970, earthenware, 10x50m, Terminal B, El Prat Airport, Barcelona, Spain
Joan MiróWall of the Barcelona Airport, 1970, earthenware, 10x50m, Terminal B, El Prat Airport, Barcelona, Spain

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Bridging cultures with influential sculptures & furniture

Bridging cultures with influential sculptures & furniture

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 1

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 1
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

A walk through Japan reveals the close correlation between nature and aesthetics. Amid the natural setup are works of art that remind everyone about the history, beliefs and affiliations of the Japanese people. The modern art concept of creating spectacular pieces to create an art park is becoming rather common owing to the pioneer work of artists like Isamu Noguchi. Having been an artist for 60 years, he has helped shape the aesthetic and cultural appearance of Japan and the US through the creation of sculpture parks. Even in death, Noguchi is still recognized for his artwork on furniture, gardens, ceramics and architecture. Although considered subtle and bold during his time, his work is now the standard for modern and expressionist art.

Owing to his mixed heritage, Isamu Noguchi was an internationalist and it is during his travels that he picked up the inspiration to express himself in sculptures. His inspiration for large scale sculpture works with a story actually came from Mexico. He would then incorporate Japanese tranquil garden and earthy ceramic setup as well as the Chinese light ink brushing technique into his work. As one would imagine, what he created from bringing together these different aspects was epic creativity. Once he had settled in his trade, he would maintain studios in New York and Japan, perhaps to declare allegiance to his roots. The works of Isamu Noguchi are evidently aimed at enhancing harmony in human coexistence. The blend of Western and Eastern cultures, modern and traditional life, organic and geometric alignment of nature are some of the efforts Isamu Noguchi made to create tranquility in his work.

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 2
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 3
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

Isamu Noguchi - Octetra, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, USA
Isamu NoguchiOctetra, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, USA

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