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They quickly disappeared: Four massive ice sculptures at the North Pole

They quickly disappeared: Four massive ice sculptures at the North Pole

Andy Goldsworthy - Touching North, 1989, North Pole
Andy GoldsworthyTouching North, 1989, North Pole

In 1989, Andy Goldsworthy created four massive snow rings at one the most remote place on Planet Earth, the North Pole. These ephemeral sculptures marked the position of the North Pole, and were built around it. Through any of the four sculptures, the direction will always be south.

The material was cut and built in the white on white environment. The artist learned snow-cutting and packing techniques from a traditional indigenous source, an Inuit based in the Ellesmere Island, Canada’s third-largest island, the 10th-largest island in the world and the most northerly island in the Arctic Archipelago. In winter 1989, before leaving for the North Pole, he wrote: “It belongs to no one — it is the Earth’s common — an ever changing landscape in which whatever I make will soon disappear.”

Andy Goldsworthy (b. 1956) is a British sculptor, mostly known for his site-specific sculptures and land art. He lives and works in Scotland.

Andy Goldsworthy - Touching North, 1989, part 1 out of 4, North Pole
Andy GoldsworthyTouching North, 1989, part 1 out of 4, North Pole

Andy Goldsworthy - Touching North, 1989, part 2 out of 4, North Pole
Andy GoldsworthyTouching North, 1989, part 2 out of 4, North Pole

Andy Goldsworthy - Touching North, 1989, part 3 out of 4, North Pole
Andy GoldsworthyTouching North, 1989, part 3 out of 4, North Pole

Andy Goldsworthy - Touching North, 1989, part 4 out of 4, North Pole
Andy GoldsworthyTouching North, 1989, part 4 out of 4, North Pole

Andy Goldsworthy - Touching North, 1989, North Pole


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Still life painting covers facade of museum in LA

Still life painting covers facade of museum in LA

Jonas Wood - Still Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles 1
Jonas WoodStill Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Photo: Elon Schoenholz

The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles may feel hidden because of its downtown location. For a long time since it was designed by Japanese architect Arata Isozaki, it has been associated with its less conspicuous qualities. Since L.A. painter Jonas Wood covered the museum building facade with a reproduction of his Still Life With Two Owls painting of 2014, the vinyl production has not only revitalized the downtown street but the museum’s interior as well.

There is no shortage of dazzling architecture in the modern era and for a museum to stay quiet in a vibrant city like Los Angeles feels odd. Thanks to Wood, the 500m2 facade has covered the museum’s exterior with a mural that depicts plants in a variety of decorated ceramic vessels. There is no doubt that the flowers and splash of color that has been used in the vinyl gives the temperature outside the museum a complete makeover.

The choice of color that Wood uses is peculiar to him as he has for a long time taken pride in creating brightly hued portraits and still life drawings with generous amounts of color combinations. This current project has taken him since 2014 and the final touches were being made in 2017. For an artist of his caliber to sit back and describe his work as exuberant, it is because he too believes in the effect it is going to create. This is the reaction Wood has as he sees the rendering team working to set the paint on the wall. There is no doubt that the colors will come to life just like the artist intended.

Such effort in lightening up an outdoor space is worth it even if the light only lasts a while. The decision to use vinyl is deliberate because not only does it adhere to the wall, but it keeps the facade intact. While Wood’s mural is currently vibrant, in time it will need to pave way for another artist to showcase their ideas. As the face of the museum takes a transformational curve, it will give art lovers new hope and desire to see what is on display.

As its run comes to a close, Wood’s vinyl mural will have to peel off the wall but its magnificence does not come down with it. In this technological era, his work will be immortalized on smartphones and social media pages.

Jonas Wood - Still Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles 2
Jonas WoodStill Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Photo: Elon Schoenholz

Jonas Wood - Still Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles 3
Jonas WoodStill Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Photo: Elon Schoenholz

Jonas Wood - Still Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles 4
Jonas WoodStill Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Photo: Elon Schoenholz

Jonas Wood - Still Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Photo Christina House : For The Times 2
Jonas WoodStill Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Photo: Christina House / For The Times

Jonas Wood - Still Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles 5
Jonas WoodStill Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Photo: Christina House / For The Times

Jonas Wood - Still Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Photo Christina House : For The Times 3
Jonas WoodStill Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Photo: Elon Schoenholz

Jonas Wood - Still Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Photo Christina House : For The Times 1
Jonas WoodStill Life with Two Owls, 2016, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Photo: Christina House / For The Times


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Surprising freestanding waterfall at famous French landmark

Surprising freestanding waterfall at famous French landmark

Olafur Eliasson - Waterfall, 2016, Chateau de Versailles, Versailles, France, Photo Anders Sune Berg

Olafur Eliasson - Waterfall, 2016, Chateau de Versailles, Versailles, France, Photo Anders Sune Berg
Olafur EliassonWaterfall, 2016, crane, water, stainless steel, pump system, hose, ballast, Chateau de Versailles, Versailles, France
Photo: Anders Sune Berg

In his 2016 work on the Versailles waterfall, Olafur Eliasson made displacements and destabilization which have changed the perceptions people had about the famous landmark. Before he began his work, he approached the Chateau and gardens of Versailles to experiment whether the project was implementable. His work didn’t involve installation of objects, but rather coming up with an apparatus which kept visitors engaged. The erection of the ‘waterfall’ in the Grand Canal where a surge of water rushes down a crane standing tall in the air turned into a major tourist attraction. This installation was inspired by Louis XIV’s landscape architect André Le Nôtre who had a vision of creating a waterfall in the palace gardens, but he passed on before he did it.

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“Giant Galactic Space Penis” is larger than life (SFW/video)

“Giant Galactic Space Penis” is larger than life (SFW/video)

Voina - Giant Galactic Space DicK, 2010

Voina - Giant Galactic Space DicK, 2010

VoinaGiant Galactic Space Dick, 2010, 55 liter of white emulsion paint, 65x27m, Liteiny Bridge, St. Petersburg, Russia

A group of Moscow art members also known as the “Members of War” or more popularly as Voina have racked up quite the reputation for themselves as art rebels. The group is famous for faking gay beatings at local malls or portraying Russia’s federal museum director in an orgy. On the morning of famed revolutionary Che Guevara’s birthday in 2010 the group created a 65m (213ft) tall drawing of a gigantic penis on the Foundry Bridge. The drawing did not take long to complete (23 seconds), however, it did deliver in terms of the message that Voina wanted to pass across.

In short, the drawing of the penis was created as a giant “fuck you” to all the Russian authorities that have operated through years with corruption, impunity, and oppression. According to members of the group, the large drawing would rise and fall every time it was raised to allow passing ships beneath through. It was framed on the Foundry Bridge because the bridge represented the striking architecture of the former capital city of the Russian Empire.

When the Foundry Bridge rose as it does every morning, the galactic penis that was created by the group faced the Federal Security Service (FSB) windows directly. The renegade art group created the image to send a simple message; that Russian government officials were corrupt and that the public was aware and willing to do something about it.

Needless to say, the leader of the group was arrested, but not before thousands of bridge users, city residents and FSB agents from across the city had received the message. Some of them took the opportunity to take photos of this political statement and it made rounds in some of the most popular social media platforms.

According to Voina, another group of activists was supposed to spell out the FSB acronym to clarify who the recipients of the message were, however, the activists did not make it to the daring graffiti installation. The security guards at the bridge were perceptibly annoyed by the installation; however, the local police seemed to find humor in the galactic penis.

Voina, although unconventional in the techniques, managed to snag a nomination from a prestigious government-sponsored art award. Up to this day, the giant galactic space penis, now dubbed “the penis in FSB captivity”, has managed to inspire thousands of Russians in different ways.

Video (Russia Today)

Video (making of)


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Scale of Anish Kapoor’s sculpture is frighteningly extraordinary

Scale of Anish Kapoor’s sculpture is frighteningly extraordinary

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand
Photo: Paul Kramer

North of Auckland, in a stretch of land called Gibbs Farms, sits Anish Kapoor’s Dismemberment, Site 1 (2009). The scale of this sculpture is frighteningly extraordinary and is the largest one that Kapoor has ever created; it is the height of an 8 story building.

Unsurprisingly, the sculpture makes little effort to blend in with the expansive landscape; however, it does a great job of complementing it. The sculpture imposes itself on you, and it draws you in, dominating the area in which it sits, so much so that the sculpture appears to have always been there. This speaks to the work that went into the sculpture’s construction and design.

Kapoor had to create a free standing sculpture that would last for long, which is why the monumental sculpture was created using Serge Ferrari textile that is set up to survive harsh winds and severe weather conditions. The sculpture elicits various visual sensations and interpretations from the scores of people that arrive daily at Gibbs’s farm. At first sight, the Dismemberment sculpture looks like a swollen ear whose primary purpose is to capture the sounds and the spirit of the landscape. However, with every winding turn that you take, the sculpture transforms into a large external trumpet that appears to be signaling and calling travelers from distance lands.

In a way, it bears a resemblance to the trumpet that Joshua used to spy on the town of Jericho in the Bible. Like with every art installation, the audience reserves the right to interpret a masterpiece depending on the feelings that the piece evokes. Some people have interpreted the sculpture and found it to represent a large sized vulva, while others think that it represents the head and nucleus of a large bright flower.

Kapoor created the sculpture as a way of connecting the body to the sky. The tubular red structure symbolizes colostomy bags, and the red color represents the insides of the human body. The red is internal, but it externalizes itself in various ways. The sculpture also suggests that it may be a motherly creature that is brought forth by the earth and the tube represents flesh, skin, or a dismembered artery that is bleeding on the ground possibly feeding and rejuvenating the soil it rests on. From within, the sculpture is intimate and private, however, from inside it, the landscape emerges paving the way to new life in a fragile earth.


Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand


Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand


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Colossal bright neon pink sculpture: Impossible to ignore

Colossal bright neon pink sculpture: Impossible to ignore

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan showed his large-scale flowing sculpture in 2014. The sculpture was part of the Prospect.3: Notes for Now biennial show that occurred between October 2014 and January 2015 in New Orleans.

Strachan’s project was a declarative statement and performance that was entitled You Belong Here. The installation featured a 100-foot neon art piece that would be transported from one location to another on a 140- foot barge on the Mississippi River. The barge that carried the neon piece was made visible from different regions and places throughout New Orleans. It was created to pass on a message to the residents of the city, encouraging the city dwellers to examine themselves and what the city of New Orleans means to them and their futures.

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Why are these golden balloons all over Taipei?

Why are these golden balloons all over Taipei?

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Eslite Spectrum Songyan - Snobs
Silence Was GoldenSnobs, Eslite Spectrum Songyan

In 2015, Public Delivery collaborated with the Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art, Taiwan’s first museum to be dedicated exclusively to contemporary art and one of the most prominent art institutions of Asia. Silence Was Golden is our on-going global public art project which is centered around words or short phrases made out of golden letter shaped balloons, chosen by performers to express their feelings towards their environment and the histories surrounding it. Words were collected through an open call, and then performed together with a variety of people, including students from Tainan National University of the Arts, National Taiwan Normal University, Tamkang University and Taipei Jingmei Girls High School in different locations all over Taipei.

Up until now, the project was performed 253 times in 1/4 of the world’s countries (179 cities, 48 countries, six continents).

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Huashan Creative Park - Anxious
Silence Was GoldenAnxious, Huashan Creative Park

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall - Boss
Silence Was GoldenBoss, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Bitan Suspension Bridge - Date
Silence Was GoldenDate, Bitan Suspension Bridge

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Xindian ghost house - Fear
Silence Was GoldenFear, Xindian ghost house

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - 228 Peace Memorial Park - Hustle
Silence Was GoldenHustle, 228 Peace Memorial Park

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Museum of Contemporary Art - Noisy
Silence Was GoldenNoisy, Museum of Contemporary Art

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Elephant Mountain - Nose
Silence Was GoldenNose, Elephant Mountain

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Guang Hua Night Market - Savour
Silence Was GoldenSavour, Guang Hua Night Market

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Xindian, Bitan tea house - Tea
Silence Was GoldenTea, Bitan tea house

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall - Temple
Silence Was GoldenTemple, Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall

Map of balloon performances in Taipei, Taiwan
Map of balloon performances


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