Archive: sculpture
Scale of Anish Kapoor’s sculpture is frighteningly extraordinary

Scale of Anish Kapoor’s sculpture is frighteningly extraordinary

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand
Photo: Paul Kramer

North of Auckland, in a stretch of land called Gibbs Farms, sits Anish Kapoor’s Dismemberment, Site 1 (2009). The scale of this sculpture is frighteningly extraordinary and is the largest one that Kapoor has ever created; it is the height of an 8 story building.

Unsurprisingly, the sculpture makes little effort to blend in with the expansive landscape; however, it does a great job of complementing it. The sculpture imposes itself on you, and it draws you in, dominating the area in which it sits, so much so that the sculpture appears to have always been there. This speaks to the work that went into the sculpture’s construction and design.

Kapoor had to create a free standing sculpture that would last for long, which is why the monumental sculpture was created using Serge Ferrari textile that is set up to survive harsh winds and severe weather conditions. The sculpture elicits various visual sensations and interpretations from the scores of people that arrive daily at Gibbs’s farm. At first sight, the Dismemberment sculpture looks like a swollen ear whose primary purpose is to capture the sounds and the spirit of the landscape. However, with every winding turn that you take, the sculpture transforms into a large external trumpet that appears to be signaling and calling travelers from distance lands.

In a way, it bears a resemblance to the trumpet that Joshua used to spy on the town of Jericho in the Bible. Like with every art installation, the audience reserves the right to interpret a masterpiece depending on the feelings that the piece evokes. Some people have interpreted the sculpture and found it to represent a large sized vulva, while others think that it represents the head and nucleus of a large bright flower.

Kapoor created the sculpture as a way of connecting the body to the sky. The tubular red structure symbolizes colostomy bags, and the red color represents the insides of the human body. The red is internal, but it externalizes itself in various ways. The sculpture also suggests that it may be a motherly creature that is brought forth by the earth and the tube represents flesh, skin, or a dismembered artery that is bleeding on the ground possibly feeding and rejuvenating the soil it rests on. From within, the sculpture is intimate and private, however, from inside it, the landscape emerges paving the way to new life in a fragile earth.


Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand


Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand

Anish Kapoor - Dismemberment, Site 1, 2009
Anish KapoorDismemberment, Site 1, 2009, mild steel tube and tensioned fabric. Each end 25x8m, length 85m, Gibbs Farm, Kaipara Harbour, New Zealand


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Colossal bright neon pink sculpture: Impossible to ignore

Colossal bright neon pink sculpture: Impossible to ignore

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan showed his large-scale flowing sculpture in 2014. The sculpture was part of the Prospect.3: Notes for Now biennial show that occurred between October 2014 and January 2015 in New Orleans.

Strachan’s project was a declarative statement and performance that was entitled You Belong Here. The installation featured a 100-foot neon art piece that would be transported from one location to another on a 140- foot barge on the Mississippi River. The barge that carried the neon piece was made visible from different regions and places throughout New Orleans. It was created to pass on a message to the residents of the city, encouraging the city dwellers to examine themselves and what the city of New Orleans means to them and their futures.

Tavares Strachan’s 20-foot-tall letters displayed in bright neon pink were impossible to ignore. Strachan used a bright, curly script and an onboard generator to communicate the words. The New Orleans project took more than 2 years to design and complete.

While the majority of the artists participating in Prospect 3 displayed their projects inside public spaces, Strachan’s work floated on a river, which means that it was experienced and observed by a significant number of people living and working in the city. The installation also existed as an app that could be accessed through smartphones and other mobile devices. The app not only allowed the public to experience the piece, but it also welcomed commentary and opinions from the locals.

While the installation was not specifically designed to render the warmth and the survivalist nature of New Orleans, many individuals that saw it chose to interpret the words ‘you belong here’ at face value. They took it as a call to welcome any new visitors to the city and as a warm appreciation for the people that had already lived there for years. In many ways, however, the phrase was intended to echo not just the welcoming sentiments of the city but to make people uncomfortable; to ask people to define who they really are in the context of New Orleans.

Unlike other projects and installations that are typically displayed in galleries and open spaces, this piece was showcased on a broad and undulating space- the Mississippi River.´ Since the barge would move from location to location, the ‘here’ portion of the phrase was constantly changing, which made the phrase ‘you belong here’ more ambiguous. The installation was dismantled at some point in January much to the dismay of the locals that wanted it to be on permanent display.

Video

https://vimeo.com/112997308
Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Preparation of Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3

Tavares Strachan - You Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1x24.4m
Preparation of Tavares StrachanYou Belong Here, 2014, blocked out neon, 9.1×24.4m, on Mississippi River, New Orleans, USA, for Prospect New Orleans’ triennial, Prospect.3


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Controversial sculpture cut into 3 pieces after heated debate

Controversial sculpture cut into 3 pieces after heated debate

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra is a leading sculptor who is known for creating minimalist artwork. While he began his career after studying fine arts at Yale University, he created the sculpture Tilted Arc in 1981 New York after celebrating his fortieth birthday. By this time he was already highly recognized and this is one of the reasons so much attention has been given to what became of the Titled Arc, an artwork that was intended to grace the Foley Federal Plaza for a long time would be relocated in 1989 after it became the subject of a heated debate.

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World’s worst criminal regretting his sins

World’s worst criminal regretting his sins

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP

How much penance do the atrocities that Adolf Hitler committed in his lifetime require to be forgiven? This is perhaps the question which Maurizio Cattelan wanted to arouse in his audience when he drew a picture of the Nazi leader in a kneeling position. There is nothing wrong with someone kneeling down in prayer and in fact, it is an aspect of humanity that keeps us humble. With this in mind, it is hard to imagine that the person seeking forgiveness exercised untold torture on fellow human beings. If approached from behind, one cannot help but marvel at the self-discipline and commitment that this young boy eludes. It is not until one gets close enough that they realize that the neatly pressed school boy attire, fresh raven hair and well-polished shoes, actually belong to a leader whose name still raises goose bumps in the present day.

We might never fully understand the inspiration behind Him, which even in comparison to other works by Cattelan that were created at the same time, stands out as the most shocking piece on display. In his defense, Maurizio Cattelan has distances himself from provocative art but instead choses to refer to himself as a realistic artist. By borrowing pieces of reality from different eras throughout history, he has been able to create classics like the Him.

To choose to use Hitler as the subject of an art piece is rather bold as he represents such profound evil that is even hard to come to terms with. Is the dictator actually seeking for forgiveness? Having lived like he was above the authority of God, it does seem awkward yet humbling that he would kneel down. People do not like to be judged because they feel that all their actions are justifiable and this artwork contradicts this very nature of humanity. For as many as questioned the sincerity of Hitler in this assumed praying position, the lingering questions is whether he deserves to be forgiven.

Him, has definitely aroused its fair share of controversy; Hitler is the epitome of human suffering and pain inflicted by one’s own kind so it can be quite disheartening to fathom him walking free of any blame. From the rear, this picture of a small boy kneeling down in prayer causes one to appreciate the upbringing of the boy so far. Hitler is no young man neither is he innocent and the face, when viewed from the front, gives this away. Everybody seems to have a different opinion of why the artist chose to do this piece, but the record $17.2 million at Christie’s in 2016 for his work is proof enough that the artist created a masterpiece.

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP
Photo: AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP, Monnaie de Paris, Paris, France, 2016
Photo: Silvia Neri

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP, Monnaie de Paris, Paris, France, 2016

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP, Monnaie de Paris, Paris, France, 2016

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP


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Bridging cultures with influential sculptures & furniture

Bridging cultures with influential sculptures & furniture

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 1

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 1
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

A walk through Japan reveals the close correlation between nature and aesthetics. Amid the natural setup are works of art that remind everyone about the history, beliefs and affiliations of the Japanese people. The modern art concept of creating spectacular pieces to create an art park is becoming rather common owing to the pioneer work of artists like Isamu Noguchi. Having been an artist for 60 years, he has helped shape the aesthetic and cultural appearance of Japan and the US through the creation of sculpture parks. Even in death, Noguchi is still recognized for his artwork on furniture, gardens, ceramics and architecture. Although considered subtle and bold during his time, his work is now the standard for modern and expressionist art.

Owing to his mixed heritage, Isamu Noguchi was an internationalist and it is during his travels that he picked up the inspiration to express himself in sculptures. His inspiration for large scale sculpture works with a story actually came from Mexico. He would then incorporate Japanese tranquil garden and earthy ceramic setup as well as the Chinese light ink brushing technique into his work. As one would imagine, what he created from bringing together these different aspects was epic creativity. Once he had settled in his trade, he would maintain studios in New York and Japan, perhaps to declare allegiance to his roots. The works of Isamu Noguchi are evidently aimed at enhancing harmony in human coexistence. The blend of Western and Eastern cultures, modern and traditional life, organic and geometric alignment of nature are some of the efforts Isamu Noguchi made to create tranquility in his work.

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 2
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 3
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

Isamu Noguchi - Octetra, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, USA
Isamu NoguchiOctetra, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, USA

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Attractive & repulsive – Detailed models of cathedral-like trucks

Attractive & repulsive – Detailed models of cathedral-like trucks

Wim Delvoye - Caterpillar nr. 5, Beaufort Triennial, Middelkerke, Westende, Belgium

Wim Delvoye - Caterpillar nr. 5, Beaufort Triennial, Middelkerke, Westende, Belgium
Wim DelvoyeCaterpillar nr. 5, at Beaufort Triennial, Middelkerke, Westende, Belgium

Wim Delvoye is a neo-conceptual artist that is well known for his innovative and sometimes out-of-the-box projects. He connects the attractive and the repulsive in an effortless way, creating works that are inherent contradictions. When you see his pieces for the first time, you almost feel repulsed, then seduced, and finally held in awe of his craftsmanship and aesthetic.

His work is indiscriminate, as was the case with Cloaca and he dares to challenge the art industry and the inconsequence of contemporary art production, questioning the commoditization of contemporary work where the value of the art is more important than what it represents. At the Louvre Museum, one of his gothic works juxtaposed carpeted pigs that had been taxidermied with grand crystal chandeliers in Napoleon III’s apartment. In another piece, he placed a colossal 11-meter phallic globe that looks like a corkscrew suppository right beneath the museum’s glass pyramid.

There is no doubt that Delvoye thrives in challenging audiences to be more open minded by making them feel perturbed and on edge. His non-conformist style and showmanship sets him apart from other artists as he dares to alter people’s ideas of beauty where he continually associates the repulsive with the attractive. Even though his gothic works have stirred a lot of controversies, it is evident that he makes every effort possible to ensure that every element is as he needs it to be.

His gothic works show off his extensive artisanal skills such as embossing, steel work, weaving, tattooing and glass making. His ornate steel and stainless steel gothic cathedral trucks showcase a level of skill and craftsmanship that can only be described as ‘so Delvoye.’ The scale models of the cathedral trucks that were created using the architecture and the visual quality of the gothic era marry so well to create a contrast between gothic craftsmanship and the machine-based exterior of the vehicles.

The amount of detail featured in the models is astounding, and more importantly, it challenges the viewer’s perception of things. The more daring thinker, ought to appreciate his talent for connecting two seemingly impossibly incompatible styles to produce masterful works of art.

Wim Delvoye - D11, 2008, laser-cut Corten steel, 117x127x270cm, Installation view, Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels, Belgium, 2008
Wim DelvoyeD11, 2008, laser-cut Corten steel, 117x127x270cm, Installation view, Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels, Belgium, 2008

Wim Delvoye - Cement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium 1
Wim DelvoyeCement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium

Wim Delvoye - Cement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium 2
Wim DelvoyeCement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium

Wim Delvoye - Cement Truck, 2007, laser-cut Corten stell, 802x225x352, MONA Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania, Australia
Wim DelvoyeCement Truck, 2007, laser-cut Corten stell, 802x225x352, MONA Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania, Australia

Wim Delvoye - Concrete Mixer, Laser-cut Stainless Steel 2
Wim DelvoyeConcrete Mixer, 2007, laser-cut stainless steel

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Unpredictable paintings on walls inside of museums

Unpredictable paintings on walls inside of museums

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, 2013

ADA, a kinetic sculpture by Karina Smigla-Bobinski, stands out for being interactive and unpredictable; Imagine a giant ball that is filled with helium gas and its surface covered with charcoal spikes. The helium causes the ball to be suspended in the air and the charcoal sticks provide grips and a medium with which to create art.

Through numerous exhibitions ADA is getting immense attention from visitors and the best part is, you do not have to be an artist yourself to enjoy the experience. Visitors get to push the ball which moves freely in space because it is not attached to anything and as the ball comes into contact with the surrounding walls, the charcoal sticks draw ambiguous lines on them. The result of what is drawn is never predictable and it is perhaps this feeling of suspense that keeps visitors coming back.

ADA is a transparent globe that resembles a molecular hybrid. The helium inside it and the hedgehog like surface give it an autonomous bounce from wall to wall. The ball is covered with 300 charcoal sticks with a spacing of 10 inches from one another. The technique behind it was developed by Smigla-Bobinski purposely for this art piece. Moving the ball to create patterns on the wall is interesting but what is even more enjoyable to do is to watch as people try to control the ball with their weight.

While the charcoal sticks come into contact with the white walls, every stroke is unique because of the direction in which the ball is thrust, the force applied, the level to which it is bent and the angle of contact with the wall. You will be frustrated if you approach this activity with intelligence so visitors are advised to just flow with the energy of the ball as their energy floats with it.

The artist Smigla-Bobisnki might never fully understand the therapeutic nature of what she had created but here is a canvas that was started by an expert and is being completed by anyone who has the interest and time to play with a floating ball of helium.

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, The Lowry, Manchester, UK, 2015
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, The Lowry, Manchester, UK, 2015

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, 2013

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSjajlm3Bk0


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