Archive: sculpture
Controversial sculpture cut into 3 pieces after heated debate

Controversial sculpture cut into 3 pieces after heated debate

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra is a leading sculptor who is known for creating minimalist artwork. While he began his career after studying fine arts at Yale University, he created the sculpture Tilted Arc in 1981 New York after celebrating his fortieth birthday. By this time he was already highly recognized and this is one of the reasons so much attention has been given to what became of the Titled Arc, an artwork that was intended to grace the Foley Federal Plaza for a long time would be relocated in 1989 after it became the subject of a heated debate.

The Tilted Arc was commissioned by the United States General Services Administration (GSA) and from Serra’s own assessment, he had purposed for it to be placed at the Foley Federal Plaza in front of the Jacob K. Javits Federal Building in Lower Manhattan.

Built to stand at 3.7m high and spanning 38m long, the unique feature of the tilted arc was its lean to one side. It would have been a permanent addition to this busy part of the city had the administration taken time to prepare the people before its arrival. To the office workers, the artwork appeared to them as ugly and oppressive, an obstacle which had the potential to catch graffiti. Outright protests began to have it pulled down or transferred when two petitions gathered a total of 1,300 signatures. Since the GSA had commissioned the work and thought it was good at the particular area, they stood by their decision arguing that 1,300 signatures against a local population of 10,000 was not enough to influence their decision.

This strong position would be later overturned when a new mayor was installed in 1984; over a hearing that lasted 3 days and with the new mayor as the leader of the adjudicating panel. Richard Serra also spoke at the hearing, maintaining his position that the arc was built purposefully for that location and moving it from there would destroy it. 122 speakers were in favor of the arc while slightly over 50 were against it. Even when Serra sued the court, it was passed that the arc would be destroyed on order and the remains taken by Serra if he wished.

The artwork was removed in 1989, the Tilted Arc was dislodged from the ground and cut into 3 pieces. Today, the spot on which the arc stood has been replaced by landscape architectural components to liven up the place.

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York, Photo Frank Martin/BIPs/Getty Images
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York
Photo: Frank Martin/BIPs/Getty Images

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York
Photo: Elizabeth Sasser

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York
Photo: Elizabeth Sasser

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York

Richard Serra - Tilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in lower Manhattan, New York
Richard SerraTilted Arc, 1981, COR-TEN steel, 37m long, 3.7m tall, 6.4cm thick, Federal Plaza in Lower Manhattan, New York


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World’s worst criminal regretting his sins

World’s worst criminal regretting his sins

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP

How much penance do the atrocities that Adolf Hitler committed in his lifetime require to be forgiven? This is perhaps the question which Maurizio Cattelan wanted to arouse in his audience when he drew a picture of the Nazi leader in a kneeling position. There is nothing wrong with someone kneeling down in prayer and in fact, it is an aspect of humanity that keeps us humble. With this in mind, it is hard to imagine that the person seeking forgiveness exercised untold torture on fellow human beings. If approached from behind, one cannot help but marvel at the self-discipline and commitment that this young boy eludes. It is not until one gets close enough that they realize that the neatly pressed school boy attire, fresh raven hair and well-polished shoes, actually belong to a leader whose name still raises goose bumps in the present day.

We might never fully understand the inspiration behind Him, which even in comparison to other works by Cattelan that were created at the same time, stands out as the most shocking piece on display. In his defense, Maurizio Cattelan has distances himself from provocative art but instead choses to refer to himself as a realistic artist. By borrowing pieces of reality from different eras throughout history, he has been able to create classics like the Him.

To choose to use Hitler as the subject of an art piece is rather bold as he represents such profound evil that is even hard to come to terms with. Is the dictator actually seeking for forgiveness? Having lived like he was above the authority of God, it does seem awkward yet humbling that he would kneel down. People do not like to be judged because they feel that all their actions are justifiable and this artwork contradicts this very nature of humanity. For as many as questioned the sincerity of Hitler in this assumed praying position, the lingering questions is whether he deserves to be forgiven.

Him, has definitely aroused its fair share of controversy; Hitler is the epitome of human suffering and pain inflicted by one’s own kind so it can be quite disheartening to fathom him walking free of any blame. From the rear, this picture of a small boy kneeling down in prayer causes one to appreciate the upbringing of the boy so far. Hitler is no young man neither is he innocent and the face, when viewed from the front, gives this away. Everybody seems to have a different opinion of why the artist chose to do this piece, but the record $17.2 million at Christie’s in 2016 for his work is proof enough that the artist created a masterpiece.

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP
Photo: AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP, Monnaie de Paris, Paris, France, 2016
Photo: Silvia Neri

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP, Monnaie de Paris, Paris, France, 2016

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP, Monnaie de Paris, Paris, France, 2016

Maurizio Cattelan - Him
Maurizio CattelanHim, 2001, wax, human hair, suit, polyester resin and pigment, 101×43.1×63.5cm, Edition of 3 + AP


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Bridging cultures with influential sculptures & furniture

Bridging cultures with influential sculptures & furniture

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 1

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 1
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

A walk through Japan reveals the close correlation between nature and aesthetics. Amid the natural setup are works of art that remind everyone about the history, beliefs and affiliations of the Japanese people. The modern art concept of creating spectacular pieces to create an art park is becoming rather common owing to the pioneer work of artists like Isamu Noguchi. Having been an artist for 60 years, he has helped shape the aesthetic and cultural appearance of Japan and the US through the creation of sculpture parks. Even in death, Noguchi is still recognized for his artwork on furniture, gardens, ceramics and architecture. Although considered subtle and bold during his time, his work is now the standard for modern and expressionist art.

Owing to his mixed heritage, Isamu Noguchi was an internationalist and it is during his travels that he picked up the inspiration to express himself in sculptures. His inspiration for large scale sculpture works with a story actually came from Mexico. He would then incorporate Japanese tranquil garden and earthy ceramic setup as well as the Chinese light ink brushing technique into his work. As one would imagine, what he created from bringing together these different aspects was epic creativity. Once he had settled in his trade, he would maintain studios in New York and Japan, perhaps to declare allegiance to his roots. The works of Isamu Noguchi are evidently aimed at enhancing harmony in human coexistence. The blend of Western and Eastern cultures, modern and traditional life, organic and geometric alignment of nature are some of the efforts Isamu Noguchi made to create tranquility in his work.

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 2
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

Isamu Noguchi - Red Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA 3
Isamu NoguchiRed Cube Sculpture, 1968, 140 Broadway Between Cedar and Liberty Streets, Financial District in Lower Manhattan, New York, USA

Isamu Noguchi - Octetra, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, USA
Isamu NoguchiOctetra, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, USA

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Attractive & repulsive – Detailed models of cathedral-like trucks

Attractive & repulsive – Detailed models of cathedral-like trucks

Wim Delvoye - Caterpillar nr. 5, Beaufort Triennial, Middelkerke, Westende, Belgium

Wim Delvoye - Caterpillar nr. 5, Beaufort Triennial, Middelkerke, Westende, Belgium
Wim DelvoyeCaterpillar nr. 5, at Beaufort Triennial, Middelkerke, Westende, Belgium

Wim Delvoye is a neo-conceptual artist that is well known for his innovative and sometimes out-of-the-box projects. He connects the attractive and the repulsive in an effortless way, creating works that are inherent contradictions. When you see his pieces for the first time, you almost feel repulsed, then seduced, and finally held in awe of his craftsmanship and aesthetic.

His work is indiscriminate, as was the case with Cloaca and he dares to challenge the art industry and the inconsequence of contemporary art production, questioning the commoditization of contemporary work where the value of the art is more important than what it represents. At the Louvre Museum, one of his gothic works juxtaposed carpeted pigs that had been taxidermied with grand crystal chandeliers in Napoleon III’s apartment. In another piece, he placed a colossal 11-meter phallic globe that looks like a corkscrew suppository right beneath the museum’s glass pyramid.

There is no doubt that Delvoye thrives in challenging audiences to be more open minded by making them feel perturbed and on edge. His non-conformist style and showmanship sets him apart from other artists as he dares to alter people’s ideas of beauty where he continually associates the repulsive with the attractive. Even though his gothic works have stirred a lot of controversies, it is evident that he makes every effort possible to ensure that every element is as he needs it to be.

His gothic works show off his extensive artisanal skills such as embossing, steel work, weaving, tattooing and glass making. His ornate steel and stainless steel gothic cathedral trucks showcase a level of skill and craftsmanship that can only be described as ‘so Delvoye.’ The scale models of the cathedral trucks that were created using the architecture and the visual quality of the gothic era marry so well to create a contrast between gothic craftsmanship and the machine-based exterior of the vehicles.

The amount of detail featured in the models is astounding, and more importantly, it challenges the viewer’s perception of things. The more daring thinker, ought to appreciate his talent for connecting two seemingly impossibly incompatible styles to produce masterful works of art.

Wim Delvoye - D11, 2008, laser-cut Corten steel, 117x127x270cm, Installation view, Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels, Belgium, 2008
Wim DelvoyeD11, 2008, laser-cut Corten steel, 117x127x270cm, Installation view, Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels, Belgium, 2008

Wim Delvoye - Cement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium 1
Wim DelvoyeCement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium

Wim Delvoye - Cement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium 2
Wim DelvoyeCement Truck, 2010, laser-cut Corten stell, 980x408x213cm, KVS, Brussels, Belgium

Wim Delvoye - Cement Truck, 2007, laser-cut Corten stell, 802x225x352, MONA Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania, Australia
Wim DelvoyeCement Truck, 2007, laser-cut Corten stell, 802x225x352, MONA Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania, Australia

Wim Delvoye - Concrete Mixer, Laser-cut Stainless Steel 2
Wim DelvoyeConcrete Mixer, 2007, laser-cut stainless steel

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Unpredictable paintings on walls inside of museums

Unpredictable paintings on walls inside of museums

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, 2013

ADA, a kinetic sculpture by Karina Smigla-Bobinski, stands out for being interactive and unpredictable; Imagine a giant ball that is filled with helium gas and its surface covered with charcoal spikes. The helium causes the ball to be suspended in the air and the charcoal sticks provide grips and a medium with which to create art.

Through numerous exhibitions ADA is getting immense attention from visitors and the best part is, you do not have to be an artist yourself to enjoy the experience. Visitors get to push the ball which moves freely in space because it is not attached to anything and as the ball comes into contact with the surrounding walls, the charcoal sticks draw ambiguous lines on them. The result of what is drawn is never predictable and it is perhaps this feeling of suspense that keeps visitors coming back.

ADA is a transparent globe that resembles a molecular hybrid. The helium inside it and the hedgehog like surface give it an autonomous bounce from wall to wall. The ball is covered with 300 charcoal sticks with a spacing of 10 inches from one another. The technique behind it was developed by Smigla-Bobinski purposely for this art piece. Moving the ball to create patterns on the wall is interesting but what is even more enjoyable to do is to watch as people try to control the ball with their weight.

While the charcoal sticks come into contact with the white walls, every stroke is unique because of the direction in which the ball is thrust, the force applied, the level to which it is bent and the angle of contact with the wall. You will be frustrated if you approach this activity with intelligence so visitors are advised to just flow with the energy of the ball as their energy floats with it.

The artist Smigla-Bobisnki might never fully understand the therapeutic nature of what she had created but here is a canvas that was started by an expert and is being completed by anyone who has the interest and time to play with a floating ball of helium.

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, The Lowry, Manchester, UK, 2015
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, The Lowry, Manchester, UK, 2015

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, 2013

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSjajlm3Bk0


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Colorful artwork in Las Vegas desert

Colorful artwork in Las Vegas desert

Ugo Rondinone - Seven Magic Mountains Las Vegas, Nevada, 2016
Ugo RondinoneSeven Magic Mountains Las Vegas, Nevada, 2016

Seven Magic Mountains by Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone sits comfortably in the desert south of Las Vegas in Nevada. The colossal work is made up of seven towering sculptures of stones weighing up to a ton each. The huge limestone boulders are stacked on top of one another. Each tower is made up of three to six stones and each stone has a specific colour with each stack standing as high as 9 to 10.5 meters. Seven Magic Mountains is now one of the largest land-based art installations in the United States in the last 40 years.

Ugo Rondinone is known to be a lover of nature and some of his works revolve around the sun, the moon, and the cosmos. The artwork goes further to emphasize the kind of interest the artist has in natural phenomena and how they reformulate in art, and refers to the natural world, existentialism and romanticism all concurrently in a mental trinity that the artist’s works have been known for. According to the artist, Seven Magic Mountains brings out the togetherness and unity between nature and human, natural and artificial, as well as the past and the present.

This work became like a special art pilgrim site as it evokes a kind of spirituality that is bound to have spectators engaged and leave them in awe. The location brings about a feeling of stability from the mammoth sizes of the boulders. Seven Magic Mountains is placed strategically such that viewers will be able to view it from different angles and perspectives, and is getting the expected reactions from the public. Whenever people stumble upon it, they smile and bring out their phones to take pictures. It is also making waves on social media as many people are talking about it.

Ugo Rondinone - Seven Magic Mountains Las Vegas, Nevada, 2016
Ugo RondinoneSeven Magic Mountains Las Vegas, Nevada, 2016

Ugo Rondinone - Seven Magic Mountains Las Vegas, Nevada, 2016. Photo by Gianfranco Gorgoni. Courtesy of Art Production Fund and Nevada Museum of Art
Ugo RondinoneSeven Magic Mountains Las Vegas, Nevada, 2016
Photo: Gianfranco Gorgoni. Courtesy of Art Production Fund and Nevada Museum of Art

Ugo Rondinone - Seven Magic Mountains Las Vegas, Nevada, 2016
Ugo RondinoneSeven Magic Mountains Las Vegas, Nevada, 2016 (installation)

Ugo Rondinone, Miami Mountain, The Bass, Miami Beach, 2016
Ugo RondinoneMiami Mountain, The Bass, Miami Beach, 2016

Ugo Rondinone, Miami Mountain, The Bass, Miami Beach, 2016
Ugo RondinoneMiami Mountain, The Bass, Miami Beach, 2016

Ugo Rondinone - Installation view, Clouds + Mountains + Waterfalls, Sadie Coles HQ. Copyright the artist, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London.
Ugo Rondinone – Installation view, Clouds + Mountains + Waterfalls, Sadie Coles HQ. Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

Ugo Rondinone - Unique Stone Sculptures
Ugo RondinoneUnique Stone Sculptures

Ugo Rondinone - Purple Pink Red Orange Yellow Green Mountain
Ugo RondinonePurple Pink Red Orange Yellow Green Mountain

Ugo Rondinone - Black Blue Pink Mountain, 2015, painted stone, stainless steel, pedestal, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London
Ugo RondinoneBlack Blue Pink Mountain, 2015, painted stone, stainless steel, pedestal
Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

Ugo Rondinone - Orange Yellow Green Blue Pink Red mountain Mountain, 2015, painted stone, stainless steel, pedestal, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London
Ugo RondinoneOrange Yellow Green Blue Pink Red mountain Mountain, 2015, painted stone, stainless steel, pedestal
Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

Ugo Rondinone - Unique Stone Sculpture Blue
Ugo RondinoneUnique Stone Sculpture Blue

Ugo Rondinone - Yellow Pink Red Mountain, 2015, painted stone, stainless steel, pedestal, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London
Ugo RondinoneYellow Pink Red Mountain, 2015, painted stone, stainless steel, pedestal
Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

Ugo Rondinone - Blue black white mountain, 2015. Copyright the artist, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London.
Ugo RondinoneBlue Black White Mountain, 2015, painted stone, stainless steel, pedestal
Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

Ugo Rondinone - Blue yellow mountain, 2015. Copyright the artist, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London.
Ugo RondinoneBlue Yellow Mountain, 2015, painted stone, stainless steel, pedestal
Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

Ugo Rondinone - Green yellow orange red pink mountain, 2015. Copyright the artist, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London.
Ugo RondinoneGreen Yellow Orange Red Pink Mountain, 2015, painted stone, stainless steel, pedestal
Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London

Ugo Rondinone - Red silver yellow mountain, 2015. Copyright the artist, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London.
Ugo RondinoneRed Silver Yellow Mountain, 2015, painted stone, stainless steel, pedestal
Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London


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Artist mocks Koons highest priced work using garbage bags

Artist mocks Koons highest priced work using garbage bags

Gimhongsok - Canine Construction, 2009, bronze
GimhongsokCanine Construction, 2009, 164x231x90cm

This Canine Construction by South Korean artist, Gimhongsok is one that anyone would fall in love with, coupled with the enigmatic quality it has. This work is the sculpture of a dog remains one of the artist’s most well-known works in recent times. The creation involved using garbage bags, balloons, cardboard boxes, all assembled with expensive materials like resin.

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