Archive: sculpture
Colorful artwork in Las Vegas desert

Colorful artwork in Las Vegas desert

Ugo Rondinone - Seven Magic Mountains Las Vegas, Nevada, 2016
Ugo RondinoneSeven Magic Mountains Las Vegas, Nevada, 2016

Seven Magic Mountains by Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone sits comfortably in the desert south of Las Vegas in Nevada. The colossal work is made up of seven towering sculptures of stones weighing up to a ton each. The huge limestone boulders are stacked on top of one another. Each tower is made up of three to six stones and each stone has a specific colour with each stack standing as high as 9 to 10.5 meters. Seven Magic Mountains is now one of the largest land-based art installations in the United States in the last 40 years.

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Artist mocks Koons highest priced work using garbage bags

Artist mocks Koons highest priced work using garbage bags

Gimhongsok - Canine Construction, 2009, bronze
GimhongsokCanine Construction, 2009, 164x231x90cm

This Canine Construction by South Korean artist, Gimhongsok is one that anyone would fall in love with, coupled with the enigmatic quality it has. This work is the sculpture of a dog remains one of the artist’s most well-known works in recent times. The creation involved using garbage bags, balloons, cardboard boxes, all assembled with expensive materials like resin.

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Would you pay $58m for this shiny dog?

Would you pay $58m for this shiny dog?

Jeff Koons - Balloon Dog (Orange), executed in 1994-2000

Jeff Koons - Balloon Dog (Orange), executed in 1994-2000
Jeff KoonsBalloon Dog (Orange), executed in 1994-2000, mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 307 x 363 x 114cm, one of five unique versions (Blue, Magenta, Orange, Red, Yellow)
Sold at Christie’s in 2013 for US$ 58,405,000

The Balloon Dog by Jeff Koons is a work of art that is about celebration for different purposes and times; A simple artwork which in its elegance would evoke a cheery scream from children if showcased at a children’s party. The Balloon Dog sculpture is made from very simple materials – stainless steel and covered with different colours: blue, magenta, orange, red and yellow. There was nothing left out of the creation even though it stands ten feet and weighs a ton. The artwork looks like a balloon twisted to shape to form a dog.

The Balloon Dog was a part of Jeff Koon’s well-known Celebration series from the early 1990s. It has been exhibited all around the world and these sculptures have been sold at huge amounts of money at different auctions. Koons said he only wanted to create a piece that showed the joys of having a celebration when he created the sculpture. As much as his own ideals were different, his work, the Balloon Dog has gone on to make him the creator of the most expensive artwork sold at auction by a living artist. Each edition of the series has sold for a different price at different times but the one that sold at the highest amount of money remains the Balloon Dog (Orange) which sold for $58,405,000 in November 2013, the highest ever paid for a piece of art by a living artist at auction anywhere in the world.

The Balloon Dog (Orange) has a very beautiful colour on a giant swollen body that has a reflective surface. This sculpture depicts weightlessness despite its huge size and heavy weight of one ton. The balloon form was made while paying utmost attention to precise details. There is a knot which serves as the nose, the twists and crimps that show the limbs are well placed and the dog’s tail which is erect and yet looks like rubber. The artist is known for making use of exact standards in his work and the Balloon Dog (Orange) is not an exception. This faultless and flawless creation is admired and loved by the audience. As much work was put into this work of art, the result is an extraordinarily beautiful sculpture which is pleasing to the eyes and makes it an enjoyable sight to behold.

Jeff Koons - Balloon Dog (Orange), 1994-2000 mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, Christie’s, NYC
Jeff KoonsBalloon Dog (Orange), executed in 1994-2000, mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 307 x 363 x 114cm, one of five unique versions (Blue, Magenta, Orange, Red, Yellow), Christie’s, NYC, USA
Sold at Christie’s in 2013 for US$ 58,405,000

Jeff Koons - Balloon Dog (Orange), 1994-2000 mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, The Brant Foundation Art Study Center, Greenwich, Connecticut
Jeff KoonsBalloon Dog (Orange), executed in 1994-2000, mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 307 x 363 x 114cm, one of five unique versions (Blue, Magenta, Orange, Red, Yellow), The Brant Foundation Art Study Center, Greenwich, Connecticut, USA
Photo: Tom Powel Imaging

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20 tons of incense ash to create 5m statue

20 tons of incense ash to create 5m statue

Zhang Huan - Sydney Buddha, 2015, aluminum, 5m height, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia

Zhang Huan - Sydney Buddha, 2015, aluminum, 5m height, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia 1
Zhang HuanSydney Buddha, left: Aluminium Buddha, 370x290x260cm, right: Ash Buddha, 350x480x290cm, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia, 2015

Zhang Huan, born in 1965, started out his career as a painter and then moved to performance art and then resorted back to painting. He is also a sculptor and photographer, but his main focus is being a performance artist. Throughout his career, he has made extensive use of ash, and even built a few sculptures with it. Zhang says that he considers ash to be symbolic as it represents the hopes and the prayers of those who usually burn the incense. To him, the ash sculptures represent collective blessing, memory, and soul of the Chinese people. The ash is collected from various temples in Shanghai, a time-consuming process that involves many hands.

When making such sculptures, the ash is compacted into the mold for a number of days, and then the aluminum sculpture is removed and reassembled facing the ash sculpture. Eventually, the ash sculpture will start trampling down after sometime, while the aluminum sculpture remains intact.

In 2015, Zhang created the Sydney Buddha, one headless metal statue, and another one made from over 20 tons of incense ash, crumbling gradually. It was named Sydney Buddha for purposes of its presentation in Australia. Initially, it was known as Taiwan Buddha. The Sydney Buddha is a meditation on the briefness of life and the various cycles that facilitate the renewal and destruction of life. This piece is made using two parts: the main sculpture made of aluminum and the incense-ash casting as the interior. These pieces are placed facing each other, and as time elapses, one of them depreciates. The Berlin Buddha is another monumental ash sculpture of Buddha, made from 6 tons of ash from burned incense. This ash has been poured into an aluminum mold that stands at 4 meters tall.

Zhang believes that each ash Buddha represents the prayers, thoughts, and hopes of mankind, which eventually collapse. This is the cycle of life and the taking action when there should be no action taken, upsets nature, in a way.

Zhang Huan - Sydney Buddha, 2015, aluminum, 5m height, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia
Zhang HuanSydney Buddha, Ash Buddha, 350x480x290cm, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia, 2015

Zhang Huan - Sydney Buddha, 2015, aluminum, 5m height, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia
Zhang HuanSydney Buddha, Aluminium Buddha, 370x290x260cm, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia, 2015

Zhang Huan - Sydney Buddha, 2015, aluminum, 5m height, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia
Zhang HuanSydney Buddha, left: Aluminium Buddha, 370x290x260cm, right: Ash Buddha, 350x480x290cm, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia, 2015

Zhang Huan - Sydney Buddha, 2015, aluminum, 5m height, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia 10
Zhang HuanSydney Buddha, Ash Buddha, 350x480x290cm, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia, 2015

Zhang Huan - Sydney Buddha, 2015, aluminum, 5m height, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia 10c
Zhang HuanSydney Buddha, Ash Buddha, 350x480x290cm, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia, 2015

Zhang Huan - Sydney Buddha, 2015, aluminum, 5m height, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia, Photo Michael Young
Zhang HuanSydney Buddha, Aluminium Buddha, 370x290x260cm, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia, 2015

Zhang Huan - Sydney Buddha, 2015, aluminum, 5m height, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia 7d
Zhang HuanSydney Buddha, Aluminium Buddha, 370x290x260cm, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia, 2015

Zhang Huan - Sydney Buddha, 2015, aluminum, 5m height, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia 7b
Zhang HuanSydney Buddha, Aluminium Buddha (detail), 370x290x260cm, Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia, 2015

Zhang Huan - Berlin Buddha - Art Stage Singapore, 2013
Zhang HuanBerlin Buddha, Art Stage Singapore, Singapore, 2013

Zhang Huan - Berlin Buddha - Museum of Old and New Art, 2014
Zhang HuanBerlin Buddha, Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 2014

Zhang Huan - Berlin Buddha - Museum of Old and New Art, 2014 3
Zhang HuanBerlin Buddha, Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 2014

Zhang Huan - Berlin Buddha - Museum of Old and New Art, 2014 2
Zhang HuanBerlin Buddha, Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 2014

Zhang Huan - Berlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing) 4, 2007, ink on paper, 82.5 x 102cm
Zhang HuanBerlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing) 4, 2007, ink on paper, 82.5 x 102cm

Zhang Huan - Berlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing) 5, 2007, ink on paper, 82.5 x 102cm
Zhang HuanBerlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing) 5, 2007, ink on paper, 82.5 x 102cm

Zhang Huan - Berlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing) 7, 2007, ink on paper, 82.5 x 102cm
Zhang HuanBerlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing) 7, 2007, ink on paper, 82.5 x 102cm

Zhang Huan - Berlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing) 9, 2007, ink on paper, 82.5 x 102cm
Zhang HuanBerlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing) 9, 2007, ink on paper, 82.5 x 102cm

Zhang Huan - Berlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing), 2007, ink on paper, 82.5 x 102cm
Zhang HuanBerlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing), 2007, ink on paper, 82.5 x 102cm

Zhang Huan - Berlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing), 2007, ink and soya sauce on paper, 82.5 x 102cm
Zhang HuanBerlin Buddha (Preparatory Drawing), 2007, ink and soya sauce on paper, 82.5 x 102cm


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Beautiful sculptures made entirely from soap

Beautiful sculptures made entirely from soap

Meekyoung Shin - Crouching Aphrodite, 2002
Meekyoung ShinCrouching Aphrodite, 2002

Meekyoung Shin, a South Korean sculptor, became popular for her Translation series, using soap as her medium of art. Trained in the tradition of European sculpture, her statuettes are made factoring in the Western and Eastern style of relief. Her works are usually made from palm oil, a vegetarian soap.

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Life-sized human skull made out of cocaine

Life-sized human skull made out of cocaine


DiddoEcce Animal, 2004, compression molded Cocaine (street sourced) and Gelatin, 12x18x22cm

Ecce Animal by Dutch artist Diddo is an unusual artwork, crafted with cocaine mixed with gelatin, it was fashioned in form of a human skull. The gelatin was used to hold together the sculpture. The artwork, as strange as it is, calls for a lot of questioning as to what it stands for and what exactly it means.

Before making the sculpture, Diddo tested the purity of the cocaine in a laboratory where it was determined that it was about 20 percent pure. According to Diddo, he feels it isn’t his work to talk about the dangers of using drugs but with the artwork crafted in the form of a human skull, to some a symbol of death, it clearly shows the dangerous side of it. He says the work of art brings to the fore the dynamics of human behaviour. Human beings find it difficult to live together while at the same time cannot quite live without one another. Ecce Animal symbolizes bringing together man’s animal instincts and the modern world we are in today.

Ecce Animal was not made to emphasize on the dangers involved in drug abuse or addiction but rather is about man’s nature in the present world. Man’s nature specifically in the sense that he lives in a society which constantly throws at him situations he may be unable to control, hence the use of cocaine (a dangerous substance) to sculpt the human skull. In the poem that accompanied the work of art Diddo writes, “It is frightening to look at the face of our animal side laid bare by comfortable excess, the spoils of its aggression.”

Is this unorthodox way of passing across a message one that will create a lasting impression? The work of art is definitely a brilliant one and the way and manner it was crafted is ingenious. “Ecce Animal” is a commissioned piece so details about it are not available to the public but since pictures are available on the internet, we can simply view and deduce our own interpretations and just maybe, dwell extensively on it.

Diddo - Ecce animal
DiddoEcce Animal, 2004, compression molded Cocaine (street sourced) and Gelatin, 12x18x22cm

Diddo - Ecce animal
DiddoEcce Animal, 2004, compression molded Cocaine (street sourced) and Gelatin, 12x18x22cm

Diddo - Ecce animal
DiddoEcce Animal, 2004, compression molded Cocaine (street sourced) and Gelatin, 12x18x22cm

Diddo - Ecce animal
DiddoEcce Animal, 2004, compression molded Cocaine (street sourced) and Gelatin, 12x18x22cm

Diddo - Ecce animal
DiddoEcce Animal, 2004, compression molded Cocaine (street sourced) and Gelatin, 12x18x22cm

Diddo - Ecce animal
DiddoEcce Animal, 2004, compression molded Cocaine (street sourced) and Gelatin, 12x18x22cm

Diddo - Ecce animal
DiddoEcce Animal, 2004, compression molded Cocaine (street sourced) and Gelatin, 12x18x22cm


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Colorful life-sized recreation of entire apartment

Colorful life-sized recreation of entire apartment

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, at MOCA Cleveland, 2015, Photo Jerry Birchfield 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

South Korean artist Do Ho Suh created an installation based on his New York home. It serves to highlight the permeable margins that are said to disconnect private and public in addition to the normalized concepts global identity, space and place, diasporic movement, memory, and displacement. Do Ho Su’s biography is the inspiration of the architectural settings and abstracted figures.

New York City Apartment is a piece that is cognizant of the artists individual lived experiences, significantly lamp lighting his move from South Korea to the United States, in addition to the places he has called home such as his childhood home (a traditional hanok-style Korean house), the house in Rhode Island where he once lived as a student, and his current apartment in New York City.

His work invokes transparency, gradating space and intermediate areas in Korean architecture, and has been taken various physical forms such as the recapitulations of large-scale house sculptures, identifying the ostinatos of his past and present family homes, intersected in a way that makes the interiors visible. Do’s use of monochrome polyester transparent structures are luminous, architectural, and fleeting, allowing audiences to roam through the disorienting interior passageways.

The main installation seems to represent almost any and every single bedroom apartment in New York with its one living room, bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom. Each piece of the home-like installation hanging in apparent stability, however, with the lack of foundation alerts audiences to the precarious fragility of the polyester home. Even the items featured that your mind wants you to think are hard, a toilet made of solid porcelain, a heater, a light switch embedded into a wall is truly soft and material that is hardly there- leading many viewers to question if the solid objects that these translucent representations epitomize are any less precarious than the monochrome polyester. Is home, the thing we feel is most stable, truly something forever, or something that delicately hangs in the balance and can change?

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, at MOCA Cleveland, 2015, Photo Jerry Birchfield 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 3
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 4
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 6

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 7
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 8
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 9
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, Photo Jerry Birchfield 10
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin, Photo by Brian Fitzsimmons
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin 1
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin, Photo Brian Fitzsimmons 4
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014, The Contemporary Austin, Photo Brian Fitzsimmons 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin, Photo Brian Fitzsimmons 3
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, Unit 2, Corridor and Staircase, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 10011, USA. 2011–2014 (detail), The Contemporary Austin
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase (detail), Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Staircase detail, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Staircase (detail), Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015 3
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Corridor : Ground Floor Plus Staircase, Bristol Museum and Art Gallery, 2015


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