Archive: Tate Modern
Pumpkins & Tulips – Yayoi Kusama’s most outstanding public sculptures

Pumpkins & Tulips – Yayoi Kusama’s most outstanding public sculptures

Yayoi Kusama - Pumpkin, 1994, Benesse Art Site, Naoshima, Japan
Yayoi KusamaPumpkin, 1994, Benesse Art Site, Naoshima, Japan

Celebrating her 90th birthday in 2019, Yayoi Kusama is a leading Japanese artist and legend as far as art is concerned. While she deliberately makes unique pieces that can withstand the wear and tear of the outdoors, she is renowned for reproducing her art in monumental scale when need be. Her career spans over 6 decades and during this time her works have managed to enter the collection of museums such as the New York MoMA, LACMA, Tate Modern and others.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
One of the most fun ways to experience a museum

One of the most fun ways to experience a museum

Carsten Höller - Test Site, 2007, New Museum, New York - Exhibition Experience, 2011
Carsten HöllerTest Site, 2007, New Museum, New York – Exhibition: Experience, 2011

Carsten Höller is well known for playfully including his slide installations in major museums across the world. Höller, who is formerly a scientist with a degree in agronomy, is famous for repurposing components of the real world, such as slides, for art spaces. The majority of his works feature aesthetics that are relational, meaning that the projects created are inspired by the relationship that people have with their social contexts. The end result of Höller’s incredible work is an experience that resembles part playground and part lab, which is a crowd pleaser.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Ambitious installation recreated sun inside of museum

Ambitious installation recreated sun inside of museum

Olafur Eliasson - The Weather Project, 2003, Tate Modern, London
Olafur EliassonThe Weather Project, 2003, Monofrequency lights, projection foil, haze machines, mirror foil, aluminium, and scaffolding, 26.7×22.3×155.4m, Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, London
Photo: Olafur Eliasson / Tate, London

Olafur Eliasson has created a gigantic installation which in 2003 took over all space in Tate Modern, London. The artwork, a sun rising out of a mist was bound to keep any visitor in awe. In this project named The Weather Project, the Scandinavian artist recreated the sun and the sky to occupy the Turbine Hall. The whole space was covered with a fine mist that seeps into the whole space like it was coming from the outside space. Looking ahead to see if the mist escapes into the outer space, visitors saw in place of the ceiling, a replica of the space below – like a mirror. There were 200 low-sodium mono-frequency lamps at the extreme end of the hall as well. Mono-frequency lamps are mostly used in street lights and the frequency at which they emit light is so low that any other colour besides black and yellow are invisible. These lamps therefore change the view and landscape of the environment into one with two tones.

Read more


Posted in Public Delivery | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment
Ai Weiwei explains his famous Sunflower Seeds

Ai Weiwei explains his famous Sunflower Seeds

Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds, Tate Modern, London
Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds, hand-painted porcelain, at Tate Modern, London

Insight in the background and production process of one of the most spectacular exhibitions of 2010, Sunflower Seeds by Ai Weiwei at Tate Modern. Follow Ai Weiwei to the city of Jingdezhen in northern Jiangxi, China, famed for its production of Imperial porcelain, where all of the sunflower seeds have been individually hand-sculpted and hand-painted.

Additionally, you can see Sunflower Seeds at Mary Boone Gallery right now. The exhibition opened on January 7 and is on view until February 4. Below are a few installation shots. The installation is made out of millions (five tons) of hand-painted porcelain sunflower seeds. Each actual-size seed is unique and intricately hand-formed and like those shown at Tate Modern painted in Jingdezhen.

The sunflower, following the sun, is a well-known metaphor for The People during China’s Cultural Revolution. The seeds provided nourishment at all levels of society, and the ubiquitous discarded husks provided evidence of an individual’s existence. Ai Weiwei created a deceptively unified field with a large number of individual seeds. Sunflower Seeds comments on social, political and economical issues relevant to contemporary China such as the role of the individual in relationship to the collective.

Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds, Tate Modern, London
Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds, hand-painted porcelain, at Tate Modern, London, photo by Mike Kemp, In Pictures, Corbis

Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds, Tate Modern, London
Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds, hand-painted porcelain, at Tate Modern, London

Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds, Tate Modern
Ai Weiwei, Sunflower Seeds, hand-painted porcelain, at Tate Modern, London

Read more


Posted in Others | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments
Want inspiration in your inbox?
Ok
close-link
Public Delivery

Public Delivery