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The legendary Electronic Superhighway – Nam June Paik

The legendary Electronic Superhighway – Nam June Paik

Nam June Paik - Electronic Superhighway- Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii, 1995 at the Smithsonian American Art Museum
Nam June Paik – Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii, 1995, fifty-one channel video installation (including one closed-circuit television feed), custom electronics, neon lighting, steel and wood; color, sound, approx. 15 x 40 x 4 ft., at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Understanding a diverse nation through technology

Electronic Superhighway is one of the most noted works of Korean Nam June Paik artist. It illustrates how he interpreted a diverse nation through media technology. The Electronic Superhighway is a large installation, constructed with 336 televisions, 50 DVD players, 3750 feet of cable, and 575 feet of multicolored neon tubing.

Electronic Superhighway creates an overwhelming impact on visitors when they first see it. The wave of audio and visual media along with flashing neon lights make it awe-inspiring. It becomes challenging to concentrate on any state that the neon lights border or the video dialogues that play for each state.

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What does a museum look like behind the scenes?

What does a museum look like behind the scenes?

Klaus Pichler - Shark at the Museum of Natural History, Vienna, 2010, from Skeletons in the Closet
Klaus Pichler – Shark at the Museum of Natural History, Vienna, 2010, from Skeletons in the Closet

“What does a museum look like behind the scenes?” was the question Austrian photographer Klaus Pichler found himself asking after seeing the unusual sight of museum exhibits in storage.

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This tank is not a real tank

This tank is not a real tank

Andreas Angelidakis - Polemos, 2017, documenta 14, Fridericianum Museum, Photo Nils Klinger
Andreas AngelidakisPolemos, 2017, Foam and vinyl seating modules, Ten blocks: 50 × 70 × 70 cm, 110 blocks: 50 × 70 × 140 cm, 16 blocks: 50 cm × 70 cm diameter, documenta 14, Fridericianum, Kassel, Germany
Photo: Nils Klinger

Named for the Greek spirit of war and battle, Polemos is comprised of 136 foam blocks covered in various camouflage fabrics. Together the blocks of foam and vinyl seating modules create a massive tank, which can be disassembled and reassembled in other formations-including seating for visitors to the Fridericianum Museum (where the piece was exhibited during documenta 14). Clearly, a comment on the uncertain nature of war, Polemos is the result of Andreas Angelidakis multidisciplinary practice in art and architecture.

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This North Korean spectacle involves 100,000 participants

This North Korean spectacle involves 100,000 participants

Noh Suntag - Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005 1
Noh Suntag Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005

Noh Suntag has made it his mission to provide the world glimpses of social, historical and political developments of North Korea, which many people do not get to see. Noh produces photographs that record real-life situations that are directly linked to the division of Korea. Some of his works were in particular created to show how deeply the division between the North and South has permeated the daily lives of the Korean citizenry, as well as how the division has distorted the proper functioning of society.

North Korea is a particular subject that is constant in Noh’s themes. North Korea’s obsession with image and the way the country represents itself to the rest of the world by exaggerated manipulation of its images led to Noh’s fascination; in his photo series titled North Korea, Suntag’s photos observe conflict in the contemporary society in Korea.

The conflicts date all the way back to 1948, and they led to the division of Korea into two separate states. Noh perceives the two ideologies of both the north and the south as too extreme, in a manner that has led to a constant state of emergency in Korea. Noh shows this dichotomy through his photographs, highlighting the dictatorship in North Korea, the increased capitalism that has been experienced in South Korea, the high military presence in both countries, and the circumstances both subtle and violent that affect the daily lives of the people living there.

His photographs in North Korea also analyses the social and political ambivalence of the two countries. In this case, the two nations survive in ideological extremities with each other, despite sharing many social and cultural traditions. The presence of political disparities between the two countries, whereby one is an communist state while the other is a capitalist is also highlighted significantly in the North Korea series. Noh also visited the famous Arirang Mass Games in the capital Pyongyang, a national spectacle that involves up to 100,000 participants.

For this work, Noh employed his experience as a remarkable photojournalist, his education in political studies and his creativity to capture the quiet scenes that both reveal the truth and dispel myths about the partition between North Korea and South Korea that exists to this day.

Noh’s views in his pieces including Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005 and the State of Emergency, 2000–07 are unbiased. His analytical position recognizes the lasting political division and polarization of both the government and society. He expertly manages to tie the two nations together while exposing the underlying humanity that encompasses normal life in both the north and south.

Noh Suntag - Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005
Noh Suntag Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005

Noh Suntag - Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005
Noh Suntag Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005

Noh Suntag - Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005
Noh Suntag Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005

Noh Suntag - Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005
Noh Suntag Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005

Noh Suntag - Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005
Noh Suntag Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005

Noh Suntag - Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005
Noh Suntag Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005

Noh Suntag - Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005
Noh Suntag Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005

Noh Suntag - Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005
Noh Suntag Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005

Noh Suntag - Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005
Noh Suntag Red House I. North Korea in North Korea, 2005

Noh Suntag - Red House II. Give and Take, 2005
Noh Suntag Red House II. Give and Take, 2005


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Devastatingly real – Monsoon photos from Asia

Devastatingly real – Monsoon photos from Asia

Steve McCurry - Monsoon 2
Steve McCurry

Steve McCurry is no stranger to success having built a name for himself as one of the world’s most respected photographers. He has won numerous international awards as well as acclaim for his consistent and impactful repertoire and has sold books in the millions across the world. In particular, some of his most talked about works are his Monsoon photographs.

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Watch the tremendous effect one book can have

Watch the tremendous effect one book can have

Jorge Mendez Blake - The Castle, 2007, Bricks, edition of Franz Kafka’s 'The Castle', 2300 x 1750 x 400 cm
Jorge Méndez BlakeThe Castle, 2007, Bricks, edition of Franz Kafka’s 'The Castle', 2300 x 1750 x 400 cm

The Castle by Mexican artist Jorge Méndez Blake, a mixed media conceptual artist, debuted in 2007. It featured a brick wall that was created by carefully arranging and stacking bricks over each other. The wall was made without mortar, and in the middle, a version of Franz Kafka’s The Castle rested crushed by the extreme pressure of the bricks. Therefore, the entire length and width of the wall balanced precariously on the single hardcover book.

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See how these hypnotic installations transform rooms

See how these hypnotic installations transform rooms

Peter Kogler - Dimensions, 2011
Peter KoglerDimensions, 2011

Peter Kogler is a renowned artist from Austria that currently works and lives in Vienna. Kogler is best known for his different psychedelic room installations. Through his paintwork and his intricate projections, he transforms ordinary looking rooms and spaces such as lobbies, galleries, and transit centers by making them look twisted, warped or distorted, which in turn has a psychedelic effect for the public.

Kogler’s room installations explore vital concepts in his art such as modularity and repetition. The rooms alter one’s perception of architecture, which serves as the primary medium for his art. Aside from his dizzying rooms, Kogler is also an important performance, film and video artist as well as a sculptor.

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