Archive: installation art
Anish Kapoor’s whirlpool – Everything you need to know

Anish Kapoor’s whirlpool – Everything you need to know

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, Courtesy Kapoor Studio e Kamel Mennour 1, photo Silvia Neri
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, 2015
Photo: Silvia Neri

Introduction

This installation by Anish Kapoor is a depiction of the fluidity and motion of water as a liquid mass and the void into which it descends. Descension is an impressive sculpture that depicts water’s continuous swirling motion as it rushes down an 8m (26-ft) diameter vortex representing a powerful physical form that is sucked into the earth. This art piece induces a mesmerized feeling in the audience when viewing the perpetual black water being pulled down into an unknown interior. Descension also induces a visceral feeling like the center is an abyss that seems bottomless and which sucks the water that spins into a vortex as it descends into this abyss. As such, the installation conveys different meanings and feelings based on the viewer’s own experiences. For instance, while some may view it as a transience of humanity’s existence, to others, it looks like a portal into a different world or even, a window into the past or future.

‘Decension’ at Château de Versailles, France, 2015

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, photo Tadzio
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, 2015
Photo: Tadzio

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, Versailles, 2015, © ADAGP Anish Kapoor, photo Fabrice Seixas
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, 2015
© ADAGP Anish Kapoor, photo Fabrice Seixas

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, Versailles, 2015
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, 2015

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, Courtesy Kapoor Studio e Kamel Mennour 1, photo Silvia Neri
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, 2015
Photo: Silvia Neri

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, photo Tadzio
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Château de Versailles, 2015
Photo: Tadzio

The whirlpool & politics

According to Kapoor, the pool is also a representation of the current state of affairs in America regarding politics for which he is vocal about. Indeed, the artist has since formed a coalition of over 200 creatives to engage in art exhibitions aimed at confronting right-wing populism. Dubbed ‘Hands off Our Revolution,’ the coalition will use contemporary art forms in its exhibitions.

‘Decension’ at Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York, 2017

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 1, New York, 2017, photo James Ewing, Public Art Fund, NY
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 1, New York, 2017
Photo: James Ewing, Public Art Fund, NY

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 1, New York, 2017, photo James Ewing, Public Art Fund, NY
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 1, New York, 2017
Photo: James Ewing, Public Art Fund, NY

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 1, New York, 2017, photo James Ewing, Public Art Fund, NY
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 1, New York, 2017
Photo: James Ewing, Public Art Fund, NY

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 1, New York, 2017, photo James Ewing, Public Art Fund, NY
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 1, New York, 2017
Photo: James Ewing, Public Art Fund, NY

How does it work?

The work was created using pipes and was powered by a recirculating discharge pump. The pull of the water descending into unknowable depths attracts the audience and activates their perceptions as they try to guess what’s beyond the vortex that pulls the water in such a spinning vortex fashion. The installation was surrounded by a railing to enable viewers to peer into the depths of the whirlpool. Like in all his works, Anish Kapoor makes use of ordinary materials and elements to create art that induces a strong feeling in viewers. In this case, he used water and artificial black dye to create the effect of swirling motion and a seemingly bottomless pool into which the water spins. Later, he did away with black dye to leave the water in its natural color as a resemblance to the water in the East River of Brooklyn, New York.

Destruction of Anish Kapoor's Descension, 2014. In the foreground installation for soil drainage, Château de Versailles, photo T. Lefebvre
Destruction of Anish Kapoor’s Descension, 2014. In the foreground installation for soil drainage, Château de Versailles
Photo: T. Lefebvre

‘Decension’ at Galleria Continua, San Gimignano, Italy, 2015

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Galleria Continua, San Gimignano, Italy, 2015
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Galleria Continua, San Gimignano, Italy, 2015

Anish Kapoor - Descension, 2014, Galleria Continua, San Gimignano, Italy, 2015
Anish Kapoor – Descension, 2014, Galleria Continua, San Gimignano, Italy, 2015

About Anish Kapoor

Anish Kapoor was born in 1954 in India’s Mumbai area and moved to London in the early 1970s where he attended art school and continues to live and create inventive art. He created artworks using materials such as stone, stainless steel, resin, raw pigment, wax and synthetic polymer among others while also displaying a healthy obsession with water as a sculptural potential as seen in Descension.

Portrait of Anish Kapoor in front of Descension, 2014, photo Ela Bialkowska
Portrait of Anish Kapoor in front of Descension, 2014
Photo: Ela Bialkowska

Video: Anish Kapoor talks about ‘Descension’

3min 13sec

Related works


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Mesmerizing glitter artwork shimmers in downtown LA

Mesmerizing glitter artwork shimmers in downtown LA

Poetic Kinetics – Liquid Shard, Pershing Square, Los Angeles, 2016
Poetic Kinetics – Liquid Shard, 15000 square feet of silver streamers, at Pershing Square, Los Angeles, 2016

Introduction

If you keep a tab on what’s happening in the public display arts, the odds are that you came across the Liquid Shard. It was a public art installation on display in Pershing Square in LA between July 28 and August 11, 2016. Thanks to its odd size, unique design, and pure ingenuity of the creators, the Liquid Shard was all the rage, wafting several posts on social media, and made headlines in the US and all over the world.

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Please step on this artwork – LikeArchitects

Please step on this artwork – LikeArchitects

likearchitects - lisbon - jen lewin - the pool
LIKEarchitects with Jen Lewin’s installation The Pool, Colombo Shopping Mall, Lisbon, Portugal, 2014

LIKEarchitects, a Porto-based architecture studio constructed the temporary exhibition at Colombo Shopping Mall in Lisbon, Portugal that would hold Jen Lewin’s highly interactive luminous installation titled ‘The Pool’.

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Our 2018 Art Basel top 10

Our 2018 Art Basel top 10

Rirkrit Tiravanija - untitled 2015 (bangkok boogie woogie, no. 1), 2015, Art Basel Unlimited 2018
Rirkrit TiravanijaUntitled, 2015 (bangkok boogie woogie, no. 1), 2015, Art Basel Unlimited 2018
Video/Film, Bronze tires, copper sheets, video, color, sound
Dimensions variable
Photo: Public Delivery

Rirkrit TiravanijaUntitled, 2015 (bangkok boogie woogie, no. 1), 2015

“In 2010, Bangkok erupted in violence with protesters from both the Left and Right, battling the military in the streets. The main weapon on both sides was the tire, both as a barricade and as improvised Molotov cocktail, rolled instead of thrown. In 2015, Rirkrit Tiravanija created an installation, untitled 2015 (bangkok boogie woogie, no. 1), sourced from this particularly vernacular form of action, straight from the streets of his hometown. In what became the very last action at the old Gavin Brown’s enterprise space on Greenwich St. in New York before it was demolished, Tiravanija cast rubber tires into bronze doppelgängers, and rolled them flaming through the gallery filled with petroleum fuel; all of this was filmed, edited, and used as the backdrop for the installation. The mirrored copper floor reflects the rolling burning movement, while the metal tires produce a clanging soundtrack, conjuring a feeling of violent assault within the gallery space. Part political reflection, and part kinetic experiment, untitled 2015 (bangkok boogie woogie, no. 1) passes on messages from the protesters, and also from other brothers-in-arms: Fischli & Weiss, Allan Kaprow, and Jean Tinguely.”
Jetzer, Gianni (2018) retrieved from artbasel.com/artworks

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Tomás Saraceno created this seemingly impossible installation

Tomás Saraceno created this seemingly impossible installation

Tomás Saraceno - In Orbit, 2013. Installation view, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, K21 Ständehaus, Düsseldorf
Tomás SaracenoIn Orbit, 2013, permanent installation at Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, K21 Ständehaus, Düsseldorf

Introduction

A massive installation by Tomás Saraceno titled In Orbit has to be one of the artist’s most notable and successful installations. At a height of more than 20 meters, Saraceno suspended a mesh construction within which audiences could move weightlessly on the net. The net construction, which was accessible on 3 levels, was designed to resemble a cloud setting or landscape.

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Stunning moon replica created from detailed NASA imagery

Stunning moon replica created from detailed NASA imagery

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, photo from inside the Moon

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter

About the ‘Museum of the Moon’

Bristol native and artist Luke Jerram has an unerring knack for creating arresting public art projects. One of his recent works is Museum of the Moon, a model of the moon, that was singlehandedly created by Jerram. It is so realistic in its detailing and features such that each centimeter of the spherical structure represents 5km of the moon’s surface. The spherical surface is covered with accurate pictures of the moon and the inside is lit internally to make it as similar looking to the actual moon as possible.

The moon, which is 7-meter diameters, was designed and intended to be a touring art piece. The light included within the gigantic sphere helps to make the imagery more visible. To ensure that the renderings were as realistic as possible, Jerram had to make use of official images that Nasa had taken before using bright color lights to backlight the inside of the sculpture.

How did Jerram come up with the idea for the moon?

Jerram came up with the idea of the piece because of the moon’s universal appeal and influence; the moon looks the same and it has the same effect regardless of where in the world it can be seen. The moon has always served the role of a cultural mirror that reflects people’s traditions, cultures, and beliefs. As such, the moon can be classified as a god that has inspired the development of numerous art forms including music, poetry, language and art. The Museum of the Moon was therefore created as an homage to the natural wonder.

Impact

Because people have different beliefs about the moon and its power, Jerram’s sculpture was designed to be showcased in different parts of the world. This way, the moon will provoke different sensations, thoughts, and feelings depending on where in the world it is being observed. The purpose was to create something that is both attractive and a piece that can also invite questions about life in general. In the end, the hope is that audiences will be moved to reconnect with the ubiquitous moon as they explore the impact of the moon on various cultures and societies.

Installation photos

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon at Liverpool Cathedral, 2018
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Liverpool Cathedral, 2018

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 4
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017
Photo: Neil James Brain

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 2
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 3
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - Lieux Publics, Cité des arts de la rue, Marseille, Photo Gregoire Edouard
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Lieux Publics, Cité des arts de la rue, Marseille, 2016
Photo: Gregoire Edouard

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon at Liverpool Cathedral, 2018
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Liverpool Cathedral, 2018

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Light Night 2017, Leeds Dock, Leeds, UK
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Light Night 2017, Leeds Dock, Leeds, UK

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon at Tec Art Rotterdam, 2017
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Tec Art Rotterdam, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon at Tec Art Rotterdam, 2017 1
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Tec Art Rotterdam, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, balloon at Les Tombées de la Nuit, Saint-Georges Swimming Pool in Rennes, France
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Les Tombées de la Nuit, Saint-Georges Swimming Pool in Rennes, France

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, balloon at Les Tombées de la Nuit, Saint-Georges Swimming Pool in Rennes, France
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Les Tombées de la Nuit, Saint-Georges Swimming Pool in Rennes, France

Luke Jerram - Rendering of Museum of the Moon - Timber Festival -- 5 : 6 : 7 July 2019
Luke Jerram – Rendering of Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Timber Festival, Britain’s first forest festival

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, balloon, 7m in diameter, Ashton Park School, Bristol, UK, 2018
Luke Jerram – Rendering of Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, Ashton Park School, Bristol, UK, 2018

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - St. Thomas’ Church, Kendal, UK, 2016 2
Luke Jerram – Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, St. Thomas’ Church, Kendal, UK, 2016

Behind the scenes photos

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, installation of the moon
Installation of Museum of the Moon

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, photo from inside the Moon
Photo of Luke Jerram inside of Museum of the Moon

Videos

Luke Jerram speaks about the Museum of the Moon

Museum of the Moon at St. Thomas’ Church, Kendal, UK, 2016

Museum of the Moon at Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral


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Entire apartment recreated – Massive installation by Do Ho Suh

Entire apartment recreated – Massive installation by Do Ho Suh

Do Ho Suh - New York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, at MOCA Cleveland, 2015, Photo Jerry Birchfield 2
Do Ho SuhNew York City Apartment, Apartment A, 348 West 22nd Street, New York, NY 10011, USA, MOCA Cleveland, 2015
Photo: Jerry Birchfield

South Korean artist Do Ho Suh created an installation based on his New York home. It serves to highlight the permeable margins that are said to disconnect private and public in addition to the normalized concepts global identity, space and place, diasporic movement, memory, and displacement. Do Ho Su’s biography is the inspiration of the architectural settings and abstracted figures.

New York City Apartment is a piece that is cognizant of the artists individual lived experiences, significantly lamp lighting his move from South Korea to the United States, in addition to the places he has called home such as his childhood home (a traditional hanok-style Korean house), the house in Rhode Island where he once lived as a student, and his current apartment in New York City.

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