Archive: public art
Our top 10: Massive organic sculptures by Jaehyo Lee (이재효)

Our top 10: Massive organic sculptures by Jaehyo Lee (이재효)

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=193061, 1993, stones
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=193061, 1993, stones

Biography

Jaehyo Lee (b. 1965, Hapchen, South Korea) graduated in 1992 with a BFA from the Hong-Ik University in Seoul. Combining distinct traces of Land Art, Arte Povera and Minimalism Lee´s works cast a questioning eye over the roots of form, its function and its role within the natural world.

Lee´s works willfully play with the oft-contested boundaries between modern art and design, referencing the idealist´s cubes, cylinders and cones as perversions of the chaise longue, the coffee table, the lampshade, and even the humble doughnut. Revealing a subtly humorous and unsentimental attitude to nature, what unites these works is a belief that the beauty of art is a product of the labor from whence it comes, whether this be the meticulous carving of larch trunks into the form of a perfect sphere or, equally, the precise bending and sanding of thousands of nails hammered one after another into a hunk of cut lumber.

Artist’s Statement
“Until recently, my work has been about combining wood with nails or steel bars and integrating them into geometrical shapes such as spheres, hemispheres, or cylinders. Whenever I did this, one of my problems was to keep the nails and bolts out of sight. Now, on the contrary, I put an emphasis on the nails themselves. I drive countless nails into wood, bend them, grind them, and make them protrude. I then burn the wood, blackening its growth ring records and its natural color. The glittering metallic nails on the black charcoal become ever more conspicuous, and through this process, I draw a picture on wood using nails. Those who make a hard living may be the ones who make this world a beautiful place. I certainly do not have the power to make it beautiful. I just hope to reveal the beauty in what is usually seen but not noticed. It may be a rusty bent nail. If you take a close look at it, however, you’ll find out how beautiful it can be.”
-Jaehyo Lee

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - Lotus, 2013, Wood (Korean Big Cone Pine), 216 in; 548.6 cm
Jaehyo LeeLotus, 2013, Wood (Korean Big Cone Pine), 216 in; 548.6 cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=102101, 2002, 350x350x350cm, wood
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=102101, 2002, Wood, 350x350x350cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=107041, 520 x 520 x 520 cm, wood, Korean Eye, Saatchi, 2012
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=107041, 2002, Wood, 520 x 520 x 520 cm, installed at the exhibition Korean Eye, Saatchi Gallery, London, 2012

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=114047, 2014, 700x700x700cm, wood
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=114047, 2014, Wood, 700x700x700cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=191111, 1991, 300x300x350cm, stone
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=191111, 1991, Stone, 300x300x350cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=197073, 1997, 220x220x350cm, stone
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=197073, 1997, Stone, 220x220x350cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=194051, 1994, 150x150x150cm, grass
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=194051, 1994, Grass, 150x150x150cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=115075, 2015, 560x130x360cm, wood
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=115075, 2015, Wood, 560x130x360cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=1110112, 2011, size variable, snow
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=1110112, 2011, Snow, size variable


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When giant green tentacles burst out of buildings ..

When giant green tentacles burst out of buildings ..

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks tentacle, troublin in dublin
Filthy LukerArt Attacks

Luke Egan otherwise known as Filthy Luker is a mixed media artist from Bristol. He is know for creating large inflatable sculptures, temporarily installed in various places around the planet.

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks at Sand Safari, Gold Coast, Australia

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks tentacle 2

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks tentacle 3

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks tentacle 5

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks tentacle 4

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks tentacle 6

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks tentacle, Monterey Bay Aquarium, 2014

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks, 2017 1

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks, brush

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks, International Surveillance

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks 1

Filthy Luker - Art Attacks


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Homelessness and the sense of having a home

Homelessness and the sense of having a home

I-Hsuen Chen – Still Life Analysis II - The Island 1
I-Hsuen ChenStill Life Analysis II – The Island, Taipei, Taiwan

I-Hsuen Chen is a photographer, artist, and filmmaker that was born and raised in Taipei, Taiwan but is now based in Brooklyn, New York. As a photographer, Chen is well known for surveying and photographing foreign objects such as garbage as the main subjects of his photographs. In Still Life Analysis II: The Island, I-Hsuen Chen continues his survey of garbage and unfamiliar objects, which started in his first exhibition titled The Still Life Analysis. In both series, Chen concentrates on collections of typical household objects that a homeless person would have beneath the Civic Boulevard.

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Andy Warhol’s scandalous mural was destroyed within days

Andy Warhol’s scandalous mural was destroyed within days

Andy Warhol - Thirteen Most Wanted Men No. 11, John Joseph H., Jr., 1964, Photo Axel Schneider
Thirteen Most Wanted Men No. 11, John Joseph H., Jr., 1964
Photo: Axel Schneider

Pop provocateur Andy Warhol was never a stranger to controversy. In 1964, as part of a series of commissions for the New York State Pavilion, Warhol was commissioned to work on an installation that would be displayed on the face of the pavilion, which was to serve as one of the main venues of the fair.

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People love this giant outdoor sculpture that spits out water

People love this giant outdoor sculpture that spits out water

Jaume Plensa - Crown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA
Jaume PlensaCrown Fountain, 2004, Glass, stainless steel, LED screens, light, wood, black granite and water, 16 m, Millennium Park, Chicago, Illinois, USA

Within Chicago’s Millennium Park stands an interactive piece of art that the public never seems to have enough of. Designed by Jaume Plensa, a Catalan artist, the fountain is an illustration of how creativity and technology can mingle to form an enchanting piece of work. The work, which was unveiled in July 2004, was executed by Krueck and Sexton Architects and in it they use black granite which gives the illusion of a pool. The pool on which visitors stand on, is an area of space that separates two towers made from glass. Each one of the towers is 50 feet tall and LEDs are used on their surfaces to display inward faces developed by digital videography.

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Striking installation comments on climate change

Striking installation comments on climate change

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

As you walk through Paris and especially in the Montsouris Park, one cannot help but notice the blue busts that appear to be rising from under the surface of the water. This art work is known as ‘Where the Tides Ebb and Flow’ created by Pedro Marzorati, an Argentinian artist. This is a commentary on how the water levels in the earth’s sea bodies continue to rise as a result of climate change. The level of submersion of the various sculptures is an indication of the level of impact that global warming is having in different parts of the world. The sequence in which the sculptures are arranged indicates that as time goes by, the human forms will be completely below the water. The use of blue for the sculptures is deliberate and so is the number of sculptures used. The work shows that poetic activism can be just as effective if not more powerful than verbal advocacy.

The world today faces many challenges one of which is climate change as a result of human activity. Is there something that can be done to protect the environment from self-destruction? The future of the continent depends on the actions of its inhabitants but a visual that can be seen all the time communicates this message better. For Pedro, a controversial installation is the only way in which this message of climate disturbances can be addressed.

Pedro Marzorati in many instances uses ordinary objects to interpret various world events. In a way, his works appeal to the subconscious and subsequently leave the audience in deep thought about problems facing humanity. By creating concern for the universe, the artist sends out warnings about what would happen if destructive activities are not stopped. To use a statue to demonstrate human destruction is the closest form of personal intervention and many artists are taking up this technique. It might not be possible to project accurately the stages of destruction that adverse global warming is going to have but the statues will continue to give a warning even to future generations.

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris
Photo: Reuters/Christian Hartmann

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris
Photo: AP/Francois Mori

Pedro Marzorati – Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
Pedro MarzoratiWhere the Tides Ebb and Flow, Montsouris Park, Paris

Video


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What is the mystery behind these decapitated Lenin statues?

What is the mystery behind these decapitated Lenin statues?

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Krivyi Rih, 8 june 2016
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Krivyi Rih, 8 June 2016

Sculptures of social influencers help the citizens of a country to stay connected to their history. While it is important for both good and bad events to be documented in history, some monuments suffer outright rejection. This is the case as it is in Ukraine today where there seems to be waging war against Soviet symbols. Niels Ackermann and Sebastien Gobert have turned their artistic lenses on Lenin, the leader of Russia in 1917. Contrary to other photographers who focus on the aftermath of war, these two are interested in the story behind the war. The journey began in 2013, after the conflict of Maidan which saw the toppling over and smashing of the city’s last Lenin statue.

Niels Ackermann takes the pictures and his colleague Sebastien Gobert tells the stories. Their quest to preserve history has taken them on a tour of western Ukraine, looking for the story behind fallen Lenins under the project banner “Lost in Decommunization”. In the same way that the rise of Lenin was documented, Niels Ackermann and Sebastien Gobert seek to document his fate as he goes down. Once held in high esteem, this project will trace his path from glory to an unlikely trophy.

To think of the 5000 statues of Lenin in Ukraine, way above 2000 in Russia and then imagine that more than half that number would disappear with independence is frightening for future generations who have no visuals with which to connect history. It is estimated that the civil unrest that began in 2013 took down a further 1200. In an effort to forget this part of their past, Ukraine banned everything that is connected to Russia; from flags, street names, road signs, and the massive statues. The destruction of statues dubbed “Lenin-fall” is symbolic to their disconnection from the past. While there might be concrete justification for this, the process is quite dysfunctional.

In their journey of looking for Lenin, Niels Ackermann and Sebastien Gobert have had to traverse through Ukraine in search of the fallen sculptures. They find some in museums, gardens, kitchens and private collections but each discovery is unique. Quite fascinating is the reaction they get from Ukrainians; for some, it is indifference but many others want the Soviet Legacy gone for good. If for nothing else, the work they do is an integrated piece of art that combines investigation, discovery, stories, and pictures. For future generations, these and such works will form the basis for a fascinating debate about the journey they are taking as a nation.

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Odessa, November 2015
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Artist Alexander Milov transformed this Lenin statue into Darth Vader outside an Odessa factory. Odessa, 21 november 2015.

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Dnipropetrovsk, November 2015
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Dnipropetrovsk, November 2015
The head of Dnipropetrovsk’s Lenin was given to the city’s National Historical Museum. It remains in storage as the institution does not currently have the resources to exhibit it. Dnipropetrovsk (now Dnipro). November 13, 2015

's head back together again by Yevgenia Belorusets, Pinchuk Art Centre, Kiev, February 2016
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – This nose belonged to a 28-foot-tall statue of Lenin, once the largest in Ukraine. It is now on display at the Pinchuk Art Centre in Kiev as part of Yevgenia Belorusets’s installation “Let’s Put Lenin’s Head Back Together.” Kyiv, 5 february 2016.

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Kharkiv
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Kharkiv

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Kharkiv
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Kharkiv

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Kharkiv
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Kharkiv
A private collector has assembled a large collection of Soviet-era monuments, including dozens of Lenin statues. He stores them in his warehouse alongside materials for his glass business. Kharkiv. February 2, 2016

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Kharkiv
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Kharkiv

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Kharkiv
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Kharkiv

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Korzhi, 2016
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – The village of Korzhi is attempting to sell its statue for $15,000 to fund repairs to the local kindergarten and school. The price is high, and they have had no offers. The local mechanic in charge of the sale expects he will eventually have to trade it for scrap metal for less than $3,000. June 3, 2016

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Kramatorsk
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Kramatorsk

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Kramatorsk
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Kramatorsk

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Kremenchuk, March 30, 2016
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Kremenchuk, March 30, 2016

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Museum of Soviet Occupation, Kiev, 12 sept 2015
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Museum of Soviet Occupation, Kiev, 12 sept 2015

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - National Art Museum of Ukraine, Kiev, February 2016
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – National Art Museum of Ukraine, Kiev, February 2016

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Novobohdanivka. September 30, 2016
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Novobohdanivka, September 30, 2016

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Shabo, Odessa region. November 21, 2015
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – A decapitated Lenin statue in Chabo. Chabo, Odessa region, 21 nov 2015

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Slavyansk
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Lenin monument in a municipal storage. Slavyansk, eastern Ukraine. 15 Sept 2015.

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Teplivka. July 26, 2016
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Teplivka. July 26, 2016

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - V.I. Lenin Nuclear Power Station in Chernobyl, 2016
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – V.I. Lenin Nuclear Power Station in Chernobyl, 2016
This Lenin head is more than two meters tall and previously stood on the site of the V.I. Lenin Nuclear Power Station in Chernobyl. It is now stored in a room used by the facility cleaning staff. Despite the authorities claims of contamination, no significant levels of radiation were found. October 6, 2016

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Zaporizhia, March 2016
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Zaporizhia, March 2016

Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert - Looking for Lenin - Zhytomyr
Niels Ackermann & Sebastien Gobert – Zhytomyr


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