Archive: sculpture
Giant middle finger in front of Italian Stock Exchange

Giant middle finger in front of Italian Stock Exchange

Maurizio Cattelan - L.O.V.E., 2010, White Carrara Marble, roman travertine, 1100 x 470 x 470 cm (36.1 x 15.5 x 15.5 feet), Piazza Affari Milano, Italy 1
Maurizio Cattelan – L.O.V.E., 2010, white Carrara Marble, roman travertine, 1100 x 470 x 470 cm (36.1 x 15.5 x 15.5 feet), Piazza Affari Milano, Italy

“Officially its name is L.O.V.E. – so it stands for love – but everyone can read between the lines and take away the message they see for themselves.”

– Maurizio Cattelan

Introduction

If you stroll into Milan’s Piazza degli Affari, you are bound to feast your eyes on a shocking sight: A 4 to 5 meters high marble sculpture of a veiny hand giving its beholders the middle finger. The middle finger is placed on a 7 m base. The display of the fascist salute has a twist though, all the other fingers have been chopped off to leave the middle finger, considered an obscene offensive gesture. The sculpture by Maurizio Cattelan is right in front of the fascist-styled Palazzo Mezzanotte, the Italian stock exchange building. To many people, it seems to flip it off.

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Leading Thai artist builds sculpture of a ghost

Leading Thai artist builds sculpture of a ghost

Apichatpong Weerasethakul – Importance of Telepathy, 2012, documenta 12, Kassel, Germany, photo Latitudes (flickr)
Apichatpong Weerasethakul – Importance of Telepathy, 2012 at documenta 12, Kassel, Germany
Photo: Latitudes

Introduction

There’s no tinge of doubt that Apichatpong Weerasethakul is one of the most prolific contemporary Thai artists of our time. He’s the main feature in Tokyo’s boutique art gallery, the SCAI the Bathhouse. Apichatpong’s very popular works like Blissfully Yours (2002), Tropical Malady (2003), Power Boy (2009), Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2009), the Fireworks (2015), and The Serenity of Madness (2016) catapulted him into limelight in the global art stage.

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Ai Weiwei uses clever wordplay to speak about censorship

Ai Weiwei uses clever wordplay to speak about censorship

Ai Weiwei – He Xie (crabs), 3200 porcelain crabs, Royal Academy of Arts in London
Ai Weiwei – He Xie (crabs), 3200 porcelain crabs, Royal Academy of Arts in London

The lead up to He Xie (Crabs) – 河蟹

Artist Ai Weiwei, it seems, is always surrounded by controversy whether it is in relation to his visual masterpieces or his activism. Mr. Ai’s run-ins with the Chinese government have continued to border on dangerous but the revered artist is always willing to include these elements in his performance art. In 2010, Ai ran into the Chinese police in an unfortunate encounter whereby the local government tore down a large new studio that Ai had built in Shanghai as a result of ‘code violations’.

Before the studio was demolished, Ai hosted a dinner at the Shanghai studio, which he was barred by the government from attending, as a satirical nod to the studio’s planned destruction by the administration. The dinner was characterized by one of Ai’s most talked about installations- He Xie (crabs).

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Yinka Shonibare spent months of research for this sculpture

Yinka Shonibare spent months of research for this sculpture

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary, photo Stephen White 5

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary, photo Stephen White 5
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Leading UK contemporary artist Yinka Shonibare is an Honored Member of the Order of the British Empire, which is why the moniker MBE has become integral to his title. As one of the most revered and well-recognized contemporary artists in the world today, the name Yinka is synonymous with historical allusions.

Yinka’s amalgamations of noteworthy moments in international and artistic histories imitate his own hybrid Nigerian and British identity. His wax fabrics, which have a complex yet sophisticated pedigree have truly become is signature as is evidenced by the artist’s love for exquisite period costumes, and headless mannequins that mimic classic scenes from world history.

The End of the Empire

Yinka created The End of the Empire to commemorate the centenary celebrations for World War One in England. Margate’s Turner Contemporary, the premier gallery in the town commissioned the piece from Shonibare to comment on the balance of power in Somme 1916 that saw almost one million combatants dead or wounded in the World War offensive.

The End of Empire was created using Dutch wax fabrics that were historically inspired by Indonesian batiks. Oddly, these wax fabrics are today part of African authenticity and it is no wonder that Yinka has opted to feature them heavily in his creations. The End of the Empire featured two Victorian male figures that were both dressed in Victorian costumes fashioned from African textiles. Both the Victorian men had globe heads to represent the opposing sides of World War 1. The alliance by the French and British, as well as that, is the Austro-Hungarians and the Germans are what primarily led to the battle of Somme and this was aptly represented by the slow-moving see-saw that had both foes sitting on each end.

To create the piece, Shonibare had to immerse himself in months of extensive reading and research to be able to capture the spirit of imperialism, as well as colonization. This understanding of what occurred in history is what helped the artist to design an installation that could demonstrate the effects of the war in the hopes that people would finally reconcile or finally come to terms with an aspect of history that is only ever told in today’s classrooms. Offering a metaphor of dialogue, conflict, and balance, the End of Empire was designed to finally force a resolution between the two opposing forces of the World Wars.

In part owing to his continued experimentation with varying forms of media, Shonibare’s art, even the End of an Empire challenges simple categorization, which is probably why Yinka is so critically acclaimed.

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare portrait
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Video of ‘End of Empire’

Video interview with Yinka Shonibare MBE


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Large bright floating star blazes in white light

Large bright floating star blazes in white light

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Installed in Penang, Malaysia, Star was a large-scale light sculpture in the shape of a star by artist and architect Jun Ong.

The star is set at the core of an unfinished concrete building and spans all the five floors from the ground to the roof. It forms a 12-sided polygon also called a dodecahedron in 3D, which is visible from several kilometres away. The light installation blazes in white light encompassing the whole building but seems like a bright floating star when seen from far.

Star is made from over 500 meters of steel cables and LED light strips. The wires are attached to different surfaces; the ground, cantilever beams, slabs, and adjacent building. When lit and seen from a distance, the light beams look seamless. At a closer rance, it seems as though they penetrate the floors uninterrupted.

The idea of an abstract light installation was inspired by a ‘glitch’ which are the visible arcs of light that form when an electric carrying object experiences a spike in voltage. Jun Ong had an idea that such a glitch could be presented as a 3D object on a large scale. For a first time viewer, Star looks like an error, looking out of place with its placement in a bare concrete building, in a fading town.

Jun Ong says that like most of his works, Star was inspired by nature’s light and outer space. The artwork seeks to show both sides of the intangibility as well as tangibility of light. Jun Ong also transforms other generic LED strips and steel cables into art.

Jun Ong is known for his light sculptures. His ideas are applicable in many spaces. A majority of his works are done using pristine LED tubes. Star was his first attempt at a large scale light installation.

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia


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The exhibition of the year? Giacometti / Bacon at Fondation Beyeler

The exhibition of the year? Giacometti / Bacon at Fondation Beyeler

Installation view of Bacon - Giacometti at Fondation Beyeler, L Homme qui marche by Alberto Giacometti along other works 1
Installation view of BaconGiacometti at Fondation Beyeler, L Homme qui marche by Alberto Giacometti among other works, 2018
Photo: Public Delivery

About the Alberto Giacometti & Francis Bacon exhibition at Fondation Beyeler

The Fondation Beyeler sheds light on the exciting relationship between Alberto Giacometti and Francis Bacon. Both artists have created impressive works, which are now among the most expensive artworks.

The age difference between the older Giacometti and Bacon is eight years. Even before meeting him in person, the younger artist worshipped Bergell as “the greatest draughtsman of all time”. Later he was to say that Giacometti was the man who influenced him more than anyone else. Giacometti, on the other hand, was fascinated by the irrepressible energy in the art of Bacon. In addition to Bacon’s portraits, his own portraits would appear more prudish, says Giacometti.

The exhibition includes key works and is supplemented by rarely shown works by both artists, some of which have never before been shown to the public before. A multimedia room offers spectacular insight into the studios of both artists.

Installation views

Installation view of Bacon - Giacometti at Fondation Beyeler
Installation view of BaconGiacometti at Fondation Beyeler
Photo: Public Delivery

Triptychs by Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon - Triptych Inspired by the Oresteia of Aeschylus, 1981, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm) installation view
Francis BaconTriptych Inspired by the Oresteia of Aeschylus, 1981, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Triptych Inspired by the Oresteia of Aeschylus, 1981, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)
Francis BaconTriptych Inspired by the Oresteia of Aeschylus, 1981, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)

Francis Bacon - Triptych, 1967 Oil on canvas
Francis BaconTriptych, 1967, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Triptych, 1967 Oil on canvas, triptych
Francis BaconTriptych, 1967, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)

Francis Bacon - In Memory of George Dyer, 1971, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm) installation view
Francis BaconIn Memory of George Dyer, 1971, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - In Memory of George Dyer, 1971, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)
Francis BaconIn Memory of George Dyer, 1971, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)

Paintings by Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon - Portrait of George Dyer Riding a Bicycle, 1966, Oil and sand on canvas
Francis BaconPortrait of George Dyer Riding a Bicycle, 1966, Oil and sand on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Portrait of George Dyer Riding a Bicycle, 1966, Oil and sand on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)
Francis BaconPortrait of George Dyer Riding a Bicycle, 1966, Oil and sand on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)

Francis Bacon - Lying Figure, 1969, Oil on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm) installation view
Francis BaconLying Figure, 1969, Oil on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Lying Figure, 1969, Oil on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)
Francis BaconLying Figure, 1969, Oil on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)

Francis Bacon - 1974 - 1975 Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas 78 x 58 in. (198.1 x 147.3 cm), installation view
Francis BaconTwo Studies from the Human Body, 1974-1975, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198.1 x 147.3 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Two Studies from the Human Body, 1975
Francis BaconTwo Studies from the Human Body, 1974-1975, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198.1 x 147.3 cm)

Francis Bacon - Lying Figure, 1961, oil on canvas, 198.0 × 142.0 Size (cm), 78.0 × 55.9 Size (in), installation view
Francis BaconLying Figure, 1961, oil on canvas, 198.0 × 142.0 Size (cm), 78.0 × 55.9 Size (in), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Lying Figure, 1961, oil on canvas, 198.0 × 142.0 Size (cm), 78.0 × 55.9 Size (in)
Francis Bacon – Lying Figure, 1961, oil on canvas, 198.0 × 142.0 Size (cm), 78.0 × 55.9 Size (in).jpg
Francis BaconLying Figure, 1961, oil on canvas, 198.0 × 142.0 Size (cm), 78.0 × 55.9 Size (in), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland

Installation view of paintings by Francis Bacon at Fondation Beyeler
Installation view of paintings by Francis Bacon at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti sculptures

Francis Bacon - Head VI, 1949 and Alberto Giacometti - Le nez, 1947-49
Francis BaconHead VI, 1949 and Alberto GiacomettiLe nez, 1947-49
Photo: Fondation Beyeler

Alberto Giacometti - Le nez, 1947-49, 43,6 × 9 × 61,6 cm
Alberto GiacomettiLe nez, 1947-49, 43,6 × 9 × 61,6 cm, installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Grande Tête Mince, 1954, 65.6 x 39.1 x 24.9 cm, installaton view
Alberto GiacomettiGrande Tête Mince, 1954, 65.6 x 39.1 x 24.9 cm, installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Grande Tête Mince, 1954, 65.6 x 39.1 x 24.9 cm
Alberto GiacomettiGrande Tête Mince, 1954, 65.6 x 39.1 x 24.9 cm
Photo: Succession Alberto Giacometti/2018, ProLitteris, Zurich

Alberto Giacometti and Francis Bacon, 1965
Alberto Giacometti and Bacon, 1965, original photo by Graham Keen
Photo: Public Delivery

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A first look at the new, intimate Giacometti museum in Paris

A first look at the new, intimate Giacometti museum in Paris

Alberto Giacometti museum, Montparnasse, Paris, reconstructed atelier
Reconstructed studio of Alberto Giacometti on 23m2 including more than 70 original artworks at Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

About the Institut Giacometti, Paris

Swiss sculptor and painter Alberto Giacometti has a new exhibition space in Paris. Hosted in an Art Nouveau villa, this museum shows a reconstruction of his legendary studio, including furniture and walls on which he left numerous sketches. The new space is located in the former artists’ district of Montparnasse, just a few blocks from the original Parisian studio, where Giacometti worked from 1926 until his death in 1966.

Some of the artworks are very fragile and have never been shown in public. This project is initiated by the Fondation Giacometti, which owns the largest Giacometti collection worldwide.

Location of the Giacometti Institute, Paris

Address Giacometti Institute, 5 Rue Victor Schoelcher, 75014 Paris
Hours The Institute is open by an online reservation system
Visit Métro ligne 4 et 6 : Raspail ou Denfert-Rochereau; RER B : Denfert-Rochereau; Bus ligne : 38, 68, 88, ou 91

Photos of the Institut Giacometti, Paris

Alberto Giacometti museum, Montparnasse, Paris, outside
Exterior of the Art Nouveau villa which hosts the Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Femmes de Venise
Alberto GiacomettiFemmes de Venise, 1956, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Portrait of Jean Genet, 1954-1955, Oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cm
Alberto GiacomettiPortrait of Jean Genet, 1954-1955, Oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cm, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - interior
Interior of Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - interior
Interior of Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - sculpture
Alberto Giacometti, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris, Art Noveau Villa
Interior of Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - installation view
Installation view, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - drawing 1
Alberto Giacometti drawing, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - drawing 2
Alberto Giacometti drawing, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - letter
Alberto Giacometti letter, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - sculpture 1
Alberto Giacometti sculpture, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

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