Archive: 2015
Large bright floating star blazes in white light

Large bright floating star blazes in white light

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Installed in Penang, Malaysia, Star was a large-scale light sculpture in the shape of a star by artist and architect Jun Ong.

The star is set at the core of an unfinished concrete building and spans all the five floors from the ground to the roof. It forms a 12-sided polygon also called a dodecahedron in 3D, which is visible from several kilometres away. The light installation blazes in white light encompassing the whole building but seems like a bright floating star when seen from far.

Star is made from over 500 meters of steel cables and LED light strips. The wires are attached to different surfaces; the ground, cantilever beams, slabs, and adjacent building. When lit and seen from a distance, the light beams look seamless. At a closer rance, it seems as though they penetrate the floors uninterrupted.

The idea of an abstract light installation was inspired by a ‘glitch’ which are the visible arcs of light that form when an electric carrying object experiences a spike in voltage. Jun Ong had an idea that such a glitch could be presented as a 3D object on a large scale. For a first time viewer, Star looks like an error, looking out of place with its placement in a bare concrete building, in a fading town.

Jun Ong says that like most of his works, Star was inspired by nature’s light and outer space. The artwork seeks to show both sides of the intangibility as well as tangibility of light. Jun Ong also transforms other generic LED strips and steel cables into art.

Jun Ong is known for his light sculptures. His ideas are applicable in many spaces. A majority of his works are done using pristine LED tubes. Star was his first attempt at a large scale light installation.

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia


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Why does Lara Almarcegui create massive piles of rubble?

Why does Lara Almarcegui create massive piles of rubble?

's Main Hall, 2010, Installation View, Secession, Vienna, Austria
Lara AlmarceguiConstruction Rubble of Secession’s Main Hall, 2010, Installation View, Secession, Vienna, Austria

Introduction

Spanish born Lara Almarcegui who currently lives in Rotterdam has always had a deep curiosity for examining processes of contemporary transformation that are brought about by the social, political and economic transformations in society. Since the early 1990s, Lara has examined urban areas that most artists choose not focus on such as rubble from construction materials and stuff from wastelands. Lara carefully catalogs and highlights each location’s inclination towards entropy or lack of order and predictability.

The meaning of her works

Her projects vary based on the intention of the message. For instance, she developed a guide to the wastelands in Amsterdam consisting of materials used to establish the wasteland in its raw form. Lara has managed to consolidate a reputation for herself as a respectable and revered artist in the global artist realm. In 2013, her work allowed her to act as Spain’s only representative in the 55th Venice Biennial.

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Why are these golden balloons all over Taipei?

Why are these golden balloons all over Taipei?

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Eslite Spectrum Songyan - Snobs
Silence Was GoldenSnobs, Eslite Spectrum Songyan

In 2015, Public Delivery collaborated with the Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art, Taiwan’s first museum to be dedicated exclusively to contemporary art and one of the most prominent art institutions of Asia. Silence Was Golden is our on-going global public art project which is centered around words or short phrases made out of golden letter shaped balloons, chosen by performers to express their feelings towards their environment and the histories surrounding it. Words were collected through an open call, and then performed together with a variety of people, including students from Tainan National University of the Arts, National Taiwan Normal University, Tamkang University and Taipei Jingmei Girls High School in different locations all over Taipei.

Up until now, the project was performed 253 times in 1/4 of the world’s countries (179 cities, 48 countries, six continents).

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Huashan Creative Park - Anxious
Silence Was GoldenAnxious, Huashan Creative Park

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall - Boss
Silence Was GoldenBoss, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Bitan Suspension Bridge - Date
Silence Was GoldenDate, Bitan Suspension Bridge

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Xindian ghost house - Fear
Silence Was GoldenFear, Xindian ghost house

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - 228 Peace Memorial Park - Hustle
Silence Was GoldenHustle, 228 Peace Memorial Park

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Museum of Contemporary Art - Noisy
Silence Was GoldenNoisy, Museum of Contemporary Art

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Elephant Mountain - Nose
Silence Was GoldenNose, Elephant Mountain

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Guang Hua Night Market - Savour
Silence Was GoldenSavour, Guang Hua Night Market

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Xindian, Bitan tea house - Tea
Silence Was GoldenTea, Bitan tea house

Silence Was Golden, Balloon - Taipei, Taiwan - Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall - Temple
Silence Was GoldenTemple, Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall

Map of balloon performances in Taipei, Taiwan
Map of balloon performances


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Karina Smigla-Bobinski’s unpredictable paintings on museum walls

Karina Smigla-Bobinski’s unpredictable paintings on museum walls

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, 2013

ADA, a kinetic sculpture by Karina Smigla-Bobinski, stands out for being interactive and unpredictable; Imagine a giant ball that is filled with helium gas and its surface covered with charcoal spikes. The helium causes the ball to be suspended in the air and the charcoal sticks provide grips and a medium with which to create art.

Through numerous exhibitions ADA is getting immense attention from visitors and the best part is, you do not have to be an artist yourself to enjoy the experience. Visitors get to push the ball which moves freely in space because it is not attached to anything and as the ball comes into contact with the surrounding walls, the charcoal sticks draw ambiguous lines on them. The result of what is drawn is never predictable and it is perhaps this feeling of suspense that keeps visitors coming back.

ADA is a transparent globe that resembles a molecular hybrid. The helium inside it and the hedgehog like surface give it an autonomous bounce from wall to wall. The ball is covered with 300 charcoal sticks with a spacing of 10 inches from one another. The technique behind it was developed by Smigla-Bobinski purposely for this art piece. Moving the ball to create patterns on the wall is interesting but what is even more enjoyable to do is to watch as people try to control the ball with their weight.

While the charcoal sticks come into contact with the white walls, every stroke is unique because of the direction in which the ball is thrust, the force applied, the level to which it is bent and the angle of contact with the wall. You will be frustrated if you approach this activity with intelligence so visitors are advised to just flow with the energy of the ball as their energy floats with it.

The artist Smigla-Bobisnki might never fully understand the therapeutic nature of what she had created but here is a canvas that was started by an expert and is being completed by anyone who has the interest and time to play with a floating ball of helium.

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, The Lowry, Manchester, UK, 2015
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, The Lowry, Manchester, UK, 2015

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, Russia, 2013
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010, Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, 2013

Karina Smigla-Bobinski - ADA, 2010
Karina Smigla-BobinskiADA, 2010

Video


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“Hunger King” is Jani Leinonen’s fast food reply to social inequality and homelessness

“Hunger King” is Jani Leinonen’s fast food reply to social inequality and homelessness

Jani Leinonen - Hunger King, 2014, Hungary, Budapest 1
Jani LeinonenHunger King, 2014, Hungary, Budapest

Located behind a resplendent Opera House in Budapest on the same road as Louis Vuitton, sits Hunger King, a place that seems to be just like any other burger joint, however, it is anything but. Hunger King is a regular fast food outlet that is pushed onto the masses; Hunger King is a critical sociopolitical art installation serving to highlight Hungary’s significant crises of social inequality and homelessness.

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How do 37,000 inflated balloons look like when put in a museum? – Martin Creed

How do 37,000 inflated balloons look like when put in a museum? – Martin Creed

Martin Creed - Work No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011 - 2.jpg

Martin Creed - Work No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011 - 2.jpg
Martin CreedWork No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011

Introduction

Martin Creed’s Work Half the Air in a Given Space, is a brilliantly fun way to experience interactive art. As an audience member, you find yourself pushing your way through a space, whether it be a room or a hallway or a lobby, filled (only halfway) with up to 37,000 balloons. You as an audience member are completely surrounded by marshmallows, and although the image is joyfully preposterous, however, as you get into the space you find you feel a mixture of emotions including exhilaration, disorientation, but don’t be surprised if you feel a little bit claustrophobic.

What is globophobia?

Half the Air in a Given Space can be described as an interactive installation (which is easily an understatement if anything). This is every child’s dream or every globophobic’s worst nightmare (globophobia is the fear of balloons), basically, a space that’s filled with of hundreds or thousands of balloons of the same color. Half a room’s entire volume is filled with balloons, and visitors become a part of the art by walking through the balloon filled room.

For those who are not globophobic or claustrophobic, this piece is supposed to evoke the feeling of deep celebration and remanence of childhood memories. If you have no problem with balloons or small spaces, you can be pretty much guaranteed that you will leave the installation with a smile on your face from the touch of nostalgia you have emerged from.

different versions of Half the Air in a Given Space

In 2012, Creed installed four versions of this work in neighborhoods throughout the city, each site featured a different colored balloon. Thus not only are audience members who brave the balloons submerged in a room half filled with air, but they are submerged in the color, in a supernatural world in which their senses cannot fully be relied on, a world in which beauty and playfulness is combined.

Photos of Half the Air in a Given Space

Martin Creed - Work No. 200. Half the air in a given space, 1998 Courtesy the artist and Hauser © Martin Creed
Martin CreedWork No. 200. Half the air in a given space, 1998
Courtesy the artist and Hauser © Martin Creed

Martin Creed - Work No. 200. Half the air in a given space, at Tate St.Ives, 2011
Martin CreedWork No. 200. Half the air in a given space, at Tate St.Ives, 2011
Photo by Rosa Park

Martin Creed - Work No. 200. Half the air in a given space, at Tate St.Ives, 2011, Photo by Rosa Park
Martin CreedWork No. 200. Half the air in a given space, at Tate St.Ives, 2011
Photo by Rosa Park

Martin Creed - Work No. 200. Half the air in a given space, at Tate St.Ives, 2011
Martin CreedWork No. 200. Half the air in a given space, at Tate St.Ives, 2011

Martin Creed - Work No. 204. Half the air in a given space, 1999, dimensions variable, City Gallery, Historic Water Tower, Chicago, 2012, Photo- Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Martin CreedWork No. 204. Half the air in a given space, 1999, dimensions variable, City Gallery, Historic Water Tower, Chicago, 2012
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago

Martin Creed - Work No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011
Martin CreedWork No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011

Martin Creed - Work No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011
Martin CreedWork No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011

Martin Creed - Work No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011, Photo by Moby
Martin CreedWork No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011
Photo: Moby

Martin Creed - Work No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011
Martin CreedWork No. 247. Half the air in a given space, 2000, Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Vigo, 2011

Martin Creed - Work No. 329. Half the air in a given space, 2004. Rennie Collection
Martin CreedWork No. 329. Half the air in a given space, 2004, Rennie Collection

Martin Creed - Work No. 329. Half the Air in a Given Space
Martin CreedWork No. 329. Half the air in a given space

Martin Creed - Work No. 360. Half the Air in a Given Space, 2015, Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, Photo by Evan Chakroff
Martin CreedWork No. 360. Half the air in a given space, Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, 2015
Photo by Evan Chakroff

Martin Creed - Work No. 360. Half the Air in a Given Space, 2015, Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle
Martin CreedWork No. 360. Half the air in a given space, Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, 2015

Martin Creed - Work No. 965. Half the Air in a Given Space, 2008, multiple pieces, The Cleveland Museum Of Art
Martin CreedWork No. 965. Half the air in a given space, 2008, multiple pieces, The Cleveland Museum Of Art

Martin Creed - Work No. 965. Half the Air in a Given Space, 2008, multiple pieces, The Cleveland Museum Of Art
Martin CreedWork No. 965. Half the air in a given space, 2008, multiple pieces, The Cleveland Museum Of Art

Martin Creed - Work No. 1562. Half the air in a given space, 2015, THEMUSEUM, Kitchener, Canada
Martin CreedWork No. 1562. Half the air in a given space, THEMUSEUM, Kitchener, Canada, 2015

Martin Creed - Work No. 1562. Half the air in a given space, 2015, THEMUSEUM, Kitchener, Canada
Martin CreedWork No. 1562. Half the air in a given space, THEMUSEUM, Kitchener, Canada, 2015

Martin Creed - Work No. 1562. Half the air in a given space, 2015, THEMUSEUM, Kitchener, Canada
Martin CreedWork No. 1562. Half the air in a given space, THEMUSEUM, Kitchener, Canada, 2015

Martin Creed - Work No. 2497. Half the air in a given space, 2015, Park Avenue Armory
Martin CreedWork No. 2497. Half the air in a given space, Park Avenue Armory, NYC, 2015

Martin Creed - Work No. 2497. Half the air in a given space, 2015. dimensions variable. Phoenix Art Museum. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Martin CreedWork No. 2497. Half the air in a given space, dimensions variable. Phoenix Art Museum
Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

Related works


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Ana Teresa Fernandez makes US-Mexico Border Wall disappear

Ana Teresa Fernandez makes US-Mexico Border Wall disappear

Ana Teresa Fernandez - Erasing the Border - Borrando la Frontera - Playas de Tijuana
Ana Teresa FernándezErasing the Border – Borrando la Frontera, 2012, Playas de Tijuana, Mexico

Ana Teresa Fernández, an artist born in Tampico, Mexico who studied in San Francisco, California and Lausanne, Switzerland, is known for her ability to make a powerful statement. Her statement is especially strong when it comes to the politics of space and place.

Her piece, “Erasing the Border” is one of her most commanding works in which alongside a number of other artist, residents, students and activists, she led an attack against the Mexico-US border wall, with the goal of “erasing” sections of the border. Sections of the fence were painted by Fernández to match the vast sky so that when viewed from afar there is the illusion of gaps in the fence. This appearance of a broken link, a useless border, is an effective statement on the arbitrary concept of borders separating place from place.

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