Archive: light
Tokujin Yoshioka’s ‘Rainbow Church’ – The liberation of light

Tokujin Yoshioka’s ‘Rainbow Church’ – The liberation of light

Tokujin-Yoshioka-Rainbow-Church-installation-view-feat

Tokujin Yoshioka - Rainbow Church installation view

‘Rainbow Church’

Rainbow church is aptly named and refers to an eight-meter-high installation that creates a rainbow as light is refracted within its space. The installation is a wall of crystal prism that throws off rainbows to anyone within the installation space. The 500 crystal prisms that make up the installation allow light passing through them to be refracted, creating rainbow hues in the areas around the installation and the adjacent walls resulting in an effect seen with stained glass only in this case there is no stained glass. One can interpret Rainbow Church in a number of ways. One interpretation draws upon the relationship between man and nature and hence creates a scene where form is given to it as his creation such as in the case of light into rainbows.

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Large bright floating star blazes in white light

Large bright floating star blazes in white light

Jun Ong – Star, 2015, Penang, Malaysia
Jun OngStar, 2015, 500m steel cables, LED strips, Penang, Malaysia

Installed in Penang, Malaysia, Star was a large-scale light sculpture in the shape of a star by artist and architect Jun Ong.

About

The star is set at the core of an unfinished concrete building that spans all five floors from the ground to the roof. It forms a 12-sided polygon also called a dodecahedron in 3D, which is visible from several kilometers away. The light installation blazes in white light encompassing the whole building, but it seems like a bright floating star when seen from afar.

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Destroyed and Reconstructed – Lucio Fontana’s mesmerizing neon installations

Destroyed and Reconstructed – Lucio Fontana’s mesmerizing neon installations

Lucio Fontana - Struttura al Neon per la IX Triennale di Milano, 1951:2017, installation view at Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan, 2017. Photo Agostino Osio
Lucio FontanaStruttura al Neon per la IX Triennale di Milano, 1951/2017, installation view at Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan, 2017
Photo: Agostino Osio

About Lucio Fontana

Lucio Fontana’s interest in technological and scientific advancements that occurred during the 20th century largely inspired his approach to a wide array of methods and mediums. For instance, he has worked with stone, neon, ceramics and even metals. As a painter, he went beyond two-dimensional surfaces by engaging technology as a means to attain expressions of the 4th dimension. By going beyond the expected, Lucio managed to create an innovative and new aesthetic dialect that blended painting, sculpture, and architecture.

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Kimsooja’s sound of breath and rainbows in crystal palace

Kimsooja’s sound of breath and rainbows in crystal palace

Kimsooja – To Breathe - A Mirror Woman, 2006, Palacio de Cristal, Parque del Retiro, Madrid
KimsoojaTo Breathe – A Mirror Woman, 2006, Palacio de Cristal, Parque del Retiro, Madrid, Spain

About Kimsooja

Kimsooja is a Korean-born artist that has won recognition around the world. Despite living in New York, her work is exhibited across Europe, Asia and America. Her work includes performances, photographs, installations and videos. Her work involves a number of subjects like relationships with others, nomadism and the role of women among other people in dealing with challenges that we meet every day.

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46 years in the making: Doug Wheeler creates visual feel of infinity

46 years in the making: Doug Wheeler creates visual feel of infinity

Doug Wheeler - PSAD Synthetic Desert III, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Photo David Heald
Doug WheelerPSAD Synthetic Desert III, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Photo: David Heald

Backstory

Over 40 years ago, a leading Light and Space artist called Doug Wheeler imagined an art project that resembled the tranquility you would experience if you travelled to an expansive desert such as the one in Arizona. For a long time, the idea only existed on paper due to the amount of resources it required to get going.

Doug Wheeler’s ‘chamber’

Luckily, a while back, the Guggenheim Museum in New York decided to take up the project and realize the Doug’s dream.

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Nabana no Sato: 8 million LED lights illuminate Japanese town

Nabana no Sato: 8 million LED lights illuminate Japanese town

Nabana no Sato - Winter Illumination - Light Tunnel 1
Winter Illumination at Nabana no Sato, Kuwana, Japan

Japan & light festivals

Japan seems to be way ahead of the rest of the world when it comes to experimenting with lights. It is a culture throughout the country to have impressive light festivals over winter. Other than showcasing the creativity of new talent every year, such festivals give life to the boring weather of winter. It is no wonder that most people love to extend these displays well into spring.

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Why did Olafur Eliasson try to recreate the sun in a museum?

Why did Olafur Eliasson try to recreate the sun in a museum?

Olafur Eliasson - The Weather Project, 2003, Tate Modern, London
Olafur EliassonThe Weather Project, 2003, Monofrequency lights, projection foil, haze machines, mirror foil, aluminium, and scaffolding, 26.7×22.3×155.4m, Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, London
Photo: Olafur Eliasson / Tate, London

About the Weather Project

Olafur Eliasson has created a gigantic installation which in 2003 took over all space in Tate Modern, London. The artwork, a sun rising out of a mist was bound to keep any visitor in awe. In this project named The Weather Project, the Scandinavian artist recreated the sun and the sky to occupy the Turbine Hall. The whole space was covered with a fine mist that seeps into the whole space like it was coming from the outside space. Looking ahead to see if the mist escapes into the outer space, visitors saw in place of the ceiling, a replica of the space below – like a mirror. There were 200 low-sodium mono-frequency lamps at the extreme end of the hall as well. Mono-frequency lamps are mostly used in street lights and the frequency at which they emit light is so low that any other color besides black and yellow are invisible. These lamps, therefore, change the view and landscape of the environment into one with two tones.

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