Luke Jerram stunning moon replicas – Created from NASA imagery

Last updated:

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 2

Luke Jerram -- Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Published: May 24, 2017

Last updated:

About the Museum of the Moon

Bristol native and artist Luke Jerram has an unerring knack for creating arresting public art projects. One of his recent works is Museum of the Moon, a model of the moon, that was singlehandedly created by Jerram. It is so realistic in its detailing and features such that each centimeter of the spherical structure represents 5km of the moon’s surface. The spherical surface is covered with accurate pictures of the moon and the inside is lit internally to make it as similar looking to the actual moon as possible.

Jerram used official images taken by NASA

The moon, which is 7-meter diameters, was designed and intended to be a touring art piece. The light included within the gigantic sphere helps to make the imagery more visible. To ensure that the renderings were as realistic as possible, Jerram had to make use of official images that NASA had taken before using bright colored lights to backlight the inside of the sculpture.

How did Jerram come up with the idea for the moon?

Jerram came up with the idea of the piece because of the moon’s universal appeal and influence; the moon looks the same and it has the same effect regardless of where in the world it can be seen. The moon has always served the role of a cultural mirror that reflects people’s traditions, cultures, and beliefs. As such, the moon can be classified as a god that has inspired the development of numerous art forms including music, poetry, language and art. The Museum of the Moon was therefore created as an homage to the natural wonder.

Impact

Because people have different beliefs about the moon and its power, Jerram’s sculpture was designed to be showcased in different parts of the world. This way, the moon will provoke different sensations, thoughts, and feelings depending on where in the world it is being observed. The purpose was to create something that is both attractive and a piece that can also invite questions about life in general. In the end, the hope is that audiences will be moved to reconnect with the ubiquitous moon as they explore the impact of the moon on various cultures and societies.

Videos

Museum of the Moon at St. Thomas’ Church, Kendal, UK, 2016
2 min 48 sec

Museum of the Moon at Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral
1 min 2 sec

Photos

Installation photos
Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017 3

Luke Jerram -- Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon - University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Luke Jerram -- Museum of the Moon, illuminated balloon replica of the moon created from detailed NASA imagery, moonlight and surround soundscape, 7m (23 ft) in diameter, University of Bristol Great Hall, Wills Memorial Building, Bristol, 2017

Behind the scenes
Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, installation of the mooon

Luke Jerram -- Museum of the Moon, installation of the moon

Luke Jerram - Museum of the Moon, photo from inside the Moon

Luke Jerram inside of Museum of the Moon

The artwork was created by the Astrogeology Science Centre in the USA. The imagery was taken by a NASA satellite carrying the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera.

The structures are being made by Cameron Balloons

All images by Luke Jerram unless otherwise noted.

Related articles

 

Discover more ..

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*


Stay in touch

We would love to keep the conversation going.

Please join us on Pinterest, YouTube or Instagram.

Want inspiration in your inbox?