Archive: exhibition
These helium-filled balloons create striking installations

These helium-filled balloons create striking installations

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Black), Louis Vuitton Foundation
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Black), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Louis Vuitton Foundation

About Philippe Parreno

Philippe Parreno likes to work across different mediums. As a result, throughout his career that has spanned decades, he has been able to blur the lines between film, photography, documentaries, and various other types of media. He has built up an interest over the years that has allowed him to distort the established boundaries that exist between real-time and the cinematic impression of time passage.

Parreno’s speech bubbles

Speech Bubbles, created in 1997, consists of massive cartoonish 3D speech bubbles that had been trapped against the ceiling of the gallery. Unmarked and floating in the gallery space, the speech bubbles have been filled with helium to make them weightless and also enable them to congregate and drift in one area.

Interpretation

Parreno designed his Speech Bubbles to hover on the ceiling of the space that they occupied creating a massive cloud with the intention of paying less attention to the architecture and more attention to the story. This philosophy and line of thought are completely in line with Parenno’s legacy of transforming gallery and museum spaces.

Additionally, the cloud that is created by the speech bubbles helps to change the nature of the space in which they are contained. By including them in the gallery, Parenno automatically creates a high-tech environment that is almost futuristic, managing to successfully link the present with the future.

Since the bubbles are also unmarked, Parreno was inviting visitors to inject meaning into them. As you may already know, speech bubbles are used commonly in comic books and cartoons to allow words and conversations to be understood. In this sense, the bubbles are frozen and empty without words or thoughts. As such, it is up to the attendee to fill them with meaningful language and in doing so, Parreno successfully turns audiences into protagonists that have the ability to control where the conversation goes.

Influenced by Andy Warhol?

According to some critiques, Parreno was also paying homage to the Silver Clouds which was created by Andy Warhol and exhibited back in 1966 in a New York gallery. However, while Warhol’s balloons were always in silver (and not speech bubbles at all), his were designed to defy density and gravity. Parreno’s speech bubbles, on the other hand, were designed to be filled with imagination.

This post-modern perspective of contemporary art, which Parenno shares with many other successful artists such as Warhol, helps to explain why Parreno’s bubbles are an asset that introduces audiences to new ways of inhabiting and exploring the world.

Black version

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Black), Louis Vuitton Foundation, photo Marc Domage
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Black), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Louis Vuitton Foundation
Photo: Marc Domage

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Black), Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art in Porto, 2017
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Black), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art in Porto, 2017

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Black), Louis Vuitton Foundation, photo Marc Domage (detail)
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Black) (detail), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Louis Vuitton Foundation
Photo: Marc Domage

Blue version

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Blue), A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017, Photo Andrea Rossetti
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Blue), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017
Photo: Andrea Rossetti

Fuchsia version

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Fuchsia), Art Basel Miami Beach 2015, Esther Schipper 1
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Fuchsia), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Art Basel Miami Beach 2015, Esther Schipper

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Fuchsia), Art Basel Miami Beach 2015, Esther Schipper
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Fuchsia), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Art Basel Miami Beach 2015, Esther Schipper

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Fuchsia), Art Basel Miami Beach 2015, Esther Schipper
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Fuchsia), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Art Basel Miami Beach 2015, Esther Schipper

Gold version

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Gold), 2009, Gold Mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2010
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Gold), 2009, Gold Mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2010

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Gold), 2009, Gold Mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2010 photo Denis Mortell
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Gold), 2009, Gold Mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, 2010
Photo: Denis Mortell

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Gold), 2009, photo Stefanie Grätz
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Gold), 2009, Mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable
Photo: Stefanie Grätz

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Gold), A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017 Photo Andrea Rossetti
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Gold), 2009, Mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017
Photo: Andrea Rossetti

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Gold), Yuz Museum, Shanghai, 2018
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Gold), Mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Yuz Museum, Shanghai, 2018

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Gold), 2009, Gold Mylar balloons, helium, Art Basel 2015
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Gold), 2009, Mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Art Basel 2015

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Gold)
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Gold), 2009, Mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially-oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Art Basel 2015

Green version

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Green), 2015, 1,500 Mylar balloons, helium, mould of balloons, certificate, 68.0 × 109.0 × 25.0 Size (cm), Hong Kong Art Basel 2016
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Green), 2015, 1,500 Mylar balloons, helium, mould of balloons, certificate, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Hong Kong Art Basel 2016

Grey version

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Grey), A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017 Photo Andrea Rossetti
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Grey), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017
Photo: Andrea Rossetti

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Grey) (foreground), 1997
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Grey) (foreground), 1997, mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable

Red version

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Red), A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Red), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Red), 2012, ten mylar balloons and red net, installation dimensions variable
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Red), 2012, ten mylar balloons and red net, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable

Silver version

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Silver), 2009, From November 5 until they fall down ..., Castello di Rivoli, Museum of Contemporary Art, Rivoli, Turin, 2010, Enea Righi Collection
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Silver), 2009, From November 5 until they fall down …, silver mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Castello di Rivoli, Museum of Contemporary Art, Rivoli, Turin, 2010, Enea Righi Collection

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Silver), 2009 (on ceiling; background) Silver Mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 2009
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Silver), 2009 (on ceiling; background), Silver mylar foil (PET foil out of biaxially oriented polyethylene terephthalate), helium, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 2009

Transparent version

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Transparent), A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017 Photo Andrea Rossetti 2
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Transparent), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017
Photo: Andrea Rossetti

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles (Transparent), A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017 Photo Andrea Rossetti 1
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles (Transparent), mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017
Photo: Andrea Rossetti

Other photos

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017 Photo Andrea Rossetti
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles, mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017
Photo: Andrea Rossetti

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017 Photo Andrea Rossetti
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles, mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017
Photo: Andrea Rossetti

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017 Photo Andrea Rossetti
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles, mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, A Time Coloured Space, Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Fundação de Serralves, Porto, 2017
Photo: Andrea Rossetti

Philippe Parreno - Speech Bubbles, 1997, FRAC Nord-Pas de Calais, photo Emmanuel Watteau
Philippe Parreno – Speech Bubbles, 1997, mylar balloons, helium, black ribbon, each balloon: 109 x 68 x 29 cm, dimensions variable, FRAC Nord-Pas de Calais
Photo: Emmanuel Watteau

Related works


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments
Why are these 40 TVs installed between tropical plants?

Why are these 40 TVs installed between tropical plants?

Nam June Paik - TV Garden, 1974 (2002 Version), video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation 4
Nam June Paik – TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation

About TV Garden

No one would think televisions are artistic under normal circumstances. Handy, yes. Useful, quite so. Nam June Paik, however, managed to put television in circumstances where he reveals their artistry. The celebrated artist is regarded as the father of video art and has used manipulated television sets, broadcasted live performances and video installation to depict electronic images in an artistic manner. TV Garden first created in 1974 is a large-scale installation consisting of forty television sets lying on the floor amidst many tropical plants while a video of Global Groove (see below) plays on the screens of the TV sets.

There are many interpretations one can draw including the rather obvious one that this is a merge of nature and technology and the effect each has with the other or on the other hand, the numerous curated content in the media could be considered disorderly as to leading the public back into the jungle. One thing is evident though that TV Garden seeks to tease the senses with a mixture of color and sound. Color from the lush tropical garden makes the canvas for his TV sets. Sound emanates from the TV sets and rustles through the leaves of the various plants that the television sets are nestled among. This artwork grabs the eye and the mind in its juxtaposition effect where the attention of the viewer moves from plant life to television sets and vice versa.

The Artist – Style and Inspiration

Nam June Paik was born in Korea in 1932 and graduated from the University of Tokyo in 1956 where he studies music and study furthering these musical studies at the University of Munich. In Germany, he allowed his fascination with merging music, electronics and arts to reign free. Since then, the artist had used this fascination to make art using television sets featured in video walls, ceilings, quirky robots and floors among other ventures. This has evolved and his work continued to playfully critique and celebrate electronic media.

Paik drew inspiration from his interest in electronics intertwined with his foundation in music and performance. In the mid-1960s, he arrived in New York and joined the Fluxus movement and quickly rose to the forefront of the movement with his work depicting elements of surprise and unfamiliarity. His production, TV garden, is one of the seminal installations resulting from this inspiration and resulted in a merging of the scientific and the natural coming together in a surprisingly aesthetic outcome. TV garden is an example of why an artist should not limit new forms of expression but must keep on reimagining his creativity to bring about innovation.

At Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Nam June Paik - TV Garden, 1974 (2000 version), video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 2
Nam June Paik – TV Garden (2000 Version), 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Nam June Paik - TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation
Nam June Paik – TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

v
Nam June Paik – TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Nam June Paik - TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation
Nam June Paik – TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Nam June Paik - TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation
Nam June Paik – TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Nam June Paik - TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation
Nam June Paik – TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Nam June Paik - TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation
Nam June Paik – TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

At Nam June Paik Art Center, South Korea

Nam June Paik - TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Nam June Paik Art Center, Yongin, South Korea
Nam June Paik – TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Nam June Paik Art Center, Yongin, South Korea

Nam June Paik - TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Nam June Paik Art Center, Yongin, South Korea
Nam June Paik – TV Garden, 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Nam June Paik Art Center, Yongin, South Korea

At Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf

Nam June Paik - TV Garden, 1974 (2002 Version), video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen (Düsseldorf, Germany)
Nam June Paik – TV Garden (2002 Version), 1974, video installation with color television sets and live plants, dimensions vary with installation, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, Germany

Global Groove, 1973 (video excerpt)

Nam June Paik – Global Groove, 1973, Video (color, sound), 28 min 30 sec

Related works


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment
This shiny & giant metal Zeppelin invades museums

This shiny & giant metal Zeppelin invades museums

Lee Bul - Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, installation view of Crashing” at Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London, 2018, photo Linda Nylind
Lee Bul – Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Heavy-duty fabric, metalized film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring, dimensions variable, installation view of Crashing at Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London, 2018
Photo: Linda Nylind

Intro

Lee Bul’s installation that saw the transformation of the Southbank Centre’s Hayward Gallery took place in 2018 between May and August. Occupying the entire Hayward Gallery, this exhibition was the artist’s first ever solo show in London. In it, more than 118 other pieces created from the late 1980s to now were also showcased. However, it is the Zeppelin piece that had audiences completely enamored and fascinated during the show.

From the late 1980s to now, this pioneering Korean artist has been instrumental in generating a wide array of artworks, which draw on a mix of references. The Zeppelin, in particular, was designed to transport visitors in attendance to another place and time with the hope of exploring the aspirations of a contemporary society and the resulting failures within it.

About Willing to be Vulnerable

Bul’s work Willing To Be Vulnerable (2015-16) was represented by a massive foil Hindenburg Zeppelin. With this piece, the artist continued her investigation of utopian ideas and their effect on history and society. If you can recall your history, the Zeppelin was an airship that was pioneered and named after the then German Count known as Ferdinand von Zeppelin1.

At the start of the 20th century, these futuristic airships represented modernity and progress but their popularity came to an end after a Zeppelin carrying 96 passengers went up in flames2 while attempting to land. As such, Bul created the piece to draw attention to the different ways that technology can harm people even when the same technology is developed with the best of intentions.

As she did with the other 117 pieces, Bul took advantage of the distinctive design of the gallery and used it as a collaborator rather than just using it as a mere backdrop. The 17-meter-long Zeppelin structure was docked inside the upper galleries of the Haywards and was installed to hover above the gallery’s reflective floors.

Conclusion

Bul has been created thought-provoking artwork since the 1980s. Her work often revisits past experiences in her own life and in history with the hopes of imagining what the future would look like had the events not occurred. Born in South Korea during president Park Chung-hee’s3 dictatorship, Bul saw the rapid modernization that occurred in Korea during the 1960s and 1970s.

Often times, the projects that were undertaken during this period were often left half-finished and the individuals working on them often suffered as a result. As a consequence, her artwork is often strongly related to her upbringing and her childhood, which explains why her work is also so strongly linked to the modern.

“Crashing” exhibition at Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London

Lee Bul - Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, installation view of Crashing” at Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London, 2018, photo Xinhua:Ray Tang
Lee Bul – Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Heavy-duty fabric, metalized film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring, dimensions variable, installation view of Crashing at Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London, 2018
Photo: Xinhua/Ray Tang

Lee Bul - Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, installation view of Crashing” at Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London, 2018
Lee Bul – Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Heavy-duty fabric, metalized film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring, dimensions variable, installation view of Crashing at Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London, 2018

Lee Bul - Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, installation view of Crashing” at Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London, 2018, photo Maxie Fischer
Lee Bul – Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Heavy-duty fabric, metalized film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring, dimensions variable, installation view of Crashing at Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London, 2018
Photo: Maxie Fischer

“Crash” exhibition the Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin

Lee Bul - Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, 2018, photo alliance:dpa
Lee Bul – Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Heavy-duty fabric, metalized film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring, dimensions variable, installation view of Crash at Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, 2018
Photo: Photo alliance/dpa

Lee Bul - Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, 2018
Lee Bul – Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Heavy-duty fabric, metalized film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring, dimensions variable, installation view of Crash at Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, 2018

The Zeppelin at the Biennale of Sydney

Lee Bul - Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Cockatoo Island, Sydney, Australia, photo Ben Symons:Biennale of Sydney)
Lee Bul – Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Heavy-duty fabric, metalized film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring, dimensions variable, installation view on Cockatoo Island at 20th Biennale of Sydney, 2016
Photo: Ben Symons/Biennale of Sydney

Lee Bul - Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Cockatoo Island, Sydney, Australia
Lee Bul – Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Heavy-duty fabric, metalized film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring, dimensions variable, installation view on Cockatoo Island at 20th Biennale of Sydney, 2016

Lee Bul - Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Cockatoo Island, Sydney, Australia, photo Algirdas Bakas
Lee Bul – Willing To Be Vulnerable, 2015–2016, Heavy-duty fabric, metalized film, transparent film, polyurethane ink, fog machine, LED lighting, electronic wiring, dimensions variable, installation view on Cockatoo Island at 20th Biennale of Sydney, 2016
Photo: Algirdas Bakas

Video of Willing To Be Vulnerable at the 20th Biennale of Sydney, 2016

Video interview with Lee Bul

Related readings


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment
Yinka Shonibare spent months of research for this sculpture

Yinka Shonibare spent months of research for this sculpture

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary, photo Stephen White 5

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary, photo Stephen White 5
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Leading UK contemporary artist Yinka Shonibare is an Honored Member of the Order of the British Empire, which is why the moniker MBE has become integral to his title. As one of the most revered and well-recognized contemporary artists in the world today, the name Yinka is synonymous with historical allusions.

Yinka’s amalgamations of noteworthy moments in international and artistic histories imitate his own hybrid Nigerian and British identity. His wax fabrics, which have a complex yet sophisticated pedigree have truly become is signature as is evidenced by the artist’s love for exquisite period costumes, and headless mannequins that mimic classic scenes from world history.

The End of the Empire

Yinka created The End of the Empire to commemorate the centenary celebrations for World War One in England. Margate’s Turner Contemporary, the premier gallery in the town commissioned the piece from Shonibare to comment on the balance of power in Somme 1916 that saw almost one million combatants dead or wounded in the World War offensive.

The End of Empire was created using Dutch wax fabrics that were historically inspired by Indonesian batiks. Oddly, these wax fabrics are today part of African authenticity and it is no wonder that Yinka has opted to feature them heavily in his creations. The End of the Empire featured two Victorian male figures that were both dressed in Victorian costumes fashioned from African textiles. Both the Victorian men had globe heads to represent the opposing sides of World War 1. The alliance by the French and British, as well as that, is the Austro-Hungarians and the Germans are what primarily led to the battle of Somme and this was aptly represented by the slow-moving see-saw that had both foes sitting on each end.

To create the piece, Shonibare had to immerse himself in months of extensive reading and research to be able to capture the spirit of imperialism, as well as colonization. This understanding of what occurred in history is what helped the artist to design an installation that could demonstrate the effects of the war in the hopes that people would finally reconcile or finally come to terms with an aspect of history that is only ever told in today’s classrooms. Offering a metaphor of dialogue, conflict, and balance, the End of Empire was designed to finally force a resolution between the two opposing forces of the World Wars.

In part owing to his continued experimentation with varying forms of media, Shonibare’s art, even the End of an Empire challenges simple categorization, which is probably why Yinka is so critically acclaimed.

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare - End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Yinka Shonibare portrait
Yinka Shonibare MBE – End of Empire, 2016, Turner Contemporary
Photo: Stephen White

Video of ‘End of Empire’

Video interview with Yinka Shonibare MBE


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment
Our top 10: Massive organic sculptures by Jaehyo Lee (이재효)

Our top 10: Massive organic sculptures by Jaehyo Lee (이재효)

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=193061, 1993, stones
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=193061, 1993, stones

Biography

Jaehyo Lee (b. 1965, Hapchen, South Korea) graduated in 1992 with a BFA from the Hong-Ik University in Seoul. Combining distinct traces of Land Art, Arte Povera and Minimalism Lee´s works cast a questioning eye over the roots of form, its function and its role within the natural world.

Lee´s works willfully play with the oft-contested boundaries between modern art and design, referencing the idealist´s cubes, cylinders and cones as perversions of the chaise longue, the coffee table, the lampshade, and even the humble doughnut. Revealing a subtly humorous and unsentimental attitude to nature, what unites these works is a belief that the beauty of art is a product of the labor from whence it comes, whether this be the meticulous carving of larch trunks into the form of a perfect sphere or, equally, the precise bending and sanding of thousands of nails hammered one after another into a hunk of cut lumber.

Artist’s Statement

“Until recently, my work has been about combining wood with nails or steel bars and integrating them into geometrical shapes such as spheres, hemispheres, or cylinders. Whenever I did this, one of my problems was to keep the nails and bolts out of sight. Now, on the contrary, I put an emphasis on the nails themselves. I drive countless nails into wood, bend them, grind them, and make them protrude. I then burn the wood, blackening its growth ring records and its natural color. The glittering metallic nails on the black charcoal become ever more conspicuous, and through this process, I draw a picture on wood using nails. Those who make a hard living may be the ones who make this world a beautiful place. I certainly do not have the power to make it beautiful. I just hope to reveal the beauty in what is usually seen but not noticed. It may be a rusty bent nail. If you take a close look at it, however, you’ll find out how beautiful it can be.”
-Jaehyo Lee

Photos

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - Lotus, 2013, Wood (Korean Big Cone Pine), 216 in; 548.6 cm
Jaehyo LeeLotus, 2013, Wood (Korean Big Cone Pine), 216 in; 548.6 cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=102101, 2002, 350x350x350cm, wood
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=102101, 2002, Wood, 350x350x350cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=107041, 520 x 520 x 520 cm, wood, Korean Eye, Saatchi, 2012
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=107041, 2002, Wood, 520 x 520 x 520 cm, installed at the exhibition Korean Eye, Saatchi Gallery, London, 2012

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=114047, 2014, 700x700x700cm, wood
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=114047, 2014, Wood, 700x700x700cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=191111, 1991, 300x300x350cm, stone
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=191111, 1991, Stone, 300x300x350cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=197073, 1997, 220x220x350cm, stone
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=197073, 1997, Stone, 220x220x350cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=194051, 1994, 150x150x150cm, grass
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=194051, 1994, Grass, 150x150x150cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=115075, 2015, 560x130x360cm, wood
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=115075, 2015, Wood, 560x130x360cm

Jaehyo Lee 이재효 - 0121-1110=1110112, 2011, size variable, snow
Jaehyo Lee0121-1110=1110112, 2011, Snow, size variable


Posted in Top 10 | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
The exhibition of the year? Giacometti / Bacon at Fondation Beyeler

The exhibition of the year? Giacometti / Bacon at Fondation Beyeler

Installation view of Bacon - Giacometti at Fondation Beyeler, L Homme qui marche by Alberto Giacometti along other works 1
Installation view of BaconGiacometti at Fondation Beyeler, L Homme qui marche by Alberto Giacometti among other works, 2018
Photo: Public Delivery

About the Alberto Giacometti & Francis Bacon exhibition at Fondation Beyeler

The Fondation Beyeler sheds light on the exciting relationship between Alberto Giacometti and Francis Bacon. Both artists have created impressive works, which are now among the most expensive artworks.

The age difference between the older Giacometti and Bacon is eight years. Even before meeting him in person, the younger artist worshipped Bergell as “the greatest draughtsman of all time”. Later he was to say that Giacometti was the man who influenced him more than anyone else. Giacometti, on the other hand, was fascinated by the irrepressible energy in the art of Bacon. In addition to Bacon’s portraits, his own portraits would appear more prudish, says Giacometti.

The exhibition includes key works and is supplemented by rarely shown works by both artists, some of which have never before been shown to the public before. A multimedia room offers spectacular insight into the studios of both artists.

Installation views

Installation view of Bacon - Giacometti at Fondation Beyeler
Installation view of BaconGiacometti at Fondation Beyeler
Photo: Public Delivery

Triptychs by Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon - Triptych Inspired by the Oresteia of Aeschylus, 1981, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm) installation view
Francis BaconTriptych Inspired by the Oresteia of Aeschylus, 1981, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Triptych Inspired by the Oresteia of Aeschylus, 1981, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)
Francis BaconTriptych Inspired by the Oresteia of Aeschylus, 1981, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)

Francis Bacon - Triptych, 1967 Oil on canvas
Francis BaconTriptych, 1967, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Triptych, 1967 Oil on canvas, triptych
Francis BaconTriptych, 1967, Oil on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)

Francis Bacon - In Memory of George Dyer, 1971, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm) installation view
Francis BaconIn Memory of George Dyer, 1971, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - In Memory of George Dyer, 1971, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)
Francis BaconIn Memory of George Dyer, 1971, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, Triptych, Each panel 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)

Paintings by Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon - Portrait of George Dyer Riding a Bicycle, 1966, Oil and sand on canvas
Francis BaconPortrait of George Dyer Riding a Bicycle, 1966, Oil and sand on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Portrait of George Dyer Riding a Bicycle, 1966, Oil and sand on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)
Francis BaconPortrait of George Dyer Riding a Bicycle, 1966, Oil and sand on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)

Francis Bacon - Lying Figure, 1969, Oil on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm) installation view
Francis BaconLying Figure, 1969, Oil on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Lying Figure, 1969, Oil on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)
Francis BaconLying Figure, 1969, Oil on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198 x 147.5 cm)

Francis Bacon - 1974 - 1975 Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas 78 x 58 in. (198.1 x 147.3 cm), installation view
Francis BaconTwo Studies from the Human Body, 1974-1975, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198.1 x 147.3 cm), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Two Studies from the Human Body, 1975
Francis BaconTwo Studies from the Human Body, 1974-1975, Oil and dry transfer lettering on canvas, 78 x 58 in. (198.1 x 147.3 cm)

Francis Bacon - Lying Figure, 1961, oil on canvas, 198.0 × 142.0 Size (cm), 78.0 × 55.9 Size (in), installation view
Francis BaconLying Figure, 1961, oil on canvas, 198.0 × 142.0 Size (cm), 78.0 × 55.9 Size (in), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Francis Bacon - Lying Figure, 1961, oil on canvas, 198.0 × 142.0 Size (cm), 78.0 × 55.9 Size (in)
Francis Bacon – Lying Figure, 1961, oil on canvas, 198.0 × 142.0 Size (cm), 78.0 × 55.9 Size (in).jpg
Francis BaconLying Figure, 1961, oil on canvas, 198.0 × 142.0 Size (cm), 78.0 × 55.9 Size (in), installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland

Installation view of paintings by Francis Bacon at Fondation Beyeler
Installation view of paintings by Francis Bacon at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti sculptures

Francis Bacon - Head VI, 1949 and Alberto Giacometti - Le nez, 1947-49
Francis BaconHead VI, 1949 and Alberto GiacomettiLe nez, 1947-49
Photo: Fondation Beyeler

Alberto Giacometti - Le nez, 1947-49, 43,6 × 9 × 61,6 cm
Alberto GiacomettiLe nez, 1947-49, 43,6 × 9 × 61,6 cm, installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Grande Tête Mince, 1954, 65.6 x 39.1 x 24.9 cm, installaton view
Alberto GiacomettiGrande Tête Mince, 1954, 65.6 x 39.1 x 24.9 cm, installation view at Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Grande Tête Mince, 1954, 65.6 x 39.1 x 24.9 cm
Alberto GiacomettiGrande Tête Mince, 1954, 65.6 x 39.1 x 24.9 cm
Photo: Succession Alberto Giacometti/2018, ProLitteris, Zurich

Alberto Giacometti and Francis Bacon, 1965
Alberto Giacometti and Bacon, 1965, original photo by Graham Keen
Photo: Public Delivery

Related posts


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment
A first look at the new, intimate Giacometti museum in Paris

A first look at the new, intimate Giacometti museum in Paris

Alberto Giacometti museum, Montparnasse, Paris, reconstructed atelier
Reconstructed studio of Alberto Giacometti on 23m2 including more than 70 original artworks at Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

About the Institut Giacometti, Paris

Swiss sculptor and painter Alberto Giacometti has a new exhibition space in Paris. Hosted in an Art Nouveau villa, this museum shows a reconstruction of his legendary studio, including furniture and walls on which he left numerous sketches. The new space is located in the former artists’ district of Montparnasse, just a few blocks from the original Parisian studio, where Giacometti worked from 1926 until his death in 1966.

Some of the artworks are very fragile and have never been shown in public. This project is initiated by the Fondation Giacometti, which owns the largest Giacometti collection worldwide.

Location of the Giacometti Institute, Paris

Address Giacometti Institute, 5 Rue Victor Schoelcher, 75014 Paris
Hours The Institute is open by an online reservation system
Visit Métro ligne 4 et 6 : Raspail ou Denfert-Rochereau; RER B : Denfert-Rochereau; Bus ligne : 38, 68, 88, ou 91

Photos of the Institut Giacometti, Paris

Alberto Giacometti museum, Montparnasse, Paris, outside
Exterior of the Art Nouveau villa which hosts the Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Femmes de Venise
Alberto GiacomettiFemmes de Venise, 1956, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Portrait of Jean Genet, 1954-1955, Oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cm
Alberto GiacomettiPortrait of Jean Genet, 1954-1955, Oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cm, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - interior
Interior of Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - interior
Interior of Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - sculpture
Alberto Giacometti, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris, Art Noveau Villa
Interior of Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - installation view
Installation view, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - drawing 1
Alberto Giacometti drawing, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - drawing 2
Alberto Giacometti drawing, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - letter
Alberto Giacometti letter, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Alberto Giacometti - Institut Giacometti, Paris - sculpture 1
Alberto Giacometti sculpture, Institut Giacometti, Paris
Photo: Public Delivery

Related posts


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Support Public Delivery

We are a non-profit dedicated to changing the status quo of the art world. We work with recognized artists, art spaces and organizations, but also visit remote places and work with communities who are often overlooked, trying to establish balance within the global conversation about creativity. Public Delivery brings you unique and fresh content, and often thought-provoking ideas, free to all.

But we can’t do it without you.

Come join us

Want inspiration in your inbox?

Public Delivery