Archive: exhibition
Higher than trees: A seemingly impossible installation

Higher than trees: A seemingly impossible installation

Tomás Saraceno - In Orbit, 2013. Installation view, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, K21 Ständehaus, Düsseldorf
Tomás SaracenoIn Orbit, 2013, permanent installation at Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, K21 Ständehaus, Düsseldorf

A massive installation by Tomás Saraceno titled In Orbit has to be one of the artist’s most notable and successful installations. At a height of more than 20 meters, Saraceno suspended a mesh construction within which audiences could move weightlessly on the net. The net construction, which was accessible on 3 levels, was designed to resemble a cloud setting or landscape.

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Why do these massive piles of rubble fill up art spaces?

Why do these massive piles of rubble fill up art spaces?

's Main Hall, 2010, Installation View, Secession, Vienna, Austria
Lara AlmarceguiConstruction Rubble of Secession’s Main Hall, 2010, Installation View, Secession, Vienna, Austria

Spanish born Lara Almarcegui who currently lives in Rotterdam has always had a deep curiosity for examining processes of contemporary transformation that are brought about by the social, political and economic transformations in society. Since the early 1990s, Lara has examined urban areas that most artists choose not focus on such as rubble from construction materials and stuff from wastelands. Lara carefully catalogs and highlights each location’s inclination towards entropy or lack of order and predictability.

Her projects vary based on the intention of the message. For instance, she developed a guide to the wastelands in Amsterdam consisting of materials used to establish the wasteland in its raw form. Lara has managed to consolidate a reputation for herself as a respectable and revered artist in the global artist realm. In 2013, her work allowed her to act as Spain’s only representative in the 55th Venice Biennial.

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Destroyed and Reconstructed – Lucio Fontana’s mesmerizing neon installations

Destroyed and Reconstructed – Lucio Fontana’s mesmerizing neon installations

Lucio Fontana - Struttura al Neon per la IX Triennale di Milano, 1951:2017, installation view at Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan, 2017. Photo Agostino Osio
Lucio FontanaStruttura al Neon per la IX Triennale di Milano, 1951/2017, installation view at Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan, 2017
Photo: Agostino Osio

Lucio Fontana’s interest in technological and scientific advancements that occurred during the 20th century largely inspired his approach to a wide array of methods and mediums. For instance, he has worked with stone, neon, ceramics and even metals. As a painter, he went beyond two-dimensional surfaces by engaging technology as a means to attain expressions of the 4th dimension. By going beyond the expected, Lucio managed to create an innovative and new aesthetic dialect that blended painting, sculpture, and architecture.

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Korean vases: Imperfection gives way to stunning results

Korean vases: Imperfection gives way to stunning results

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase Thousand, 2012. Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable, Korea Artist Prize, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Korea
Translated Vase Thousand, 2012. Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable, Korea Artist Prize, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Korea

Yeesookyung is a South Korean artist living in Seoul. She is known for her complex and enchanting ceramic designs and sculptures. The Translated series series, like many of her works, is made up of shards and fragments of broken ceramic pieces that are carefully pieced together like a jigsaw puzzle. Yeesookyung created her Translated Vase back in 2002 after she observed discarded trash from the ceramic master Lim Hang Taek glimmering in the sunlight. The reflection of light from the shards and the organic forms of the cracks inspired her craft.

To create the Translated Vase, Yeesookyung uses epoxy resin to glue together the different fragments of the broken pots. To make the fissures and the cracks more prominent, Yeesookyung uses 24-carat gold leaf for glazing. The gold acts as the perfect addition to complement the beautifully misshapen fractures of the re-constructed vase.

The biomorphic form of the vessel helps to capture the eye immediately as the repurposed pottery created manages to surpass the original beauty of the vase. The Translated Vase combines the delicate fragility of ceramic pottery with the fortified strength of the glue and the gold, the end result of which is something truly magnificent. Yeesookyung covers the cracks in gold because the Korean word for crack and gold is similar. The use of products that share the same name also helps to add an element of humor to the work.

Yeesookyung’s technique in pottery, as stunning as it may be is not new. For years, artists in Korea have been reconstructing and rebuilding discarded ceramic pieces that would typically be considered trash in other parts of the world. The waste is sometimes restored to create new Korean ceramics while others like Yeesookyung’s are used as art. This art form, known as Kinstukuroi also uses metals such as platinum and silver for the repairing process.

The Translated Vase represents the struggle that all individuals face in life. The cracks on the vase represent the wounds that are formed from the struggle while the gold represents the beauty and maturity that people experience when they overcome suffering. Aside from denoting the suffering, Yeesookyung’s attention to detail helped to break the ceramic tradition that insists on perfection.

Rather than discard a perfect piece, like a master potter would, Yeesookyung chose to create new forms from the useless pieces to emphasize that imperfection can also give way to stunning beauty. It is safe to say that the Translated Vase succeeded in channeling the imperfections and irregularities that exist in nature.

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable
Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable”

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase (Detail), 2009, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable
Translated Vase (Detail), 2009, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf. Dimensions variable

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2011, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf 13 × 12 3:5 × 12 3:5 in 33 × 32 × 32 cm
Translated Vase, 2011, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 33 × 32 × 32 cm”

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 34 cm diameter
Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 34 cm diameter

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2014, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24-carat gold leaf 44 x 44 x 44 cm (17.32 x 17.32 x 17.32 in)
Translated Vase, 2014, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24-carat gold leaf 44 x 44 x 44 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 61 x 47 x 52 cm
Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 61 x 47 x 52 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 44 x 50 x 44 cm
Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 44 x 50 x 44 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 37 x 31 x 34 cm
Translated Vase, 2010, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 k gold leaf, 37 x 31 x 34 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2007, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 43 x 45 x 49cm
Translated Vase, 2007, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 43 x 45 x 49cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2008, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf 35 × 20 1:2 × 19 3:10 in 89 × 52 × 49 cm
Translated Vase, 2008, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 89 × 52 × 49 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic Shards, Epoxy, 24k Gold Leaf, 160 x 92 x 95 cm
Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic Shards, Epoxy, 24k Gold Leaf, 160 x 92 x 95 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 karat gold leaf 135 x 85 x 85 cm
Translated Vase, 2010, ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 karat gold leaf, 135 x 85 x 85 cm”

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2010, ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 karat gold leaf 158 x 90 x 90 cm
Translated Vase, 2010, ceramic trash, epoxy, 24 karat gold leaf, 158 x 90 x 90 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2016, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf_174(h) x 128 x 120cm
Translated Vase, 2016, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 174 x 128 x 120cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2011, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24K gold leaf,, 66 x 64 x 97cm
Translated Vase, 2011, Ceramic trash, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 66 x 64 x 97cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic shards, aluminum bars, epoxy resin, 24K gold leaf, 122x84x81cm
Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic shards, aluminum bars, epoxy resin, 24K gold leaf, 122 x 84 x 81 cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2014, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 220x110x100cm
Translated Vase, 2014, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 220 x 110 x 100 cm”

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase, 2007, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 120x210x95cm. Collection of National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea.
Translated Vase, 2007, Ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 120 x 210 x 95cm, Collection of National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase (Installation View), 2009, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 85 x 170 x 80cm 2
Installation View of Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 85 x 170 x 80cm

Yeesookyung - Translated Vase (Installation View), 2009, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 85 x 170 x 80cm
Installation View of Translated Vase, 2009, Ceramic trash, aluminum bar, epoxy, 24K gold leaf, 85 x 170 x 80cm


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Hyperrealistic sculpture tells the story of love

Hyperrealistic sculpture tells the story of love

Ron Mueck - Couple Under An Umbrella, 2013 1c
Couple Under An Umbrella, 2013, mixed media, 300 x 400 x 500 cm (approx.)

At first glance, especially from a picture, it is easy to assume that the Couple under an Umbrella sculpture is a real life image frozen in time. In a world marred by conflict and competition, everybody appreciates the display of affection by people. The couple in question is quite elderly and the artist must have chosen to use this age because of its ability to influence multiple generations. The sculpture tells the story of love at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain in Paris, France where it rests on a pavilion designed by Jean Nouvel.

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46 years in the making: Artist creates visual feel of infinity

46 years in the making: Artist creates visual feel of infinity

Doug Wheeler - PSAD Synthetic Desert III, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Photo David Heald
Doug WheelerPSAD Synthetic Desert III, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Photo: David Heald

Over 40 years ago, a leading Light and Space artist called Doug Wheeler imagined an art project that resembled the tranquility you would experience if you travelled to an expansive desert such as the one in Arizona. For a long time, the idea only existed on paper due to the amount of resources it required to get going.

Luckily, a while back, the Guggenheim Museum in New York decided to take up the project and realize the Doug’s dream.

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Properties torched in the name of art

Properties torched in the name of art


Ian Strange – Film still from Suburban

Suburban is a complex film and photography installation that was created by New York-based Australian artist Ian Strange. Suburban was created by Strange as a result of a collaboration with a film crew and volunteers from different parts of America including Alabama, Detroit, New Hampshire, Ohio and New York. Over the course of three months Strange and the film crew photographed and filmed 8 different sites that featured singular suburban homes from different states.

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