Archive: Art in China and by Chinese artists
The longest snake you have ever seen

The longest snake you have ever seen

Huang Yong Ping - Ressort 2012, Aluminium, stainless steel, Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, Australia
Huang Yong Ping – Ressort, 2012, aluminium, stainless steel, 53m/185 foot, Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, Australia

Introduction

A massive snake in real life? Absolutely frightening. A massive snake skeleton, aluminum and stainless steel structure on the other hand? Absolutely exciting and awe-inspiring. Such is the Chinese-French artist Huang Yong Ping’s amazing aluminum snake sculpture, an installation he dubbed, Ressort. Designed and installed in 2012 for the Queensland Art Gallery in Australia, this magnificent structure features a snake skeleton made of silver vertebrae, undulating in a sinuous manner from the ceiling to the floor. The beautifully extending sculpture spans 53 meters across the Watermall and was a great centerpiece for the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art #7.

About Huang Yong Ping

Huang Yong Ping was born in 1954 in Xiamen, China and is a contemporary artist who was part of the first students to be admitted to art academies after the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution1. Here, the artist developed a penchant for French postmodern theory, and along with the influence of Taoist and Zen Buddhist, he cofounded Xiamen Dada2, a well-known avant-garde group that mainly deals with construction materials in galleries as opposed to artworks. He lived in France where he shone the limelight on his art and as a result, while his artwork features Chinese mythological symbols such as the snake, it also sprinkles symbols and mythologies from the West; an approach that is evident in Ressort.

The meaning of ‘Ressort’

‘Ressort’, which is French for ‘spring’ is an apt name for this art piece as it also means energy. Huang’s use of the snake is evident in most of his work as the snake represents a central symbol of Chinese mythology3, and this specific pose that the skeleton took on as if uncoiling from the ceiling to the ground represents controlled energy and resilience. The snake in ancient Chinese myths is also a representation of knowledge and wisdom. In other Western cultures, it may be taken to represent fear, deception, desire and creation, even as evidenced in the Bible story of the Garden of Eden.

Read more


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Iconic performance: Naked people stacked on top of each other

Iconic performance: Naked people stacked on top of each other

Zhang Huan - To Add a Meter to an Anonymous Mountain, 1995, chromogenic print, 114.3 x 165.7 cm. (45 x 65 1/4 in.), edition of 15
Zhang Huan – To Add a Meter to an Anonymous Mountain, 1995, chromogenic print, 114.3 x 165.7 cm. (45 x 65 1/4 in.), edition of 15

Why is Zhang Huan important?

Zhang Huang is one of the greatest and perhaps most popular controversial artists in contemporary China. He first started making a name for himself in the mid-1990s thanks to his performances, many of which have frequently been regarded as too punishing. Case in point, some of his more popular performances featured him naked and covered in insects.

Read more


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments
Powerful photos of rainbow exploding over New York

Powerful photos of rainbow exploding over New York

Cai Guo-Qiang - Transient Rainbow, 2002, opening of MoMA QNS, New York City
Cai Guo-Qiang – Transient Rainbow, 2002, 1,000 3-inch multi-color peony fireworks fitted with computer chips, explosion radius approximately 200m. Realized over the East River, from Manhattan to Queens, 15 seconds explosion event in celebration of the opening of MoMA QNS, New York City
Photo: Hiro Ihara, courtesy Cai Studio

Introduction

The Transient Rainbow by Cai Guo-Qiang was a minute-long show of color and light and it was held at the East River, just over the southern tip of Roosevelt Island. The event was held by the Museum of Modern Art, New York to commemorate MOMA’s temporary move to Queens. The Transient Rainbow was displayed for the public on June 29, 2002. The Transient Rainbow was one among many special projects by other contemporary artists that had been commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art to celebrate the establishment of the Queens branch.

Cai Guo-Qiang - Transient Rainbow, 2002, opening of MoMA QNS, New York City
Cai Guo-Qiang – Transient Rainbow, 2002, 1,000 3-inch multi-color peony fireworks fitted with computer chips, explosion radius approximately 200m. Realized over the East River, from Manhattan to Queens, 15 seconds explosion event in celebration of the opening of MoMA QNS, New York City

Read more


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
Overworked and underpaid – Dramatic photos of workers

Overworked and underpaid – Dramatic photos of workers

Sebastião Salgado - Greater Burhan Oil Field, Kuwait, 1991, Chemical spray protects firefighter
Sebastião Salgado – Greater Burhan Oil Field, Kuwait, 1991
Chemical spray protects firefighter

The Story in Sebastiao Salgado’s workers

Sebastiao Salgado’s workers is an exceptional photography series and book thanks to its detail in men at work in the lowest levels and harshest conditions. His work shows solidarity with the world’s most poor societies. He seeks to recognize and appreciate the isolated peasants and refugees who represent a large portion of humankind. Salgado focuses on oppressed workers of South America comprising men and women who are overworked and underpaid. The book is a journey into activities that define the real labor force responsible for changing the world with major constructions. It also depicts the transformation from stone-age to the present industrialized levels.

Read more


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments
Ai Weiwei uses thousands of bicycles to create sculpture

Ai Weiwei uses thousands of bicycles to create sculpture

Ai Weiwei - Forever Bicycles, 2014
Ai WeiweiForever Bicycles, 2014. 1,254 bicycles. Dimensions variable. Installation view, Waller Creek Delta, The Contemporary Austin – Museum Without Walls Program, Austin, Texas, 2017
Photo: Brian Fitzsimmons

Ai Weiwei’s Forever Bicycles installation

Bicycles have always featured in Chinese artist Ai Weiwei’s installations. The very first time that Ai used bicycles was in his installation known as Very Yao in 2008. As the years have passed, his use of bicycles has only gotten grander as is evident in his piece titled the Forever Bicycles. In Forever Bicycles, Ai used Shanghai-based Forever Company bicycles to make his massive installation. The repetitiveness and the size of the installation were intended to allude to China’s mass production, which is well known to fuel the Chinese manufacturing industry.

Read more


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments
Chinese characters cover exterior of building

Chinese characters cover exterior of building

People’s Architecture Office - 白塔寺, White Pagoda Temple, Tabular Baitasi Visitor, Beijing Design Week, 2015, Beijing, China
People’s Architecture Office – 白塔寺, White Pagoda Temple, Tabular Baitasi Visitor center, Beijing Design Week, 2015, Beijing, China

In 2015, a Chinese studio known as People’s Architecture Office made waves on art and architecture media when they used metal air conditioning pipes to create large-scale Chinese characters on the front exterior of the Tabular Baitasi Visitor center during the Beijing Design Week. The Tabular Baitasi Visitor center has long been used to host events and exhibitions that showcase renewal or regeneration strategies for Beijing’s Batasi, which refers to a cultural and historical preservation zone situated within the capital.

Read more


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment
Zhang Huan in suit made from raw meat (video)

Zhang Huan in suit made from raw meat (video)

Zhang Huan - My New York, 2002
Zhang HuanMy New York, 2002, Whitney Biennial, New York

Introduction

Zhang Huan (张洹) is one of China’s best known conceptual and performance artists. In his sculptures and paintings, he references the history of his home country. As such, his pieces contain components of political, religious and intellectual messages as well as anonymous portrait and landscape scenes. Most of his works have mainly been used to promote Chinese culture and to spread a message with the intention of sanitizing the city. In particular, the issue of toilets is very dear to him and it has helped him create one of his most famous performance pieces.

Read more


Posted in Blog | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Support Public Delivery

We are a non-profit dedicated to changing the status quo of the art world. We work with recognized artists, art spaces and organizations, but also visit remote places and work with communities who are often overlooked, trying to establish balance within the global conversation about creativity. Public Delivery brings you unique and fresh content, and often thought-provoking ideas, free to all.

But we can’t do it without you.

Come join us

Want inspiration in your inbox?

Public Delivery