Adel Abdessemed, Algeria
adel-abdessemed

 

Adel Abdessemed (b. 1971) left Algeria in 1994, and he considers his act a political one: When there is no peace at home, one must go elsewhere, otherwise the soul will die. The most important thing is to act, to resist, and to create in order to change the world. Abdessemed’s work draws from a multiplicity of media, including sculptural installation, video, animation, and photography. While some critics label his controversial pieces inappropriate due to their often graphically violent nature, the acts as Abdessemed calls his politically committed artworks, consistently interact with larger global realities. Abdessemed’s apparent rage permeates throughout, calling viewers’ attention to expressions of brutality and frequently referencing failed immigration policies, exile, and displacement. His work has been widely exhibited.

With Public DeliveryExhibition Utopian Days, 2014

Adel Abdessemed - The Sea, 2008, Total Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, South Korea

Adel Abdessemed – The Sea, 2008, Total Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, South Korea

Adel Abdessemed - The Sea, 2008, Total Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, South Korea

Adel Abdessemed – The Sea, 2008, Total Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, South Korea


Utopian Days – Freedom was an exhibition at the Total Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, South Korea’s first private art museum. Later it was shown in the same city at the Nowon Culture and Arts Center.

Artists: Adel Abdessemed, Lida Abdul, Phil America, Ivan Argote, Chim↑Pom, Minerva Cuevas, Chto Delat?, Cyprien Gaillard, Yang-Ah Ham, Andre Hemer, Tehching Hsieh, Zhang Huan, Jani Leinonen, Klara Liden, Armando Lulaj, Matt McCormick, Filippo Minelli,
Wang Qingsong, Andres Serrano, Manit Sriwanichpoom,
Clemens von Wedemeyer, Kacey Wong, Xijing Men, He Yunchang.

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Adel Abdessemed – The Sea, 2008, 10 sec (loop), color, sound, Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London

Exhibited: The Sea, 2008

The sea, by Adel Abdessemed, is a video in which the artist faces the ocean on a rough slab of wood. A work that speaks about the role of the artist and questions of survival, The sea documents Abdessemed’s efforts to balance on his hands and knees on the wooden slab as it pitches with the ocean waves while he attempts to write the phrase Politically Correct.

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